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#1 Spirithawk

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 01:42 PM

Was just wonering how many use blinds while turkey hunting and if you prefer using them? Jason and I have considered using ours but to be honest we like to stay mobile.

#2 Eric

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 02:05 PM

You know SpiritHawk I have never used one but I may if I would buy one. :lol:

And hunting with PA I think he's blind sometimes. :rofl:
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#3 Leo

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 02:42 PM

There are few things I am more certain about.

Even if you don't use a pop up blind, if you don't take the time to at least add some makeshift concealment to your set up, you will miss out on birds you would have otherwise harvested.

Being mobile turkey hunting is HIGHLY overated. In fact I am absolutely convinced that 99% of the time being mobile works against the hunter and simply educates the birds. I've worked as many as nine different gobblers from the same set up over the course of one day. More than once the same blind location has yielded multiple birds in the same season. I've long since gotten over the urge to chase one that's gobbling 300yds from my set up. Confidence in your scouting is paramount.

Scouting enough to find where the major activity hubs are and placing the blinds accordingly is absolutely crucial to a successful setup.
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#4 cayugad

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 02:43 PM

I have an outhouse blind for that reason (and deer hunting too) and have never used it. As easy as the blind goes up and down, I find that sometimes I must move to continue calling to give the gobblers the idea that I am on the move, like they should be (headed to me).

What I have done is went to a full face camo net, camo gloves, and everything else (except the rifle). I like to lean into a tree with my back to the direction they should be coming from and let them walk past me.

Of course this never happens. I set up and they come straight across the field at me, watching my and they decoys the whole time. Sure does make for some heart thumping....

I do keep the blind with me, just in case it is one of those wet, rain days. Then I might use it..
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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 06:05 PM

I have hunted from a pop up blind, a net blind, a brush blind, and have been caught where there was only a tree to sit against. I recall shooting a turkey from each of these setups. The brush blind will not allow much movement so you had better be pretty well set up before the turkey get in sight. The net blind allows movement below the level of the net but very limited movement above. The pop up on the other hand allows for movement whether the birds are in range or not. I recall several times in Kansas where I sat right out in the open and had hens and jakes walk by within a few feet and did not pay any attention to me at all. Of course I was not interested in shooting any of those very close birds but it sure was exciting having turkeys within 5 feet of me. I still wonder why they did not hear my heart beating at that distance as I could hear it quite well. I do have to agree with Leo patience is paramount in turkey hunting.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 17 February 2007 - 06:30 PM.

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#6 Spirithawk

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 06:49 PM

There's no question that patience kills turkeys but there's a difference between patience and sitting there wasting your time. Also, like Paul said, it's not you that spooks them , it's your movement at the wrong time. Who has turkey hunted and not had a bird hang up and simply refuse to come in? You can either call it quits and hope to get on the bird another day, sit there calling till you're blue in the face and educate the bird to a call, or do as Cayugad said. We all know how smart a old Tom can be. If a hen keeps calling from the same spot, for a long period of time, it doesn't take him long to figure out it's a hunter or at least that something isn't right. By moveing just a few yards he's hearing what he his tiny brain tells him he should be hearing, a hen working it's way closer to him ( That is what I mean by being mobile), and like Cayugad also noted, full cammo is a must. Jason and I leave no bare skin showing at all, in fact he wears a full Gilley suit and uses only mouth calls to reduce the need for movement. It's not easy, and you must judge each situation by it's own circumstances, but it can be very rewarding when your plan comes together and that wise old bird is suddenly in your sights. It's like the differance between hunting from a tree stand and still hunting. Both have their place, and both can be rewarding, but I get more satisfaction at beating the quarry at it's own game, when the oportunity is there, than taking the easier route and it has sure worked for us. We know the flocks in our area and their routines and we tend not to just hunt turkeys but to hunt a specific bird or birds. Our interest in a blind is so that we can take Jason's youngest boy and film his hunt as he's never killed a turkey.

Edited by Spirithawk, 17 February 2007 - 06:53 PM.


#7 cayugad

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 07:41 PM

Just because you have a young hunter and want to film it, then I would use a blind.

I took a neighbors kid turkey hunting once. What a riot. I explained over and over to him about the need to sit still and not move, or to make only slow movements if he had to.

The first time two hens came out of the thicket heading to the decoys, I could hear leaves rustling. His leg was twitching and shaking and his toe was rattling leaves like the devil. Needless to say the hens left.

When I asked him why he moved he was shocked because he was sure he didn't. I asked him if seeing those hens was exciting, and as he was still trying to get his breath under control, he kept grinning at me. I thought the kid might be touched in the head. We never got a bird that day, but we had a lot of fun and still laugh about our big turkey hunt adventure.
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#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 08:27 PM

My grandson is the very reason my son-in-law bought his blind. Last year although he is still too young to pull the trigger he loves to be there with us. I recall once we were sitting behind the net and the turkeys went the other way and after about a half hour I looked over to Nathaniel and he was curled up against his dad fast asleep.

Last year my son-in-law set up his blind for the first day near the roost. He and Nathaniel sat in the blind and had two gobblers show up first thing and Nathaniel became very excited and told his dad to shoot both of them which is legal in Kansas. His dad wanted to save one tag till I got there but went ahead and shot both gobblers from the blind. Nathaniel still talks about that hunt.

As for moving on a Tom, I am very reluctant to do that. The reason being nearly every time I have moved on a bird the bird answered from where I had just left. I may move too far before calling again I don't know but moving has only once got me the tom so as much as I don't like to do it, it does have merit.
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#9 cayugad

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 08:42 PM

I never move far ... I usually work the edge of a corn field that has a stand of jack pine on one end and some hickory and oak behind me. I work along that edge but like to keep the decoys always in range.

Although last time I looked, someone put some holes in my hen decoy. Wonder who did that... :rolleyes:
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#10 Phil

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 06:39 AM

I plan on getting one this spring to try. It'd be nice in the spring rains that seem to occur every blue moon :ermm: when I'm hunting, and I think with a Thermocell bug thingy it'd be fairly free of critters trying to access my pearly white underparts.
Mobility is the one drawback as we can only hunt until noon, and a coyote busting through your set-up can ruin the morning's chances for several hours so changing location is the best option. Heck, as a turkey hunter you never have enough stuff !
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#11 Spirithawk

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 09:48 AM

That's another good point Phil. We can only hunt till noon here too and old Wile E. tends to show up now and then which, as you said, ruins the hunt. Jason and I don't move very often, on a bird, and when we do it's usually only a few yards but now and then you have a bird that just won't come in and eventually moves off, so it's nice to be able to move to another location. Turkeys in our area aren't real hard to find. We pretty much know the areas they roost, water and feed and we are not limited to any one area. We have one old bird that Jason has missed, for one reason or another, for about 4 years now. He'll go 30 lbs, or better, easy. This old bird is one smart cookie and won't come to a call unless he sees a hen, and then very reluctantly because he has his own harem. We've finally found where he roosts and Jason swears this Spring is his last. As Jason said to me, " It's personal now Dad!" :lol: This old bird lives across the road from my house so I've seen him more than a few times. It will be tricky getting in close, without getting busted because of a steep climb up to the ridge ( and no this bird will not travel down off of it but instead travels it's length), but hey that's what makes it fun. ;) Anyways, we are taking Brent, Jason's boy, over to the Drury-Mincy Wildlife area, you guys may remember me talking about, for youth season. There we'll have 1,400 acres, with about 50 food plots, to hunt. We know where to find turkeys there and figure the blind would be the best way to go to 1. get him a bird and 2. film it.

Edited by Spirithawk, 18 February 2007 - 09:50 AM.


#12 jlaws

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 09:35 PM

o yes that longbeard will have a date with my smoker this spring. !!!!

#13 Eric

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 09:44 PM

Jason you do realize we want to see pics don't you. :lol: :yes:
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#14 jlaws

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Posted 19 February 2007 - 10:41 PM

You will all be the first to see the pics. I just have to keep dad from shooting it before I do.

#15 Spirithawk

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 09:34 AM

It's alive!!!!!!! :lol: Hey there son. Don't let Jason kid ya guys. That turkey is his and ole Dad wouldn't think of shooting it. I'm having too much fun sitting back watching the show. ;) I'm betting Jason get's him this Spring, if he hasn't already died of old age :lol: . If jason does get him you'll hear him whoop no matter where ya live. :yes:




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