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#16 watchmaker

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 01:48 PM

STREAMLIGHT TWIN TASK 2 L

It is easy for me to do an objective review of this light. I have been using a couple of them for two years, quite often (not exclusively because I own other lights also for everyday use).



The light has performed extremely well for me. The Twin Task uses for power two lithium 3 volts, 123 batteries, and it have two light sources, one xenon bulb of 72 lumens and three Nichia 5mm LEDís of about 7 lumens each.

The LED mode will last for 28 hours (I have to take the word of the manufacturer for this, because I havenít done a run time that long). And the Xenon bulbís run time will last for 2 Ĺ hours.

The light is quite comfortable in the hand and similar to others 123ís lights, measuring 1.34Ē wide and 5.43ď long, and weighing at 3.37 oz.



Due to the micro-faceted reflector, the flood with the three LEDís or the Xenon bulb is ample. If you donít have to illuminate things at a distance the light is useful for chores inside the house or in the campsite or trail.

I have used it mostly with the three LEDís and I have come to believe the run time of 28 hours claimed by the manufacturer because after two years of sporadic use the light is still going in the same battery set.



The switch is on top of the head, as this is not a ďtacticalĒ light I found the switch convenient, so does my wife, that have the same model but in Titanium finish.

The focus is adjustable, but even in the tight setting the light have a lot of flood. I have lend my second light to my hunting pal Frank, that left it on the three stand for a week, on returning the light it was just the same in finish having weathered the week without any mark or discoloration. So, I didnít have any problem dunking it for a couple of hours in a big glass of water to see if it really was waterproof, and yes, it was, so far at this depth.



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The beam shot at 26 yards using the xenon bulb doesnít look impressive at all, and that is because the reflector is designed for extreme flood, but that is okay, this light is mostly for using indoors, walking the dog or for hiking a trail at the most.



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In this picture one of my Twin Task have a Velcro tape, this match with the Velcro in my baseball cap, and allow me to have my hands free for doing any chores while directing the illumination where I am looking.



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The street price is about $32 USD and I think that it is quite reasonable for the quality of the product, based on my experience with it I can recommend it highly.



Best regards

Watchmaker




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#17 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 06:02 PM

Thanks Watchmaker I have seen several ads for this light and each time wondered about its functionality sounds like a keeper.
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#18 watchmaker

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 10:47 AM

THE FENIX T-1

TACTICAL LIGHT

Fenix has come out with a new LED tactical light. It runs on two 123 batteries and outputs in the high setting 225 lumens for 1.5 hours. In the low setting of sixty lumens it lasts, according to the instructions, 10 hours.

This new light uses a Cree Premium Q-5 7090 XR-E that is said to make 225 lumens. It could very well be as it trounces every other LED light that I have in the stables, including my darling E2e modded with MacGizmo PR T head.



The light output is really impressive for an LED; it even has a very decent throw that is sufficient for tactical use inside and even outside.

I have tested it against other tactical lights like my Surefire Centurion III with P-91 lamp (200 lumens) and it really compares very well, to the point that I will carry from now on the new T-1 instead of the Centurion III.



My neighborís door is 50 yards away and the light illuminates the target quite well. The package says that the range is 200 yards, which is an exaggeration, and I canít see any illumination at a target placed 200 yards away. My regular testing for long distance is a hydrant at 88 yards and a group of trees at 111 yards. This light will illuminate the hydrant, barely. I can see that the outline of the hydrant is there (The same with the Centurion III) but I canít make out any detail or see it sharply. If the target were a human at that distance, I will be not able to tell if it is a bad guy with a gun or a nun with a cell phone.



My incandescent rechargeable Bear Cub light at 220 lumens can illuminate the hydrant and the group of trees at 111 yards and go beyond, It is well known that incandescent provide longer range and better definition. Granted the Bear Cub has a bigger reflector and the light itself is longer at 9 inches.



THE BEAR CUB 220 LUMENS, THE FENIX 225 AND THE SUREFIRE CENTURION III WITH P-91, 200 LUMENS



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The T-1 has a massive head with a wall of 4.5 mm thickness, and the light is quite heavy in comparison with other tactical lights. But it is the price you pay for running an LED at 225 lumens, as all this mass of metal is needed to divert the heat away from the batteries.

You may know that the LEDís unlikely incandescent that throw the heat forward as infrared, accumulate heat near the source of light, that is why they have to have a heavy heat sink, this heavy head act as one.

Otherwise the heat will reach the batteries and when a certain point is reached the internal protection that the 123ís batteries have, will cut down the juice, and stop the light.

So, they advertise the light as been built like a tank, but now you know what is the real reason behind all that metal at the head.

The light is say to be waterproof and it passed my four hour test in a BIG glass filled with water. Now in winter is no way that I am going to test it further by doing some diving.

I love the switch; it is just have the right feel for the momentary action, so good that it can be strobe as fast as you want if that is your cup of tea for tactical encounters. It is permanent on by clicking it, and can be unscrewed to put it in safe mode for when you carry the light in luggage or back pack.



The tail cap of the switch has a hole for a lanyard that is included and you can stand the light on its tail cap on a flat surface for a candle mode. What you cannot do is use this light with the Roger-Surefire or cigar grip because the rubber button is recessed flat with the tail cap.

Inside the package I found a spare button and O rings, I applaud that move by Fenix, and it is appreciated as some of us use the lights hard.



The T-1 comes with a holster, which is okay, but it also have a sturdy clip that grasp my belt very well and lower the profile on your waist in comparison with the holster. The only thing about the clip is that it rubs on the body of the light when you want to access the low mode of 60 lumens. We will see how good is the hard anodized type III as the clip is rubbing against the light with a good pressure and I suspect will be soon marked by a line.

BEAM SHOT OF THE THREE LIGHTS ABOVE, 26 YARDS RANGE, CAMERA AT 12 FEET



FENIX T-1



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SUREFIRE CENTURION III WITH P-91 LAMP



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BEAR CUB 220 LUMENS



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Anyway I think that the Fenix T-1 is one of the better lights that have hit the market lately, it is very rugged and is very well made, and well worth the price of 76 USD that I have paid for it.

Regards

Watchmaker








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#19 watchmaker

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 05:12 PM

THE ARC AAA FLASHLIGHT

There is a type of very small LED lights (called key chain light) that is ideal for police officers who have to write a report or a ticket. The light is very flood like and not very powerful at 5.5 lumens, it will not affect night vision much and will illuminate the pad very well if the light is clipped to your hat or epaulet.



The little ARC is small and almost weightless, it measures 2.7Ē long and 0.5 ďin diameter and can last for 5 hours to 50 percent output on a regular AAA battery.

The body of the light is 6061 aluminum with military hard anodized type III and coated with chem-cote in the interior.



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Cost of the light is $29.95 for the regular model and $44.95 for the Premium model that has a more powerful LED of 9 lumens.



The light is provided with a clip that will stay very well put on the brim of a hat or cap, it also has a split ring to attach the light to a key chain. Of course it also makes a good light if attached to the bill of a sporting cap when camping.



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There are some chores that require that you use your two hands, and the unobtrusive ARC is hardly noticeable until you need it.

As you can see in the picture, I use rechargeable AAA Nimhs as well as AAís. The new Nimh batteries are really powerful and have lots of capacity, 1,000 mah for the AAA, and 2700 or more for the AAís. They can be recharged up to 1,000 times which make them a great saving over using alkaline batteries.

Besides, you will be helping the environment as well as your pocket; I highly recommend the new rechargeable Nimh batteries.

Cheers

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#20 watchmaker

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 05:10 PM

HUSKY 2D 3 WATT LED LIGHT

I was at Home Depot and I spied a new light in the flashlight section. The new torch is a HUSKY brand, which is a brand name of Home Depot. I have used some of their inexpensive lights; they are made in China and represent a good value in some models.



The new light uses two D batteries (that are included in the package) and the source of light is a three watt LED. The difference in this torch is that the switch activates three different levels of illumination.

The package lacks any instructions and doesnít even mention the output of the light or the run time. So I am guessing that the first mode (the first click) is a 12 lumens light, second click at 40 lumens and the last click about 80 lumens.



The idea of having three different levels is good, it will conserve battery juice when you just need a little light for illumination, and at the same time, the other two settings are there for more lumens when you need to reach farther or put out more intensity.

As this thread is all about comparisons, I decided to pit the new HUSKY against a Maglite 2D LED 3 watt that I bought a few months ago. I purchased the Maglite from Wal Mart for $24 USD, but I think that it was on sale at the time, still price wise the two lights. Compare.



The HUSKY is ĹĒ shorter, otherwise they compare physically to each other and they weight the same, although the HUKY have a slightly smaller head.

The outside of the Husky is finished in a slightly duller anodizing than the Maglite; both lights look handsome on the outside.

In the inside the Husky shows the threads of the tail-cap, body and head very rough. Removing the head I found an adequate heat sink, although the mounting of the LED looks a little lousy. I wanted to take a look at the reflector and plastic lens, but it was not possible to remove the bezel despite my superhuman and my weight-lifter friend efforts - the bezel seems to have been super-glued in place.



The tail-cap sports a flimsy lanyard that I will not trust to hold the light for long, and looking inside at the switch, I found it very cheesy looking, more appropriate for a toy than for a flashlight. The little strip of metal where the battery makes contact with the switch, it doesnít look good either.



The Maglite 2D on the other hand, is a high quality product with butter smooth threads, a switch that will last forever and a lot of well thought-out features (cam action, self cleaning switch, etc).

The Maglite is an American product that should cost much more of what it does now. Old timers may recall that when they first show up in the 1980ís the price tag was $60 USD and that they were selling like hot cakes, the engineering of the Maglite was at that time well above any of the existing lights, including the Kel-Lite.



In the picture you can see the Maglite 2D LED on left, the Husky light in the middle, and the red one on right is a Black Bear 720 lumens, (1 Ĺ million candlepower) a custom made light that shows how much illumination we can put into a Maglite ďhostĒ 2D, with a little ingenuity, and if the people are willing to pay the price of a custom product.



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Here are the beam shots for comparison, 35 yards to the fence.



HUSKY 3 watt



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MAGLITE 3 watt



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BLACK BEAR 720 LUMENS



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My impression is that the Maglite has a much better beam, in color rendition and in intensity. Also, I can throw the beam of the Maglite much further than the Husky, even that both lights are 3 watt, the Maglite is better in quality of LED and power.

Granted - the Maglite has a 2Ē full reflector, while the Husky could be only 1 ĺ ď that could account for the better throw, but the Maglite definitely has a whiter beam and it is more intense.

All the best


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#21 watchmaker

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 03:40 PM

Q-BEAM MAX MILLION II

TWO MILLION CANDLEPOWER

SPOTLIGHT

I very recently bought a new Q-Beam two million candlepower spotlight. I am a big user of spotlights, in my case I use them to give demonstration of the power of the Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight, in police reunions, night shots, and seminars.



When my eight month-old battery for my two million candlepower Optronics spotlight gave up the ghost, I had to get a new spotlight.

I spied the Q-Beam at Wal-Mart and I bought it on the spot. It is a large spotlight with a four-and-three-quarters inch reflector, and with some extra features not available in other spotlights.

For starters, it comes with two removable batteries. One battery could be on the light while the other is charging, a good feature. Unfortunately, in my case, one of the batteries was already dead and is not recharging. I will have to return the unit and get another, hoping for better luck.

However, bad batteries are nothing new in big spotlights. It seems that the Chinese havenít gotten the hang of making lead acid batteries last any decent amount of time. I know; I have the corpses of seven spotlights to prove it (some day I will get around to rounding them up and take a picture of them).



I can safely say that I have tried all of them, and I can tell you that a quality spotlight is not available in the USA, unless you buy one of the Australianís Night Force spotlights. Australians, with their liberal night hunting laws, know a thing or two more about night hunting and lights that the average American hunter does.



For law enforcement the panorama is different. With the advent of the Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight (12 ĹĒ long, 28 oz) a spotlight in the cruiser is no longer needed.

After all, spotlight use for law enforcement is confined to operation from the car, which is why you donít see a trooper conducting a traffic stop with spotlight in hand or chasing down a suspect with one in tow.



Coming back to the Q-Beam Max Million II, it also has another feature that was not available before in any other spotlight; a double trigger that when touched high, can activate mechanically a spring that will push the smaller part of the two-part reflector/ bulb holder, forward. This causes the focus to change to a wider flood; interesting concept, but perhaps of dubious utility. I have seen it employed in flashlights before, but by the use of two filaments positioned in the bulb envelope at different heights.



Here is a picture of the Q-Beam together with the Borealis



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Unfortunately the Achillesí heel of any spotlight is the quality of its batteries. In the normal use that I give them, they never last more than 6 to 8 months, which is why I am not looking to pay more than half a century note for one, with is just what the new Q-Beam cost me at Wal-Mart.



How does it compare with the Borealis 1050 lumens (two million candlepower)?

To answer that question, I move them to the backyard of my local church, where I have a solid wall of trees and a range of 35 yards (I try to avoid solid light-painted walls that produce too much reflection and confuse the camera).



Q-Beam Max II Spotlight



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Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight



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Black Bear 720 lumens flashlight



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The new Spotlight did well in comparison, but it is more inside the range of the Black Bear 720 lumens (10 ď long 23 oz) than of the more powerful Borealis. Here are the pictures for you to judge; of course the Borealis and the BB 720 are better law enforcement tools as the side spill is bigger and the intensity and the color are brighter. Of course, you need side spill to avoid panning a tight focusí light and losing precious seconds when clearing a room or warehouse.

For those that use the Q-Beam for varmint shooting (with a partner to hold the light of course) the light will do okay up to 300 yards.

For that use you can take advantage of the red filter (at shorter distance) and the other two filters, ( blue and amber), are completely useless for varmint shooting and for any other use I can imagine, as I can not see a blood tracker using such a big spotlight with the blue filter on it.



Respectfully,

Watchmaker
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#22 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 04:54 PM

Thanks Watchmaker I am planning on getting a new spotlight and this one seems to be just fine. I have a 500,000 plug in now and as you said something like that restricts you to inside the vehicle use. Here in PA we are still permitted to spotlight deer at night till 10:00.
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#23 davepross54

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Posted 20 July 2008 - 07:43 PM

very interesting

#24 watchmaker

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 02:23 PM

THE UTG BARREL MOUNT




Hi guys,
For those wanting a barrel mount for a flashlight or laser, I have had good
results with the UTG barrel mount.
Initially purchased for an AK rifle, I found out that it can be mounted in
other rifle barrels, for example, it fits perfectly in a .22 rifle and also in
a Mini 14 I have.

It is a tri-rail mount with three Picattiny rails that will also accept Weaver
style rings. My model is the #2 mount which have two slots; the UTG is also
available with five slots that will accommodate the red dots scopes that are
in the market.

Picture of the UTG # 2



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]

Another view



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The UTG fully loaded with two TACM III tactical lights (one with a red filter)
and a laser.



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The UTG is sold by Cheaper than Dirt and I imagine others places that cater to
tactical rifles. Just look in their catalogue in the AK accessories page.

Cheers
Watchmaker








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#25 watchmaker

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:37 AM

VERY INTERESTING ARTICLE BY JAMES MAURER

ON THE BRIGHTEST LIGHTS IN THE WORLD

THAT YOU CAN GET OVER THE COUNTER.

THEY ARE ALL THERE

THE TORCH, THE POLARION, THE BOREALIS,

THE SUNFORCE, ETC.

READ IT IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN LIGHTS

http://www.jamesmaurer.com/worlds-brightest-flashlight.asp

CHEERS


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#26 watchmaker

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 12:58 PM

REMOTE SWITCHES

WITH PRESSURE PAD

Hi guys,

I have been using remote switches in my tactical lights that are mounted in rifles, shotguns, and bows, for quite a few years now.

The most effective of them are the ones with a direct connection to the solder pad that touch the battery (no spring), like the ones in the TACM III tactical lights.

The reason that they are more effective is that they donít rob the system of any voltage (in the way of internal resistance) as do the ones with heavy springs.



Internal resistance is the name of the game, some of them, for example the TAC STAR pressure switch, can really make a bright lamp like the P-60, looks dim and murky, due to too much internal resistance in the design of the tail cap.



THE TAC STAR REMOTE SWITCH



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A good one that I have used for years in mounting lights on my friendsí bows and rifles, is the G&P tail cap with remote. Its design is quite good and the internal resistance is low, but it is not designed for pump shotguns as the cord is just straight and not curly.



THE G&P REMOTE SWITCH



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A very good one that I discovered recently is the Aimshot curly cord remote, the spring is copper and quite light and it seems to have very low internal resistance.

I discovered the Aimshot in Cheaper Than Dirt catalogue and at a very good price ($14.97) and it has become my favorite.

I just used one in a Pelican M-6 tactical light and mounted it using a UTG Tri rail mount in an AK rifle, it does the job well.



THE AIMSHOT REMOTE SWITCH



Posted Image



Cheers

Watchmaker








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#27 watchmaker

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 08:16 PM

THE 200 LUMENS BATTLE

There are now a number of aftermarket lamps for the popular series of Surefire lights.

They will fit the Surefires series: 6P, C, Z, D, G, and maybe others.



I just received a new one that claims 290 lumens and is called a Cree R-2 (itís supposed to be even more powerful than the Cree Q-5).

I decided to do a shoot out with an assortment of lights that I have in the 200 plus lumens class. That way the members can see how they perform against each other.



Run time was not measured for lack of time and because I am running short on 123ís batteries. The bigger lights, namely the Surefire M-4 with the MN60 lamp (225 lumens for 60 minutes on four 123ís disposable batteries) and the Bear Cub from Black Bear Flashlights (220 lumens for 90 minutes on rechargeable Li Ion batteries) are big throwers and with them you can see clearly objects 120 and 150 yards away.



On the other hand the small reflectors of the Surefires G-2, Centurion 2 and Fenix T-1 are dispersing all those lumens close by, creating a great flood.

Those pocket lights will be great to use as tactical lights by law enforcement personnel, and especially good at clearing houses, while the Surefire M-4 and the Bear Cub will make great lights for car, truck and the open spaces.



The literature of the Fenix states that itís good for 200 yards, it will probably make a reflective target like a stop sign glow at that distance, but it would hardly illuminate any other object. My perception from trials I made, is that this light as well as the others LEDís canít be count to illuminate (poorly) objects beyond 60/70 yards.





In any case, a lamp upgrade if you own a Surefire pocket light, is a good idea as any of them are more powerful than the stock incandescent lamp of 65 lumens or the stock LED lamp of 80 lumens.





The lights as they appear in the picture are, from left to right:





Surefire M-4 MN60 lamp 225 lumens for 1 hour (running on four 123ís batteries)

Bear Cub 220 lumens for 90 minutes, rechargeable

Surefire G-2 in yellow. It is 65 lumens for one hour with the stock P-60 lamp

Surefire G-2 in black, Lumen Factory lamp incandescent of 160 lumens

Surefire G-2 in green, Cree Q-5 by Deal Xtreme, 200 lumens

Surefire Centurion 2 in Jungle Camo, 290 lumens (claimed) with the Cree R-2 lamp

Fenix T-1, 225 lumens using a Cree Q-5 lamp



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And now the pictures, target is 20 yards away, watch also the amount of side spill as well as the throw.



SUREFIRE M-4 DESVASTATOR 225 LUMENS



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BEAR CUB RECHARGEABLE 220 LUMENS



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SUREFIRE G-2 YELLOW 65 LUMENS



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SUREFIRE G-2 BLACK LUMENS FACTORY 160 LUMENS LAMP



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SUREFIRE G-2 GREEN, DEAL XTREME LAMP CREE Q-5 200 LUMENS



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SUREFIRE CENTURION 2, CREE R-2 290 LUMENS (CLAIMED)



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FENIX T-1 CREE Q-5 225 LUMENS



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One word of caution with high intensity LED lights: most are not thermally regulated and they will suffer from their own heat if used for an extended period. They will get very hot and the tint will change. Short use of 5 minutes or less is recommended, especially in lights like the G-2 that has a plastic body and head.



All metal flashlights like the Surefire 6P are better at dissipating the heat, and in them a few more minutes of constant use can be achieved before the heat will damage the module.

The big heavy head of the Fenix acts as a heat sink, and this light can manage to run much longer without the heat affecting the module.



Besides, the Fenix has a second setting that will run the light at 60 lumens for 10 hours.

So, if you already have a Surefire you want to upgrade, the aftermarkets lamps are great.

If you need a new light look at the Fenix line.



If you need a truck, open spaces light, the Bear Cub is a great value as it is rechargeable and very bright as well as a 150 yards thrower.



Cheers



Watchmaker




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#28 watchmaker

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Posted 24 December 2008 - 11:01 AM

Merry Christmas to all
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#29 PA SILVERBACK

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Posted 06 January 2009 - 08:37 PM

I will Whole Heartily Say,, This is the MOST informative Topic I have Read on ANY Forum..

Very Well done :clap:
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#30 watchmaker

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 01:48 PM

Thank you for your appreciation of my thread, Silverback.



TERRALUX LIGHTSTAR 220

FLASHLIGHT

For the last two months, I have been using one of the Terralux Lightstar 220 lumens flashlights, which runs on two AA batteries.

This light has two settings on the click-tail cap; the first setting clicks on the light and emits 220 lumens for 1.5 hours.

The second setting of 100 lumens for 6 hours is accessed by softly pressing the rubber button switch.



The LED is a Cree RXE Q-4 and is controlled by a microprocessor for a constant light output. When battery juice is running low, the LED will flicker to let you know that is time for new batteries.

The unit comes with two Energizer AA batteries, a lanyard and a soft nylon holster. At an even six inches long, the light is quite portable and also features a clip to attach it to your belt or waistband.



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It is very similar to the popular 3 watt 80 lumens Ray-O-Vac Sportsman Xtreme (but is slightly longer as the click tail cap needs more room for the mechanism), and the head is smaller with a small orange peel reflector.



Due to the small reflector the beam throws quite a flood despite the 220 lumens figure. Small reflectors donít really have much throw no matter how many lumens you make the light puts out. However, it is quite adequate for most chores inside a house and practical, too, for walking the dog or a walk in the woods.



LIGHTSTAR AT 20 YARDS WITH THE 220 LUMENS



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LIGHTSTAR WITH THE 100 LUMENS SETTING



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The really nice thing about these lights are that they are very inexpensive to feed as they use common AA batteries. As I use rechargeable AA batteries in all my lights, it is even more inexpensive to use.

The dark green anodized body is quite resistant to scratches as the light is still like new even after a couple months of sharing my pocket with keys and coins.



Cost of the light varies depending where you buy it, but it is around $35 to $40 USD; your best bet is to Google it to see who has a special on it.

I like this light to the point of recommending it to anybody that is looking for a light with these characteristics. The light is as good as the Ray-O-Vac Sportsman with the added power of the 220 lumen setting.

Cheers.

Watchmaker








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