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Bullet recovered from my Oct 06 Doe


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#1 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 10:32 AM

Here is a pic of the bullet I recovered from my recent doe. It is a Hornady 300 gr xtp shot in a harvester crush rib sabot in front of 80 gr of FFg Gooex.

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Here is another pic

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Contrary to what I originally thought this bullet did not hit bone. It hit the fleshy part of the front shoulder through a lung exited the opposite side flank and finally stopped low in the rear ham.

It started out at 45 cal or .45 and expanded to about 64 caliber.

I think I just found a new deer bullet.

I did forget one thing the bullet weighs 291.2 gr. To my reconning that means only about a 3 % Loss in weight.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 23 October 2006 - 03:55 PM.

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#2 cayugad

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Posted 23 October 2006 - 09:54 PM

I was shooting some of them today out of my Knight Disc rifle with 100 grains of Black Mag 3. The accuracy was excellent and the power from the Black Mag was impressive as well.

From what you report, I could not expect more from a bullet in deer hunting.
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#3 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 10:08 AM

I have shot a few of them too at targets. I was very happy with their groups at 100 yds which the best was under an inch. I took this rifle along to Colorado as a backup rifle on elk.

From the performance this bullet had on my doe it would have done the job on a cow elk had she slowed down enough for a shot.

I did find it kind of tough hunting in Colorado due to the altitude, weather, and not knowing quite how to hunt elk.
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#4 cayugad

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 10:55 AM

When I go back for a muzzleloader hunt, I am not taking chances. I'll hire a guide with mules and go in on horse to a base camp. Let them do the work. It's the only way I think I could make it now. Besides, let them do the work and let me have the fun. It's not like I go out every year.

I have not decided what State I want to hunt though. I've watched a lot of elk hunting shows taking place in different states, and there sure is some beautiful country and hunts out there to take. I do have a friend who told me he would haul me along, but he has no mules... :lol:
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, a total wreck with a big smile on your face."

#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 02:07 PM

I have to agree with you there. I have reached the age. Today I received my medicare card. The only problem is those hunts are really expensive. I can hunt on my own for 7 or 8 years on what a hunt like that costs. In those years I will have learned a whole lot about elk hunting from personal experience.

Guess it is all in how you look at it. I went to Colorado never having hunted there and never having hunted elk. After just the first year I know I could go back to that area and hunt it much better than I did this year. Of course we had 3 or 4 significant snows during the week we were there.
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#6 Spirithawk

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 05:27 PM

No better way to learn something than by doing it. I'll be doing my Elk hunting by living it through Paul. :D

#7 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 07:13 PM

Spirithawk you may be surprised. If you could get there the hunting can be as easy or hard as you want it. You can 4wd to most everywhere and not have to walk all that much. Of course if you want to you can walk back in. Eric and I were 2.6 miles from the truck on one foray. That spot looked like an elk barnyard.
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#8 paturbo

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 10:29 PM

I know the place Paul is talking about and I found it first :yes:


MD

#9 cayugad

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 06:11 AM

Actually there is nothing wrong with self hunts. I went on a couple moose hunts in Canada with friends who knew the area and how to do it. We had a great hunt, great fishing, and over all an excellent time.

Elk on the other hand many times you're talking mountains. While I have a 4 wheeler, some areas do not allow them. I just do not know if I have the stamina anymore to carry a elk quarter out over the hills, etc. Old age, growing belly bulge, and physical limitations are taking their toll on the body.

Actually when you go hunting with friends, they are a lot of fun. I am headed this spring if all goes well, for a hog hunt with some buddies, should be a good time.
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#10 Whistle Pig

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 09:39 PM

A whacked a button buck with that bullet in 240gr with 2-50gr pyrodex pellets years ago. There was no tracking, and quite any easy drag as I recall, I think he went 90lbs live weight. Mom's voice at home in the driveway still rings in my ear today "Who shot the fawn?" ...thanks mom.
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#11 cayugad

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 10:40 AM

A whacked a button buck with that bullet in 240gr with 2-50gr pyrodex pellets years ago. There was no tracking, and quite any easy drag as I recall, I think he went 90lbs live weight. Mom's voice at home in the driveway still rings in my ear today "Who shot the fawn?" ...thanks mom.

:D :D :D I tell you what.. when they throw that on the dinner plate, I will take a 90 pound deer any day of the week. Although I hunted with a fellow that beat even yours. We heard him shoot and thirty minutes later he come walking out of the woods.. rifle in one hand and that spotted deer in the other. It weighed 52 pounds.

We skinned that deer hole, cut the legs off it, and cooked it whole on a Weber grill. Talk about eating... WOW!! Now when we see a small deer we always refer to them as a Weber.
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#12 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 01:12 PM

This is actually my third deer with the XTP bullets. I shot one in Kansas that due to a slightly too far back shot I had to track and trail for about 150 yds. When I got to her it looked like she was bloated. When I started to field dress her the blook spurted out like I had hit an artery. I had clipped the one lung and just destroyed the liver. Last fall I got a doe on the mt across from my home. I hit her real good and she ran about 40 yds straight down the steep part till she fell. These two were shot with the 240 gr xtps. I started trying heavier slugs for Colorado and when I got to the 300 gr there was no looking back. Accuracy was great and now I know the bullet does it's part for the kill.
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#13 Whistle Pig

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 10:21 PM

CO must have changed the regs, when I went out...no sabots. I got stuck using 3?? (300 and something, don't remember) grain powerbelts. I was thinking about switching to 300 gr xtp this year... I might yet. My H&R Muzzleloader loves the 240gr XTP/2-50gr pyro pellets load...we're talking a ragged hole at 100 yards (w/ scope)...My TC Omega targets look like I was trying to pattern a shotgun (with some massive buckshot) Not pleased with the omega thus far.
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#14 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 07:13 AM

Seth no the regs have not changed. I had a modern rifle cow permit. When you use a muzzleloader in the modern rifle season most of the restrictions do not apply. I had my choice of bullets, a scope etc. About the only rule was it had to be at least 50 cal. When you look at the muzzleloader restrictions most say "during the muzzleloader season" which I learned that if I decided to hunt with a muzzleloader during the rifle season those do not apply then. Of course I had confirmed all this with the Ruffians beforehand.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




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