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Bowfishing- have you tried it


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#1 tdl12321

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 09:26 PM

Anybody here ever tried bowfishing. If so, what did you think?

#2 runNgun

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Posted 01 April 2006 - 09:52 PM

I would like to try it, I think it would be a blast


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#3 TerryfromAR

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Posted 02 April 2006 - 06:05 PM

Never tried it but i'd like to, but knowing my luck, i wouldn't set the reel up right and i'd end up having the arrow sling back and hit me in the eye or something LOL like i said, i'd like to try it, but i don't wanna push my luck. LOL
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#4 bonecollector34

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 08:19 PM

Nope I also have never tried it, but seen people on TV hit a few fish with em.


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#5 Larry $

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Posted 02 May 2007 - 07:19 AM

Did it out of a canoe as a teenager in the 70's. We were after carp in Michigan. It was fun, but I never "took" to it.
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#6 McBruce

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 07:11 AM

well Larry....it didnt go BOOM and make lots of smoke, ... no wonder you never took to it. :)

TD, nope I've never tried it, I have enough issues getting those fish the reg way.
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#7 Leo

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 12:22 PM

Couple things.

1. Low poundage is the way to go. 45lbs is plenty.
2. You will ruin a release very quickly bowfishing so learn to shoot with a TAB.
3. Only bowfish over mud or sand. Rocks will destroy a fish arrow. Stumps and roots will grab a fish arrow and never let go.
4. Sight in with the fish arrow. The deeper the fish the more refraction plays a part.
5. Don't use cobbed together bowfishing gear. You will get hurt if you try this.

Honestly, I've found you need a dedicated set-up to bowfish with. Bowfishing with your bowhunting set up is a mistake. Bowfishing is hard on your gear. You've got to clean and oil everything after every trip. No exceptions. For me it was never enough fun to justify the work it entails.
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#8 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 03:00 PM

I live on the shores of the mighty St. Lawrence River. No better place for bowfishing.........for carp that is!

Like Leo said, don't use your hunting rig and paraphenalia to go bowfishing. If you can dedicate a rig solely for bowfishing, that'd be my preference. There's a heap of old bows at yard sales that no longer can demand a premium price and are excellent for bowfishing. If you can opt for a recurve, even better. The addage "KISS" (Keep It Simple Stupid), works quite well for a bowfishing rig.

The more trinkets you have on your bow, the more bowfishing line is apt to get caught on it and break. Learn to shoot with your fingers and I'd even suggest ripping the sights off the bow. Use a simple arrow rest too. None of those ramps, flippers, NASA launch pads or the like. I use an old Bear rubber Weather rest and it works quite well. No lines have ever got caught on it.

Don't use those fishing pole handles that screw into your bow handle and don't use an actual fishing reel (spinning or spincast). Use a large drum type spool that you manually have to wrap the line around. And make sure it will litterally fall off the spool when shot. If it won't run free off the spool, it means more brokem lines and lost arrows.

I'd suggest at least 100 lb test line. Some guys will feed the line at the knock and up to the arrow tip, but I've found that the line knot at the tip will fray and break off after hitting a few carp. Their fish scales and bones are like armor and will reek havoc on your lines. Just tie it off at the arrow nock and hope you don't get a complete pass-through.

I like my poundage around 50 to 60 lbs draw weight. For those big 40 to 50 lb lunkers, you'll need some decent punch to keep 'em hooked.

And don't scrimp on cheap fishing tips or arrows, although it is a crying shame when your line breaks and you see your arrow fade into history in the murky deep. Or worse, you see the nock of your arrow fishtailing through the water after a scaled beheamoth has allowed you to imbed your $15 to $20 arrow just deep enough to grab it, then the line snaps! Adios Amigo!

When the spawn is on and the carp are into the shallows, that's your best time in the water. Usually around end of May or June. Best days are bright sunny warm days with no wind. The carp will invade the catails and rushes like crazy. I have a ton of fun wearing chest waders and carefully stalk the rushes. Move slow and keep peering for a moving fin or swirling water. I've had a number of times when a 30 to 40 lb carp has been spooked by yours truly and tried to evade my advance. The carp doesn't know where you are and will sometimes run right into a bowfisherman whose sneaking through heavy catails or muddy water. I've heard grown men scream when they're rammed anywhere from the waist down.

Some diehards will set up a boat rig that encompasses an elevated platform. It allows the shooter to see directly down into the wter and decreases the refraction effect. Don't forget to shoot under their bodies to allow for that refraction.

I don't bowfish a lot, but when I do, it's a hoot!

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#9 Spirithawk

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Posted 23 May 2007 - 07:51 PM

My son and I have been wanting to try it. I'm thinking of setting up an old Hoyt Pro recurve I have.

#10 leeyn

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 08:17 PM

I would like to try it...
Maybe it is a good way........


#11 TerryfromAR

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 05:33 AM

I was thinking about getting a small "kids" compound to set up for this, like the Brave 2 or something..... 40-45 lbs should be plenty...
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