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Breakfree Clp For Cleaning Shotguns


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#1 Leo

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 09:02 AM

Let me tell you folks something. Every now and then a product hits the market that sets the standard for the competitors.

As far as I'm concerned Breakfree CLP is one of those products. I kid you not, I'm seriously impressed with this stuff.

CLP stands for Clean, Lube and Protect. It dries to the touch and still keeps everything slick. Because it is a dry lubricant it doesn't freeze or attract and collect grime.

I'm surrounded by marines where I live. Marines are first and foremost rifleman. They have to use this stuff on their rifles because it's the only lube that passed their standard. As a result the stuff flies off the shelves here pretty quick because these guys are buying it for their personal weapons.
Especially for cleaning Auto shotguns (or any auto weapon for that matter) I believe it has no equal. Trust me it's that good.
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#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:19 PM

Thanks Leo. I have several other CLP claiming products and they all leave a bit to be desired. I plan on Trying Breakfree.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
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#3 runNgun

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 02:51 PM

Sounds like a very cool product for sure :)
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#4 Leo

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 08:51 AM

Thanks Leo. I have several other CLP claiming products and they all leave a bit to be desired. I plan on Trying Breakfree.


Yep, there are quite a few "imitators". The Breakfree stuff is the REAL DEAL. This is THE SAME stuff the military uses on automatic weapons.

Though they also use it as a bore solvent, I don't recommend that use of the product on rifle bores. It's probably just fine and dandy for the bore of an automatic rifle. On a rifle you demand best accuracy from, IMHO, using a persistent dry lubricant in the bore is a NO NO. (Guess I'll have to post how I deep clean a rifle bore later.)

Using this stuff for cleaning a shotgun bore is just fine though. Just wet patch or mop and run it thru a couple times. Let the lube dry (about 5 minutes) and run the bronze brush through it back and forth about eight times.

Note: I always remove the shotgun barrel and work from the breach end, when cleaning a shotgun bore. Otherwise you risk driving the gunk you are trying to remove into the action and trigger group. If you don't do this, I guarantee you will eventually have problems. IMHO, this is something folks who claim they "KNOW" how to clean a shotgun often miss. If you want to see just how much stuff comes out when you clean. Hold the muzzle over a clean white sheet of paper while you are patching and brushing. I bet you take the barrel off every time after that ;)

About once a year after the end of the season. I do a deep clean. I'll first use a gun scrubber or just plain old "Brake Part" cleaner to degrease the internal parts of the disassembled weapon. Careful not to get degreasers on synthetic parts, especially fiber optic sights as degreasers will "EAT" fiber optics. It's important to degrease first. Lube upon lube upon lube causes issues. Then you can spray the parts down with CLP and put the gun together "WET"

Pump guns are easy. Knock out the trigger group pin(s) drop that out degrease and CLP it. You can then CLP the slide and bolt. Don't spray into the firing pin hole of the bolt unless you plan on taking the bolt apart. CLP the inside of the receiver and slides. Reassemble, work the action wet a couple times and you're done.

Auto's are more involved. The vent ports in the barrel have to be clear. The magazine tube needs to be clean, but if you degrease it, IT MUST BE DRY before you put the piston parts back on. The degreaser will eat synthetic piston parts. Never sand the magazine tube. Real fine Scotchbrite can be used, but be gentle. CLP on the magazine tube is a good idea. Same rules for the trigger group and receiver inside as pumps. Autos have a spring that closes the bolt. This is inside the stock. You need to remove the recoil pad to get to it. On a new gun, YOU HAVE TO degrease the tube this spring sits in and the spring itself. CLP both of those. New autos are typically shipped with protective grease in that tube. Your new auto won't work worth a darn until you get that junk out. You literally need to patch that tube out just like it's a rifle bore. There will be junk in there. Afterwards, cleaning that tube is an annual event. Always work the action a couple times after reassembly to be sure everything it alright.

Edited by Leo, 21 September 2007 - 08:54 AM.

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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 07:30 PM

Leo I do much the same thing with the rifles and shotguns I have used in the past year. I also at least once a year get out those I have not shot and at minimum make sure they are well oiled and show no corrosion. for those I usually just swab out the barrel and rewipe the outside and restore it in the gun safe.

Leo do you use a gunsafe? If so do you do anything to control the moisture in yours.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




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