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Dead on accuracy


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#1 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 02:21 PM

I read this and thought I'd share this with our group of bowhunters. I think it makes a lot of sense and for some of us newer bowhunters it gives us some direction to perfect practice.
A natural transition will take place when finally, because of the daily practice and immersion in archery, your bow will become like an extension of your body. With this level of bow familiarity will come confidence.

For yet another slant on what it takes to achieve ?Dead On? accuracy, I talked with one of the very best shooters bowhunting has ever known. I would venture to guess that all serious bowhunters who have followed the sport over the past 10 years or so have heard the name Randy Ulmer. His accomplishments really don?t need to be validated, but they were when he was elected into the prestigious Bowhunter Hall of Fame a few years back. Randy made his mark years ago by dominating the 3-D circuit and quickly built a reputation as a great competitor with an uncanny ability for accuracy. When he talks bow and arrow shooting, I listen.

When asking him about his preseason shooting routine, Randy referenced the old adage, ?Practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.?

To try and achieve shooting perfection, he shoots the first five arrows and the last five arrows of the day from a distance of five feet with his eyes closed. Many small muscles in our forearms and larger muscles in our upper arms and back must act harmoniously to make the perfect shot,? Randy says.

He goes on further by saying, ?During a normal shot, aiming and concern over where the arrow is going to hit, completely occupies the conscious mind while the subconscious mind controls the shot process. In order to become more aware of what you are doing before, during and after the shot, you must remove the aiming process and the concern over where the arrow will hit from the conscious mind. Closing your eyes and standing a few feet away from the target will allow you to "feel" the shot. You will soon discover things you may have never known you were doing wrong and eventually you will discover what the "perfect" shot feels like.

Once you've experience this "perfect" shot with your eyes closed you can try to repeat it with your eyes open. If you can maintain this feeling, your shooting will rapidly improve. If you hit a slump, go back to shooting with your eyes closed until the feeling comes back.?

In general, for many of you I probably haven?t revealed any new or groundbreaking information here in this column. There is not too much cutting edge glamour involved with putting in practice time, but nothing is more necessary. Bowhunting is a challenge and to be successful you will need to punch the ol? time clock when it comes to practice. Bowhunting trophy big game is probably one of the most difficult things to do consistently, and I realize that for the most part guys don?t want to hear how ?hard? it is, they just want to know, ?How can I arrow a monster.?

About time for your daily practice session isn?t it?
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#2 paturbo

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 10:07 PM

I still do that myself. Some days I will only shoot 15 arrows all with my eyes closed just to get that feeling back.

MD

#3 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 07:19 AM

Thanks MD I was wondering if anybody else had practised this exercise.

I have read this before and tried it last fall. I went home last night and did the first five arrows up close eyes closed and ended my shooting with five arrows eyes closed. I'd say looking back all my shooting last night at 40 yards was a killing alot of foam. :rofl: But I did shoot better than yesterday. AND it does let you focus on what the shot feels like while not aiming.

I recommend at least trying it out several times for yourself.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#4 Bowdoc Jim

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Posted 13 April 2006 - 09:43 AM

Here at the store when it is quiet during the week I do that exact same thing no sight just.. Draw anchor and release with in a few feet of the target with eyes closed. That's how I learned to shoot back tension a month straight of nothing but eyes closed and being near the target wall.




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