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G5 Montec broadhead


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#1 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 07:32 AM

I know several of you more experienced bowhunters use this broadhead. And the sharpening process can be an issue with it because out of the box they don't feel very sharp.

How and what do you use and method to put a scare sharp edge on them?

Thanks for the help.
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#2 McBruce

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 09:36 AM

The first thing to remember when dealing with G5 broad heads is that the bevel angle is not what most are accustoming too.
Woody can address this with more authority then I can, ( since he and I have discussed this )
but the angle / bevel on the G5 is something like 36 deg. compared to a standard hunting or skinning knife which is at 22 deg.
The less angle gives a longer slope to the edge and makes the edge feel sharper.

The more blunt angle will not feel as sharp however you have a much thicker base under the edge and this makes it stronger.

Now you also need to keep in mind how the broad head is working compared to a knife. The knife you want for skinning is for a lengthy process and is used with long smooth slicing strokes.
The broad head on the other hand is made for a penetration cut. It makes ONE slice directly into flesh. That thicker bevel gives you additional strength when you hit bone, to help keep the cutting edge more intact.

The example woody gave me was a wood lathe chisel has a 34.5 deg angle I believe. You can cut yourself in a fraction of a second with one that has been taken care of and is honed, but it won't feel like the edge of your skinning knife.
However would you lay your skinning knife on the rest and try to turn out a table lamp from some oak stock? Your knife wouldn?t last too long in that application, but it feels sharper? Shouldn?t it cut the wood better?
Now if your in back country and really need a shave...ya might use your skinning knife, but you wouldn't use a lathe chisel.

The whole point being, both are sharp, and both would cut flesh, one just doesn?t feel as sharp. This however does not mean that the one which feels less sharp is not better suited for the job it?s designed to do.
When slicing through rib bones, I think I would prefer the thicker blade and more blunt bevel then a thin razor blade which could snap off prior to doing the job its suppose to. (I know I do, I shoot the G5s)

Now for sharpening them. I have a flat diamond stone and a leather strap.
Equal number of strokes per side and you keep the bevels uniform. Then a few strokes across the leather strap to take any burrs off and they are ready to go.
I usually run them point forward the length of the diamond stone say 10 strokes. turn the broad head 1/3 and another 10 strokes, repeat for the 3rd side and you have now done all the bevels.

your G5's will NEVER feel as sharp as your straight razor. And they will never feel as sharp as replacement razor blades for your other broad heads. But will those thin razor blades hold up to the pentration if you hit bone going in, also question the type of animal you are hunting.

use the correct tool for the correct job :)
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#3 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 10:49 AM

The reason I asked I had some older G5 montec heads and tried them this past week and they flew better than the other fixed blades I have tuned in. So - - I was thinking of using them in June on my bear hunt. But the sharpness of them just didn't impress me and I knew Bruce and Leo used them. I knew also you guys figured out the method to touch them up or even better than out of the box.


Bruce thanks! Use the right tool stricks true to me. And flying dead on at a 1/2" dot at 40 yards is also a confidence builder.

Is it June yet???
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#4 Leo

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 11:12 AM

Learning to resharpen them is a crucial skill.

I think Bruce covered the how to very well. This is an added bonus. Once you get good at resharpening them you can shoot them into a foam target a couple times. Know exactly where they hit. Resharpen them and go hunting, with THE SAME ARROWS AND HEADS YOU JUST PRACTICED WITH.

You can also resharpen the heads and kill multiple animals with the head until you loose or break it.
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#5 McBruce

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 11:31 AM

Rowdy:
Using the diamond stone and the leather, will put a very sharp edge on them, using a good knife sharpern set and going over them will hone it down even more.

Here is what my G5 looked like after it when through the lungs & heart and then stuck into the far side leg on exit.
It did break the leg bone after going through the bear.

the bear went a total of about 30 yards and expired inside of 40 seconds of the shot.
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Oh and you might need the right fishing pole ;)
this is an example of why I keep going back to BBIL this is Mark T my hunting partner from my first trip up there in 03
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#6 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 07:32 AM

Fishing AH now you have done it, gone and changed the thread to fishing. :rofl:


Man that's a great pike Mark's struggling to hold up. A real wrist breaker!


I have the right equipment :rolleyes:
for fishing and bought some of those red hooks Leo adviced us on and can't wait to give them a try. :fishing:

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 14 March 2007 - 07:36 AM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#7 McBruce

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 09:03 PM

whitefish lures and Musky Killers :) toss in some red devils, 5 of diamonds and some green spoons and Im all set :)
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#8 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 23 March 2007 - 08:05 AM

Rowdy,

I'm on my third season now with G5 Montec and tickled to death with them. I've killed a truck load of deer, a ram and a goat with them and they cut through like butter, leave buckets of blood and chissel through bone like McBruce said. I don't use them on turkeys because you don't want penetration on a bird, you want impact.

I keep a flat stone and leather in my bow case. Every other trip or so during season I'll give them the once over before leaving the truck - just because.

About tuning. I've always used an 0-ring to tune my broadheads to the fletch even though they say you don't have to. Recently I shot some for practice with no o-ring and they flew just fine. I'll still do it because I'm just that way, but I don't think you have to tune them.
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#9 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 11:13 AM

I picked one of the G5 sportsmen sharpeners at the deer and turkey show several weeks back. I tried them on the montec 100 and I think it works great. Pretty easy to use too.


Have anyone else tried this sharpener?
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#10 Leo

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Posted 14 April 2007 - 05:29 PM

I haven't Rowdy. A quality Smith's abrasive diamond stone does my Montec's just fine.

G5's ASD (arrow squaring device) is a worthwhile investment no matter whose broadhead you stick on the end of your arrow.

Broadhead squareness is a killer even inside 25yds. Once you get the squareness right FOC takes over after 25yds. If FOC is different between your broadheads and fieldpoints it is physically impossible for them to impact the same spot beyond 25yds. They may be within inches but not same POI.
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#11 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 11:05 AM

I haven't Rowdy. A quality Smith's abrasive diamond stone does my Montec's just fine.

G5's ASD (arrow squaring device) is a worthwhile investment no matter whose broadhead you stick on the end of your arrow.

Broadhead squareness is a killer even inside 25yds. Once you get the squareness right FOC takes over after 25yds. If FOC is different between your broadheads and fieldpoints it is physically impossible for them to impact the same spot beyond 25yds. They may be within inches but not same POI.

Leo I wish I cut my own shafts so I could square them with the G5 ASD tool. I have a couple shafts I feel probably need to be shaped better. I turn the nock on the shaft and it makes a difference on POI. I'm guessing it's the other end that isn't squared right. Next bunch of shafts I buy maybe I'll have them cut them but not put in the inserts so I can square them up. ;)

I use the smith double sided abrasive diamond honing tool too. Works great but after I used it I'll slide a broadhead thru the sportsman G5 sharpener it puts a crazy sharp edge on it.
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#12 Leo

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 03:58 PM

Rowdy,

The ASD will square up aluminum or carbon insert faces quite nicely. Even if the shafts themselves are slightly off, squaring the face of the insert eliminates that issue. (Unless they are off more than the clearance in the threads.)

Same is true on the nock end, unless you're using pin nock inserts.

Don't be afraid to get the ASD because you think it's too late to help arrows that are already made. That simply is not the case.

The ASD will not fix a hacksaw job on a shaft. It's not designed to take off that much material. So it's no substitute for a good arrow saw. But for fine tuning arrows that were for the most part done right it's a hands down winner.

Edited by Leo, 19 April 2007 - 03:58 PM.

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#13 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 20 April 2007 - 08:28 AM

Rowdy,

The ASD will square up aluminum or carbon insert faces quite nicely. Even if the shafts themselves are slightly off, squaring the face of the insert eliminates that issue. (Unless they are off more than the clearance in the threads.)

Same is true on the nock end, unless you're using pin nock inserts.

Don't be afraid to get the ASD because you think it's too late to help arrows that are already made. That simply is not the case.

The ASD will not fix a hacksaw job on a shaft. It's not designed to take off that much material. So it's no substitute for a good arrow saw. But for fine tuning arrows that were for the most part done right it's a hands down winner.

I learn more things here and I definitely appreciate you sharing this with me Leo. You just made me put this on my wish list. :doh:
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."




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