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Making Lures


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#1 runNgun

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:01 PM

Does anyone here make their own lures? I've made a couple dozen pre-painted spoons by adding hooks and split rings but that's about it. I thinking of getting blank spoons and painting them myself and maybe getting a jig-head mold but I'm not so sure I want to be messing around with lead. It might be fun to sell a few of them if they don't turn out too bad.


These are a pretty good deal on bulk spoons

http://www.luremaking.com/catalogue/catalo...ting_spoons.htm
-Eric

#2 irinman2424

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:24 PM

I used to dabble in making things like leaders and taking apart lures and making my own along with using the molds the key to making things with lead is make certain that you are doing it in a well ventilated area so your not inhaling the fumes and getting it in your blood steam with the right precautions you will be fine Ive also made some lead balls for muzzleloading and same thing there make certain that your doing it in a well ventilated area
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#3 Leo

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 06:46 PM

Playing with molten lead can be extremely dangerous. Besides the fumes spills and splatters can cause very serious injury.

A lot safer fun is molding soft plastics like worms and jig bodies.

Buy bulk heads and spoons and get good at painting those. Then you will decide if you really want to learn how to do the whole deal.
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#4 runNgun

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 08:50 PM

Thanks Leo, I was looking at soft plastic molds and it looks like a pretty easy process. That might be something I will want to try.
-Eric

#5 Leo

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 08:02 AM

You can make your own soft plastic molds easily enough.

Carve out the lure you want in wood. Give it a thorough coat of Car Wax. Let the wax dry to a haze and don't wipe it of. Then fill a small box with fast set two-part epoxy and push the template down in it. When it dries, if you've designed the shape right for molding you can pop out the wood template and start pouring soft plastics.

You will have a couple instances where the epoxy won't let go of the template. That's part of the learning fun. So don't get too creative at first when trying this until you get the hang of what you can and can't do.

The car wax I've found that works as the best "release" agent is Zymoil ;) You might find something better. Let us know and have fun.

You can also put some additives in the soft plastics that fish like. Salt and Vanilla extract are the most popular. Anise oil is another good one. I've always wanted to try Thai Fish Sauce but I know those will be some SUPER STINKY worms.
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#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 08:17 AM

Eric I fully agree that working with molten lead is dangerous and requires being an aprentice and working with someone that knows how to handle it first.

It can be done rather safely but you have to know about molten lead. I liken molten lead to a chainsaw both are an accident just waiting to happen in just one lax moment.
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#7 runNgun

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 12:02 PM

Thanks Guys! Leo, what kind of wood should I use?
-Eric

#8 Leo

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:18 PM

Basswood is pretty easy to carve.
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#9 REDGREEN

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 10:42 AM

I have made a few plugs over the years out of maple and out of birch with a dremel,saw and knife. I always make my own leaders and treble hook assemblies for the larger pike. I don't trust the store boughts at all for the 20+ pounders.I have a buddy that casts the leadheads all of the time, so I have never bothered with that. One plug that I made would hit the bottom in 30 feet of water. Same deal with the snelled hooks. I'd sooner tie my own than buy a set of pretied eagle claws or mustads. I also tie my own walleye rigs. I have had too many of the commercial ones fail on me. Leo is right on the money with the basswood being easy to carve, as it is medium hard and has a real tight grain. I have a few statues here that are made of basswood, and I like working with it. Have fun!




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