Jump to content


Photo

Performance and Expectations


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 mudduck

mudduck

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Interested in almost everything, unless it bores me, then I'm not interested anymore

Posted 11 December 2006 - 01:35 PM

Are you satisfied with your current bowhunting set-up? If yes, why? What are your needs and why does your set-up meet them? If no, then what would you want to change, and why? What are your accuracy demands? How far do you need to shoot? Just asking a few questions, I realize that we have hunters from all over and that one set-up for a particular region may not be right for another, but just interested in the answers one gets from others experiences.

#2 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 December 2006 - 03:11 PM

Jeff I still consider myself a newbie to bowhunting. I remember this conversation with you once at Wilderness. I like to hear what everyone has and their reasons for using it to. :yes:
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#3 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

    Hunting Resource

  • Owner/Admin
  • 3,087 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Pennsylvania
  • Interests:God, Family, Hunting, Archery, Outdoors, Computers, Website Development...

Posted 11 December 2006 - 03:48 PM

I am pretty satisfied with all of my current archery rigs. Each has a specific use and therefore has specific attributes that make them "ideal" for what they are used for.

Specifically concerning hunting rigs, I do a lot of bowhunting out of a ground blind. Over the years I have learned a few things hunting this way. For starters, the shorter the bow is the better. Beyond that, you can forget about the fancy longer stabilizer and/or sight bracket. Although they may increase accuracy, they simply have no place in such a hunting situation. (I actually had a 10" stabilizer hit the front of my blind on one hunt. My fault for not practicing out of the blind with the exact set-up I would be using before hand. The stabilizer was a late change.) Frankly, I will even sacrifice longer range accuracy and comfortable string-to-face anchoring positions (as a result of extreme string angle given a 31" axle to axle bow pulling a 30" draw length) if need be. Fortunately, I lose very little accuracy at my typical hunting distances out of my favorite short hunting bow, the Mathews Switchback XT. It's the total package. There may be faster bows, but they are generally louder and have a more harsh draw cycle. There may be lighter bows, but they are generally going to have more noise or shock on the shot. Nothing else on the market blends all of the things most people look for in a bow (speed, noise/shock free shooting, smooth draw cycle, quality machining and materials, decent looks, and probably some others I am forgetting to mention) without neglecting any one area in favor of another. I know that may sound a bit commercial, but I have no reason to plug them. I've owned bows from virtually every manufacture going over the years and they still get my vote as "king of the hill" and I have no reason to say that. I don't get anything from them and they sponsor me in no way. I liked my Hoyt Trykon XL when I had it and I still like my BowTech Constitution. I also like my Diamond Black Ice. None of them do or did it all though. I always come back to one for the hunt.

If I didn't hunt the way I do my choice may be different. To be honest, I like the way a 34"-36" axle to axle bow holds/shoots for me compared to a 31". If all I did was hunt whitetail spot and stalk or out of an open front treestand my choice may be different. For that matter, if I hunted more open terrain out west my choice would certainly be different. But, my choice(s) is/are definitely mainly fueled by location and hunting style.

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

sig_admin.png


#4 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 December 2006 - 09:00 AM

Jer. that's a great point shooting a 31" bow verses 33" or 34" ATA bow out of a treestand that has a front rail. I find that if I raise the seat cushion on my summit viper all the way up I can shoot a 31" or 33" bow and still sit and shoot. It takes some leaning forward but it works. A 34" or longer its not possible and it comes in contact with the rail. I have to stand to shoot. I like a front rail to rest my bow but the front open treestand is probably the easiest to shoot out of sitting or standing.

I've hunted out of ground tent type blind several times and your right about practising a bit from one before actually trying to hunt. It's a whole nother way to hunt compared to treestands. But a longer ATA bow work just fine in one.

Actually this conversation I have had several other times now in other hunting camps about bows and setups. It seems to alway come up around the dinner table or if you have your equipment out someone always comes over to check it over and asks questions. ^_^
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#5 Leo

Leo

    Hunting Resource

  • Administrators
  • 3,155 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina

Posted 12 December 2006 - 04:04 PM

I've got a Bowtech Extreme Solo. Why? Because of my injury, I needed a lower poundage bow that shot faster with a higher letoff. The Bowtech was a last years model when I bought it, so I got a deal! :)

I use Tru-Glo sites. I know they are cheap. But the reason they are cheap is because Tru-Glo manufactures Fiber-Optic pins for practically every site manufacturer out there. So why not go with the original manufacturer ;)

I shoot Redhead Carbon Fury arrows. Ok not the straightest arrows but I'm not shooting tourneyments. My success rate is not based on fractions of an inch. I refletch them with blazer vanes to bring up there FOC.

I use G5 Montecs and Rocketaeroheads expandables. Good heads they work and are worth the money.

I use a Muzzy Zero effect rest. Honestly from a sheer engineering standpoint. This rest is head and shoulders above the other drop aways on the market. It's intimidating to set up but when it's right, by golly it's right!

I've got an STS silencer on my bow. Took the silencers off the string. I does help shot consistency.

I use a timberline no-peep and a kisser. This establishes a very repeatable anchor for me plus gives me the ability to shoot in lower light without a site light. And it gets one more thing off the string (ie. peep site)

I've got a tru-glo stabilizer on the front of my bow. This is just for balance. I don't care one bit about hand shock. I don't feel it anyhow. I just want the bow to balance level in my left hand by itself. This accomplishes that nicely.

I do not encumber my bow with a quiver. Hip quiver only. Of the accessories I've had on my bows over the years. Nothing screws up your shooting worse than a on bow quiver. If you've gotta have one, take it off when hunting or practising.
Posted Image

#6 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 13 December 2006 - 08:47 AM

I do not encumber my bow with a quiver. Hip quiver only. Of the accessories I've had on my bows over the years. Nothing screws up your shooting worse than a on bow quiver. If you've gotta have one, take it off when hunting or practising.



;) ;) Leo I totally agree with you. I practise without one. I have tried the cat quiver II and it's ok but isn't for treestand hunting, more spot and stalk. Hip quivers don't help much in a stand either. I take mine off when I can once up in my treestand or in a blind and put it in my backpack fletchings up and have a backup arrow loose ready to grab for second opportunity. If I'd be ever so lucky. :lol:

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 13 December 2006 - 01:03 PM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#7 McBruce

McBruce

    Marketing

  • Managers
  • 2,155 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:shooting/ rifle/blackpowder/handguns/archery/ shotguns. atving, photography ( scenic and wildlife ) Being out in the Mtns of Colorado any chance I can get.

Posted 13 December 2006 - 08:20 PM

my set up is a Mathews LX ( hmm 3 or 4 years old now ) last year they sold the LX I believe. I went to buy an outback and Don ( the shop owner ) said, you know you want a mathews you just dont know which one. Dont go with marketing hype go with what fits you. When we got done shooting ever mathews model he had on hand ( and a few that other archers allowed me to shoot who were at the range ) I came away on a blind choice with the LX.
the shorter axle to axle of the outback gave me problems with my 5 7/8 irish head. the angle of the string and the height the peep needed to be set at moved it to far way from my eye. doesnt seem like a couple of inches in axle to axle can have that effect but it did.

I put on a Copper Johns Dead nuts site. I've gone through 3 of them and the next one will be a Spot Hogg.

I put a copper johns alley cat drop away rest on it. I've loved it from day one. Anyone else whos shot my bows with it, hates it, because you dont have a lot holding the arrow from tipping off the side. Once you get use to it, and pull straight back, your arrow stays put, even when shooting out of tree stands.


release is the Carter 2 shot. don't see any changes there any time soon.

like leo I don't go with a long stabalizer. I simply want the bow to balance.
the small amount of vibration isnt enought to worry about.

I did put on a custom grip ( torquless ) and love it.
I ordered a new string from Pro String and havent gotten a chance to put it on yet.

I did switch to the Carbon express axis for an arrow with blazer vanes.

montec g5 100 gr for broadheads.

I hardly ever shoot field tips any more. I have practice broad heads on and keep a set for hunting sharp and ready.
yes I go through a few targets a year, but I don't want any surprises when I take a shot, as to how an arrow will fly since I changed from field tips to broad heads.

I have the apline soft lock 3 arrow quiver on the bow. I keep 3 arrows in it all the time when shooting. I've tried hip quivers and cat quivers, but when going through brush in the mtns on spot and stalk, its rough. so keeping those arrows on the bow makes it easier. but you also have to practice with that extra weight on there.

I've not found myself yet in a situation that I've needed 5 or 7 arrows and I don't see a reason to carry that many when out hunting.

what I want from accuracy. and distance. I want to hit something the size of a golf ball to base ball at 60 yards. if I can't keep it in a 3 inch group then I need to shorten my range till its there. I actually do about 80 percent of my practice shooting at 40-50-60 yards. and only 20 % at 20 -30.
when you can keep it tight at 60, 20 feels like a chip shot.
McBruce
Live what you believe
Believe what you live

#8 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

    Hunting Resource

  • Owner/Admin
  • 3,087 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Pennsylvania
  • Interests:God, Family, Hunting, Archery, Outdoors, Computers, Website Development...

Posted 13 December 2006 - 10:34 PM

I'll throw another area-specific issue out there that, perhaps, some can confirm... Multiple pins vs. a single pin slide sight. Seems a lot of guys here in the East (and anywhere that shorter shots in hunting are the norm) go ape scat over slide sights like HHA. But, I can't think of any western hunters, especially open range elk hunters, who use anything other than multiple pin sights. Most western outfitters/guides I've talked to actually laugh when they see a "greenhorn" coming into a camp with a single pin. They'll say, "You need to be ready to shoot anywhere from 20 to 60 yards in the blink of an eye and it aint gonna happen with a dial-O-yardage sight." :o) Personally, I've used both. So, I'm not slamming either. It's just one of those things that has stuck with me. (And, yes, I am back to shooting a multiple pin sight "just in case". :lol: )

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

sig_admin.png


#9 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 14 December 2006 - 09:07 AM

Since no one else of our other bowhunting brothers is jumping in I?ll wade in. I know there are some great bowhunting enthusiasts running around here with a great deal of information.

I?m a newbie and I have changed my setup from top to bottom several times making what I believe are improvements.

I have settled to shooting Mathews Bows after owning four other manufacturers now.

I use the Tru-fire and Tru-Ball releases, tried other found these work smoothest for me.

I tried several different sights and have settled for the Spot Hogg real deal. I like the multiple horizontal style pins and one that can be easily changed and is made tough.

The vertical pins I have tried and just can?t get use to them. I don?t shoot for competition just enjoyment. I regularly shoot at least 4 to 5 times a week and mainly at 40 yards and if it were possible I?d move out to 60 yards.

The one pin sight that pivot or adjust for distance I have not spent anytime with because the five-pin sight answers that for me when it?s setup in 10-yard increments out to 60 yards.


My choice of arrow rest is a drop away and someone here mentioned the Rip Cord rest and I?m glad he did. Does a great job in all kinds of weather and traps the arrow when I?m nervously bouncing around before the shot. Again I have tried a few others and prefer this one so far.


I have all carbon arrows from BlackHawk Vapor Pro arrows, Gold Tips, and Carbon express. I fletch my own shafts and I like the small blazer vanes right now.


I have soft spot for broadheads and have several different manufacturers and would love to try them all out on big game animals. I?m itching to give them a test run.
Sims vibrations stabilizer and limb savers with the other Sims stuff to quiet my setup.
I'd like to read some others setup for performance and expectations.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#10 mudduck

mudduck

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Interested in almost everything, unless it bores me, then I'm not interested anymore

Posted 14 December 2006 - 09:40 AM

Mathews Bow-SQ2, Didn't really care about brand names, but because most of my hunting is done for whitetails sitting on a stool on the ground, I needed a real short axle to axle bow, this one is about 31 inches so it fit the bill. Our temps here in Wisconsin can get extreme, one year on opening day temps were 80 in September and -20 on the 29th of December, A hundred degree difference. I use a Whisker Biscuit rest. I was looking for something that held an arrow securely,had no moving parts, and was quiet, and wasn't affected by temps or weather, this thing works for me. I use a Sightmaster Elite {1 Pin Dial-O-Yardage :lol: } sight, Blackhawk Carbon Vapor arrows and Muzzy 100gr. 3 blade broadheads, at 67lbs., the bow pushes these arrows fast enough that I use only 1 pin from 0 to 30 yds and shoot 3 inch groups. I have a quiver that attaches to my bow for transporting arrows,but I remove the quiver when I set up to hunt. I use no stabilizer, I really didn't see much difference with or without one at distances less than 30yds. I use a string loop, Fletchhunter release, and a modified peep sight{drilled out bigger}. I would prefer not to use a string loop-it requires me to take my eyes off the target to hook up- but it would be almost impossible with a short bow to keep arrows on the string If I hooked up directly to the string. What I use now works for me, I've taken a number of deer and hogs with it, so I am hesitant to change anything, but I am fascinated with some of the new mechanical broadheads. Right now though, I have no worries or concerns about my set-up, which makes me more confident when I go hunting, and that ain't a bad thing to take along. This is not an endorsment of any of these products simply because of the way that I bowhunt dictates what type of equipment I use.

Edited by mudduck, 14 December 2006 - 09:58 AM.


#11 Chrud

Chrud

    Can Charge Rent

  • Authors
  • 514 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Aniwa, Wisconsin
  • Interests:Outdoors, racing and sports.

Posted 14 December 2006 - 04:05 PM

Bow - 2005 Mathews Switchback. I don't see a change for a few more years. Once I get settled like I was before my lack of work, I would put a few dollars away each week, just for my archery setup. Within a couple years I'd have almost $1500. I'm always interested in the new bows, but right now I'm very happy with my Switchback. The only thing I don't care for is the 7" brace height. I think the Switchback XT would be a better shooter for me, but I don't have any complaints with the Switchback. At just 28" draw length and a 395 grain arrow, I can still get 275-278 FPS.

Rest - I started with a Schaffer. Then I tried the Mathews for a couple years. Both are very nice, but I'm going back to the Schaffer MAT-1. Just like the Mathews rest, the Schaffer "locks" on to the riser, so there is no play at all. The differences between them is that the Schaffer is one-piece, lighter and available in Hardwoods HD (now available in Realtree AP HD to match the new Drenalin). The Mathews has a few pieces to it, is significantly heavier.

Arrow - Gold Tip Pro Hunter 75/95. I really love these arrows. I've never had an arrow tune with fieldpoints and broadheads as easy as the GT's have. By that I mean there was no extra tuning required. :D

Broadhead - This year I tried the new Muzzy MX-4. I really like the thicker blades. I am going to try the new MX-3's when they come out, but will probably go back to the MX-4. The cutting diameter is smaller with 4-blades, but the extra cutting surface makes up for that.

Sight - Extreme Sniper Recon 700. I really like this sight. The only changes I'm making to it is switching pin color (yellow to probably red). And, the top pin will be 0.029" with the bottom three being 0.019". I am considering Sure-Loc as another choice in the future however.

Release - Carter Two Shot. The folks on here really helped me with that choice. And when a friend of my brother won one of the releases that Forrest donated, I tried it out and fell in love. I've never shot a caliper release with a trigger as incredible as the Two-Shot.

#12 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 December 2006 - 03:15 PM

I'll throw another area-specific issue out there that, perhaps, some can confirm... Multiple pins vs. a single pin slide sight. Seems a lot of guys here in the East (and anywhere that shorter shots in hunting are the norm) go ape scat over slide sights like HHA. But, I can't think of any western hunters, especially open range elk hunters, who use anything other than multiple pin sights. Most western outfitters/guides I've talked to actually laugh when they see a "greenhorn" coming into a camp with a single pin. They'll say, "You need to be ready to shoot anywhere from 20 to 60 yards in the blink of an eye and it aint gonna happen with a dial-O-yardage sight."  Personally, I've used both. So, I'm not slamming either. It's just one of those things that has stuck with me. (And, yes, I am back to shooting a multiple pin sight "just in case".  )


Jer. I looked at mudducks last time we were at Wilderness because he prefers a single pin. It looks simple enough and well made. I have mainly tried the vertical and horizontal 3 and 5 pin sights. I somehow have preferred the horizontal mulitple pin sight probably from al the earlier talk about Copper John sights. I liked those but they didn't hold up so I kepted looking around trying a few other from toxonics, true-glow and cobra to name a few and they were not made well and ended up trying the spot hogg. IMHO I would recommend the spot hogg for the long haul. Great product. :yes:
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#13 McBruce

McBruce

    Marketing

  • Managers
  • 2,155 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:shooting/ rifle/blackpowder/handguns/archery/ shotguns. atving, photography ( scenic and wildlife ) Being out in the Mtns of Colorado any chance I can get.

Posted 15 December 2006 - 08:48 PM

Rowdy:
which model of spot hogg would you suggest...pats in the market.
thanks
Bruce
McBruce
Live what you believe
Believe what you live

#14 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 16 December 2006 - 12:26 PM

Congrats Bruce and congrats to Pat for joining in all the fun of bowhunting. I hope his heart can handle it :lol:

Spot Hogg sights

BruceMc please show Pat the web sit above and the Hunter Hogg-it is real good and Real Deal is even simplier to use. Pins are very easy to setup or adjust and you don't need much force to set them and lock them in place. Pins are reasonably bright too. The horizontal and vertical setting on the Rea Deal don't need any tools just your weak finger tips. But once set they don't move on you and they have slash marks to tell how far you are moving them in your adjustments. All have a level built in and are very tough and light.

Best of luck shopping for new stuff! It will be like turning a kid loose in a toy store.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#15 WayneBizzle

WayneBizzle

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 597 posts

Posted 17 December 2006 - 09:05 AM

I'm still pretty new to the archery game. I have made a couple of changes from this season getting ready for next.

Bow - Still the same. BowTech Tribute set at 70# with a 29.5" draw.

Sight - HHA-Ol 5500 1 pin. Still up in the air with the 1 pin sight, but I love the fiber optics in this one. Looking hard at the different No-Peep sights on the market.

Rest - QAD Ultra-Rest Pro Lock Down Fall Away. Great rest when set up correctly.
The first one was set up where I bought the bow. Kept having problems with it. Notified QAD and they stated that this problem had never been reported, but they made everything good. Had another one installed at a different shop and have had nothing but good go with it.

Quiver - BowTech 8 arrow

Arrows - Was using the GoldTip 55/75's with a 100 gr. broadhead, but was getting inconsistent groups and quite a bit of arrow noise in flight. Learned that I should be shooting a 85 gr. head with this set-up. Did some some looking and deciced to switch to Easton ST Epic 400's. I can stay with the 100 gr. broadhead with this arrow, and so far it is going good. Groups have tightened considerably.

Broadheads - Slick Trick's in 100 gr. These babies fly just like a field tip. I also carry some Muzzy 4 blade 100 gr. along.

Switched from a large peep to a medium peep. May do away with the peep altogether though.

Would love to have a dealer close enough to get a Whisper Creek bow set up and shot to check them out. Have heard a lot of good things about their bows and their customer service.

So far the overall performance of this set up has done me right. Still tuning and tweeking though. Searching for perfection. Of course, there is that little matter of human involvement. :D

Edited by WayneBizzle, 17 December 2006 - 09:15 AM.

Posted Image




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users