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Bow string in slow motion


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#1 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 12:03 PM

Bow string in slo mo

One - is his form to extended? Is his forearm to straight or overdrawn on his bow? And would an STS or custom string suppressor help?

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Edited by Rowdy Yates, 24 March 2007 - 12:04 PM.

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#2 huntfromthesoul

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Posted 24 March 2007 - 02:07 PM

I'm no expert but I think his draw is set too long. His arm should have a slight bend in it.
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#3 Leo

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 05:34 PM

Yes an STS would help that. Especially since the string doesn't contact his arm until well AFTER the arrow has left the string. The STS will definitely take out the string oscillation much faster. That will cure what's happening but it won't cure the problem.

Don't think this guy is overdrawn or has bad forearm form.

What I think is happening, he is shooting an arrow that is very over spined with fingers. It appears his finger form needs some work. Or he's using a glove that's very wore out. I remember folks shooting with fingers "hooking" in to the crease on their first finger joint, then rolling the string out of it upon release. That causes the nock point to vibrate out of plane. It will give you a forearm raspberry every time. He probably got to the overspined shaft because someone thought he was getting slapped by an under spined shaft. Probably made it worse. An overspined shaft makes sure almost all the oscillation energy stays in the bowstring. (oops)
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#4 RobertR

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 07:31 PM

I have to agree that this person has to long of a draw and the elbow is not bent and it is kind of buckled up fron the presure from holding the bow. I also agree that the arrow and the release is a factor also.
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#5 mudduck

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Posted 26 March 2007 - 12:33 PM

I had that happen one time while tuning a Jennings Carbon Extreme set at 90lbs. Almost immediately i had a Swelling purple blue blood blister from elbow to wrist and was about an inch and a half thick. Didn't hurt right away, at least until the feeling came back. Almost instant technique improvement after that though,lol!

#6 bonecollector34

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Posted 26 March 2007 - 02:27 PM

When I was learning to hunt with my bow, I did that a few times as well.

It stings just a bit...


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#7 basile j

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Posted 27 March 2007 - 06:37 AM

I have to agree that this person has to long of a draw and the elbow is not bent and it is kind of buckled up fron the presure from holding the bow. I also agree that the arrow and the release is a factor also.



Yep, use to do it all the time and had to always wear mine arm guard. I changed my grip and release and still hit my bow hand at times. Hopefully... I will soon change my draw length. :yes:

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