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First attempt a string building


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#1 Leo

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 09:14 AM

I have an old Hoyt Fastflite which was badly in need of new. It's a 1992 model bow and was one of the very first fastflite system bows Hoyt ever made. As a result, it's way over designed. Most bows from that era can't take the new super strong super low stretch strings but this one can. It's was way ahead of it's time. As recent as two years ago this very same bow was sold as the reflex caribou (it's different now).

Anyhow, I decided it was a good project bow. I decided to tie new strings and cables for it myself. It was an interesting project. I learned alot.

The most important thing I learned is I'm not gonna build a bunch of strings. :lol: It takes my busted head self quite awhile to accomplish.

I decided to use Brownell's TS+ material and their diamond back serving. Note: the TS+ is different from the TS1. TS+ is pure dyneema. TS1 is a Vectran/Dyneema blend. Brownell no longer makes TS1. They have replaced it with XCEL.

It's important not to confuse TS1 with TS+. TS+ strings need FOUR more strands than TS1 to make a bowstring. You can get in trouble in a hurry building to the wrong spec.

TS+ strings need to be 20 strand strings.

IME, 100% dyneema strings outlast vectran blends hands down. The creep period is more tolerable to me than a string that fuzzes and breaks down.

Here are some pictures of my work.

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Yeah, I know. Mono color strings are out of style. But I really wanted to build this string out of one continuous fiber. I'll let you know how they hold up.
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#2 WayneBizzle

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 10:22 AM

Looking good Leo.
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#3 Jeremiah

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 11:55 AM

What size end serving did you use on the string? I've seen several modern strings with "standard" end servings pop right off the cam lobes at full draw on vintage Hoyts. Right where the string goes over the lobe of the cam, the string track actually ends. :doh: (Usually it's remedied w/ small servings and a diamond file to make the string tracks in the cams a little longer/deeper.)

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#4 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 12:18 PM

Leo looks great. If that's your first attempt I can't tell.

Pro string does a great job for the money. Which brings up something.
Leo one question, do you have the equipment to build a string and cable? I was talking to my on pro shop guy recently about this and he was looking into doing this himself. The cost of the equipment was what stopped him doing custom strings and cables.

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 07 March 2007 - 12:29 PM.

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#5 Leo

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 02:44 PM

What size end serving did you use on the string? I've seen several modern strings with "standard" end servings pop right off the cam lobes at full draw on vintage Hoyts. Right where the string goes over the lobe of the cam, the string track actually ends. :doh: (Usually it's remedied w/ small servings and a diamond file to make the string tracks in the cams a little longer/deeper.)

I used .022 serving for the center serving and camtracks.

You are correct, the .022 serving is too fat if you wind over the end loop serving. The solutions are:

1. Don't serve the end loop. Yes you can get away with that. In fact the string I took off was made just that way. You need to make the end loops very small to get away with this. .022 is all you need for this strategy.

2. Use .011 serving material on the end loops and don't overlap it with the big stuff. The .022 is OK if there isn't any overlap. If you overlap a portion of the string that goes over the cam lobe, it will pop out EVERYTIME. One of the things I learned ;) BTW, 8/30lb Powerpro braided fishing line is .011. It's really good for fine detail serving, I've used it for years on bowstrings, to install accessories and chaffing guards. It's 100% dyneema as well, but since it's surface fused has outstanding abrasion resistance.

I used option 2.
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#6 Leo

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 03:16 PM

Leo looks great. If that's your first attempt I can't tell.

Pro string does a great job for the money. Which brings up something.
Leo one question, do you have the equipment to build a string and cable? I was talking to my on pro shop guy recently about this and he was looking into doing this himself. The cost of the equipment was what stopped him doing custom strings and cables.

No I don't have an expensive string jig. It would be nice if I was gonna build several strings of different sizes.

What I did was make a HARD JIG using the original string as a template. That's cheap and easy, but not what you want to do for building multiple length strings. I built two jigs, one for the cables and one for the string. Nice thing about that, now I'm set to make new strings for that particular bow basically however long I have it. Bad thing, I can only make those strings. You can also permanently mark your peep and nock position plus serving lengths. If you're gonna build strings for yourself only, it's probably the way to go.

However, I don't want to get into how to build hard jigs. I simply don't want anyone getting hurt trying it. But suffice it to say, with an original string as a template and a decent grasp on geometry it's ridiculously inexpensive. You absolutely must be extremely precise making these. That's what scares me from sharing this, it looks oh so simple on the surface. You can, unfortunately, screw up oh so bad.
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