Jump to content


Photo

Life Expectancy Of Carbon Arrows


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 August 2007 - 02:24 PM

I have read on some other forums some notion that carbon arrows will loose thier integrity over their life time. Life being shot so many times over a year or two that the spine weakens? Does the fiber's in the carbon break down enough from the launch affect and impact that they loose some of their strength or original spine? :huh:

What do you think?
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#2 Leo

Leo

    Hunting Resource

  • Administrators
  • 3,155 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina

Posted 03 August 2007 - 03:28 PM

Actually the carbon fibers aren't what breaks down, it's the resin. Even then it's possible to formulate resins and load them with the appropriate amounts of fiber to achieve almost infinite fatigue life.

Orthophthalic polyester resin is the most economical resin. It does not do well with repeated exposure to water. Boating companies that tried to go on the cheap with this material several years ago paid dearly for that oversight. It is generally thought to have some longevity issues. I doubt (but don't know for sure) any of the major arrow manufacturers are using this resin at this time.

Isophthalic polyester resin is definitely considered the better choice resin for outdoor applications. It is not nearly as sensitive to water and has a good durability record.

Regardless what resin is used they all can be degraded by exposure to prolonged periods of sunlight. UV breaks them down. It takes extra additives which are not cheap to combat this. Though I'm sure camo coating does help.

Bottomline, if you don't get your arrows wet or leave them out in the sun a lot you'll probably break them in general use before they breakdown or you wear them out.
Posted Image

#3 mudduck

mudduck

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 980 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Interested in almost everything, unless it bores me, then I'm not interested anymore

Posted 04 August 2007 - 01:52 PM

I have never heard of carbon arrows just getting "old", however, I take a lot more care and caution with them than I did the aluminum arrows. I have never used the arrow again after shooting an animal, and I never have used an arrow again after missing a target. I closely examine arrows after shooting targets to look for damage to the arrow around the insert, flex test arrows constantly, discard any with scratches etc. Years ago in high school, I used to pole vault in track and got to use some of the first carbon-fibre glass poles that came out. Had one bust on me because of scratches. Later fishing poles came out in carbon and boron and the same thing, worked great until they got scratched-then look out. Maybe the carbon arrows of today are different, but I ain't taking chances, seen too many internet pics of shattered arrows in guys hands.

#4 Rowdy Yates

Rowdy Yates

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,632 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 05 August 2007 - 02:35 PM

Jeff I totally agree with you on inspecting your shafts every time you shoot one. Those carbon fibers are nasty once you have one stick in you.

Leo the resin thing never crossed my mind. Thanks and you're make sense about how they will be replaced before the resin factor gets into play.

Thanks Guys.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users