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#1 runNgun

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 04:56 PM

Does anyone know the difference,if there is any, between a CVA Kodiak and a Kodiak Pro? The only difference that I can see is the price.THe Regular kodiak is less than the Pro so there must be a difference. I have about $50 saved up from doing things around the house so I think a muzzleloader will be my next investment, so does anybody own a kodiak or know anything about it? I'd also be willing to consider any other brand or model of other ML that wouldnt make me keel over when I see the price(less than $250 would put any ML in danger of me buying it).


Thanks a ton
Run
-Eric

#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 07:15 PM

Run I just went to CVA and compared the two. The more expensive rifle offers a 1 inch longer fluted barrel and as far as I can tell a thumbhole stock in several choices along with a few other bells and whistles.

If I were like you on a strict budget I would be looking at the New England Firearms muzzleloader. My reasons for this is I have not had the best experience with CVA and Traditions guns both of which are made in spain. The New England rifles are american made and seem to have a great warranty. I have read posts by those who own the NEF rifles and they like them.
My inline is an older model of Knight rifle called the bighorn I really like that rifle and I only paid $200.00 for it. It is not set up for shooting the 209 primers for ignition but for about $60.00 I could convert it but have no reason to do so as I do not shoot magnum loads.
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#3 runNgun

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 07:59 PM

Thanks PA, I really appreciate it :) I will keep the huntsman and sidekick in mind, If anyone else has any experience with CVA, go ahead and voice your oppinion.






Run
-Eric

#4 cayugad

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 10:15 PM

CVA & Traditions along with New Frontier, Winchester, and some other companies are made and marketed by the same parent company basically, called BPI (Black Powder Products Inc.) The barrels are made in Spain.

I am sure that if you do a search of BPI safety concerns the "magic barrel pressure issue" will surface. It boils down to a degree of barrel pressure safety testing done on them before they can be sold out of Spain and shipped out of country. Basically to markets in the United States and Canada. BPI rifles are the top selling rifles in the black powder market because of their price.

There are many thousands of satisfied customers shooting CVA and Tradition rifles. To them the whole barrel issue means nothing other then they load them appropriately, using common sense and stay within the barrel makers recommendations.

Would I recommend a CVA or Traditions rifle? Good question. I used to all the time a while back. I have since changed my tune for personal concerns. I own a CVA Staghorn magnum .50 caliber but never load it in a magnum manner. I keep the powder charge at 100 grains or less, the rifle shoots accurate, and I feel safe. But back to the question of recommendation of BPI, well their customer service is excellent. But I think for the money, there are better options out there. The NEF Sidekick is one of them. Also on auction sites, there are many used Knights, and Thompson Center rifles being sold for excellent prices.

I have read some of the horror stories (on other forums) of BPI products failing shooting factory recommended loads. The Kodiak in fact was one rifle that failed. When I asked what happened I got the same story as always. The trouble is when you ask for verification of the story facts you are told the same thing. BPI settled with or is in the process of setting with the victim and there is a gag order on the settlement for fact findings, etc. It means the case is settled and no one can tell the real truth about what happened because of legal agreements. It is a legal way to protect the name of the parent company.

It sounds like if the Kodiak is your interest, then you want a break open design. If you do decide to go to a BPI product, take a .50 caliber. The reason is the .45 caliber produces much higher barrel pressures then the .50 caliber with comparable loads. .45 calibers can be much harder to determine good load development although that fact is improving now. Also the selection in the .50 caliber for projectiles are much greater. .45 calibers are not legal rifles in all states. Some States have a minimum .50 caliber requirement. Also the .50 caliber can now if wanted loaded all the way down to a .40 caliber (10mm) projectile and still give exceptional accuracy. Also if you get a BPI product pay attention to the load recommendations. Do not exceed them or decide you want to test something that is not allowed. This goes for any brand of rifle you might purchase...

Good luck with your rifle search...
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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 08:19 AM

Excellent words Cayugad as usual.

I am prejediced against those BPI offerings a fact I will readily admit and most times have a terrible time suppressing. The issues that our family has had were not barrel pressure or accuracy related. Infact one of the CVA rifles was a real tack driver. My issues are operational and attachment issues which a decent quality control would never have let out the door.

Besides having so much fun with the american made products has really slanted my views toward those offerings.

Run my best advice is to check all the offerings out there and when you find something you think will fill your needs and desires make the actual cost of purchase a secondary item. Most times spending a few more dollars at the beginning will save a whole lot of the same overall. Satisfaction and confidence do not have a price tag.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#6 runNgun

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 03:01 PM

Thanks cayagad, it is true that I was looking at a CVA for the price,and they dont look to shabby from the outside. I was on the NEF website looking at the sidekick and it would get the job done, and because of the price-I could probably be hunting with it this fall. But then again I could get a TC or a Knight which still might be a better idea. If you cant tell already my mind is at a gridlock.

Thanks PA and Cayugad for your help :yes:


Run
-Eric

#7 cayugad

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 03:41 PM

I know the problem you're having.. that's my reason for owning so many rifles.. I just never could make up my mind on which one I wanted.
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, a total wreck with a big smile on your face."

#8 Spirithawk

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 02:52 PM

One thing I'll add. With a Knight or a T/C you don't have to wonder if you've got a good rifle. You'll know it! ;) :yes:

#9 Pittsburghunter

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 05:25 PM

I always have to add this to these threads. "Don't forget to look at the MDM Quicshooter as well"

My son owns one a nice shooting rifle made in the USA in VT with an action very similar to the NEF rifles. He got it and you can get one as well for under $200 with the stainless barrel.

#10 runNgun

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 07:01 PM

I always have to add this to these threads. "Don't forget to look at the MDM Quicshooter as well"

My son owns one a nice shooting rifle made in the USA in VT with an action very similar to the NEF rifles. He got it and you can get one as well for under $200 with the stainless barrel.

I'll have to check them out too. I was on their site and it looks like a fine rifle, haven't heard much about them though.

THANKS
Run
-Eric




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