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Chocolate Question


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#1 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 06:29 AM

Mine's not here yet, but I've shot my neighbor's chocolate. He had the thumb releas very high. I moved it very low and close to the handle. I suppose the correct way to trip the thumb release is to position it such that flexing the back muscles trips the trigger. Even in both positions and a few inbetween I couldn't get that to work. I'm gently squeezing my thumb in toward the release to trigger.

Any wisdom or advise?
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#2 Jeremiah

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 12:25 PM

Mine's not here yet, but I've shot my neighbor's chocolate.? He had the thumb releas very high.? I moved it very low and close to the handle.? I suppose the correct way to trip the thumb release is to position it such that flexing the back muscles trips the trigger.? Even in both positions and a few inbetween I couldn't get that to work.? I'm gently squeezing my thumb in toward the release to trigger.

Any wisdom or advise?

Where the trigger is located on a thumb release will depend on the size of your hand and where on your fingers you hold it. For me, my trigger is fairly high off the release because I hold the release low between my first and second finger joints. So, I have more of an open hand with the release dangling on my finger tips than a closed fist made around the release. Of course, that may change as the poundage shot increases. (For many, the higher the poundage, the higher they have to hold the release on their fingers.) Regardless of how you hold, you should be able to wrap your thumb around the trigger barrel without feeling a need to reach for it at all. It should just be there once you're anchored and ready for it.

Now, there's about half a dozen different ways of firing a thumb release. While I am a believer in back tension, don't let anyone tell you that it is the only way to fire a release and be accurate. George Dixon, who's been fairly successful as a pro archer ( :rolleyes: ), fires his thumb and pinky trigger releases by slowly making a fist and hinged releases by rotation. (Which if you were to ask around likely everyone would tell you that firing a hinged back tension release by purposely rotating your hand instead of using pure back tension is wrong! Go figure.)

Personally, I use a bit of a combo involving back tension and relaxing my hand. First, back tension for me is more about making sure I stay on the wall than anything. When I try to shoot without it I almost always end up creeping. So, I've gotten into the habit of drawing with my back and keeping the load on it. (Those muscles are bigger than your arms anyway and you will hold more steady.) Now, the actual tensioning, for me, is more of a bringing my right elbow from right to left if you were to view me from behind. It's not an equal squeeze of both shoulder blades together as this causes the bow to move to the left for a right handed shooter. Some also find their best results thinking of things as more of a "push-pull" method (pushing the bow toward the target and pulling back with their release arm). The hand relaxing for me comes from having fired a hinged release a lot. For anyone who has ever used one, you know you have to draw the bow with your thumb and index finger unless you want to punch yourself in the mouth. Once you're at full draw, aiming and executing your back tension, if you simply start to relax your index and middle fingers keeping your thumb wrapped around the trigger barrel the release will fire (even without back tension).

I've found through observation that more archers shoot with some form of hand movement/relaxation than even they realize. So, I don't fight it like some suggest. To me, I'm at my best when I can stay relaxed completely through the shot. If I'm fighting something or over-thinking you can just forget about any kind of decent score. I'd say with your scores you don't need to worry about changing what you're doing. Whatever it is, it's working. :lol:

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#3 Spirithawk

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 07:41 PM

Gee, I thought you guys were debating candy bars. Knew it wasn't Ho Ho's cause Larry didn't post. ;) :lol:

Edited by Spirithawk, 31 January 2007 - 07:42 PM.


#4 Whitetiger

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 11:58 PM

I thought it was about the new cell phones on tv. though ho hos are better. :lol:

#5 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 06:30 AM

My neighbor tried to eat his - not meant for human consumption.
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26




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