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black powder loads


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#1 irinman2424

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 01:09 PM

does anyone know if there is a website ( Ive been trying to find one with no luck)
that will give common loads for black powder I would greatly appreciate it
also just out of curiosity the 44 revolver black powder I know its illegal in Ohio to use but would it have enough power to take a deer? a friend of mine and I were talking about it the other day discussing it and I think with the right charge it would he said no way possible just wondering
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#2 cayugad

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 06:35 PM

does anyone know if there is a website ( Ive been trying to find one with no luck)
that will give common loads for black powder I would greatly appreciate it
also just out of curiosity the 44 revolver black powder I know its illegal in Ohio to use but would it have enough power to take a deer? a friend of mine and I were talking about it the other day discussing it and I think with the right charge it would he said no way possible just wondering


As for a site that will tell you... this rifle shoots this load. That's impossible. All rifles are different. What one rifle will/might shoot, the next rifle off the line will/might not. There just is no telling what the rifle will do. These rifles are very different among themselves.

Give us some information on make, twist, barrel length, projectile choice, and ignition system and we might be able to set you on to a good load that will work for you.

As for your question about the revolver, yes it will kill a deer. If you can get close enough. If you can place that ball in the right spot. And if you have a good strong load. I know they will knock a pig off their feet for butchering. The pig was shot at 10 yards between the eyes and it knocked it right down. Whether the ball killed it, I could not say as the butchering process started right away. If these are the 1851 or 1858 models, they really are marginal because they only shoot 30 grains max and less then that in the 1851 with no top strap. If a person wanted to hunt deer get a Walker Colt which can take 50 grains I believe it is, or one of the BuckHunter models... They can take 70 grains of powder.
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#3 irinman2424

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 07:06 PM

its just the controversy of someone saying 23 grains someone else saying 35 grains and not knowing in black and white I dont know enough about them to feel at ease experimenting with it
I believe in fillet and release!

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#4 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 09:48 PM

Irin Go toHodgdon Webpage there you can order for free their Hodgdon Basic Muzzleloading manual. It will give an explanation of both 777 and Pyrodex powders and pellets. They also give you their maximum Rifle loads. They give full Pistol Loading instructions along with Projectiles for use with pellets They give data for 777 and Pyrodex pellets and velocities. Then they give 777 data for the powder in rifle, revolvers and even cartridge cases. Later they do the same thing for Pyrodex powder. They even give hints on cleaning. For a free publication it is really a good booklet. I think I had mine in about 3 days.

I stand corrected I just went to their website and did not find the free manuals listed anywhere. They do have all the info posted on their site that you maybe could print for yourself.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 23 November 2006 - 09:58 PM.

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#5 cayugad

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 07:50 PM

its just the controversy of someone saying 23 grains someone else saying 35 grains and not knowing in black and white I dont know enough about them to feel at ease experimenting with it

The black powder revolvers vary in powder charge ability more because of design. The 1851 does not have a top strap. For that reason, the strength lies in the cylinder lock rod. For that reason they do not load them hot. 25 grains is about the max. The 1858 Remington like I have has a top strap and for that reason they can be pushed to 30 grains of 3f powder. I shoot 25 grains because that's where the accuracy is. The Colt Walker is a very heavy framed revolver and they are top strapped as well. For that reason they can take some very powerful charges. But again remember in all this, you are shooting a .451 roundball most the time. This is not a big chunk of lead.

Some of the more modern black powder handguns like the Tradition's Buckhunter Pro will take 70 grains. This with a roundball will produce some serious fps and will let you take deer much easier then the other revolvers.

Read the manual that comes with the revolver. They will give you recommended loads. As for the killing power, we all know a simple .22 cal can kill a deer if put in the right place.
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#6 Spirithawk

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 06:30 PM

If you really wan't a black powder revolver to hunt with then you won't find a better one than the Ruger New Army modeled after the Remington 1858 New Army. It's the magnum of BP revolvers and has fully adjustable sights. Like Cayugad said, there are also many single shot black powder hand guns designed specifically for hunting.

Edited by Spirithawk, 25 November 2006 - 06:32 PM.


#7 Fred

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 11:29 AM

If you really wan't a black powder revolver to hunt with then you won't find a better one than the Ruger New Army modeled after the Remington 1858 New Army. It's the magnum of BP revolvers and has fully adjustable sights. Like Cayugad said, there are also many single shot black powder hand guns designed specifically for hunting.

It would be best to get a very early one though as the cylinder is larger and has a better capacity. Pre-Warning is the type I have in mind. Fred
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#8 Spirithawk

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 07:08 PM

I agree with Fred. Sometimes older is better and the early ones were awesome handguns.




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