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Stabilizer How Long Is Yours?


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#1 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 08:21 AM

I know target shooters use a very long stabilizer but bowhunting it's not practical. What's your thoughts on the right one for bowhunting?


I had a poll going here but it will not show.


Is your's a 4" - 5" - 6" -8" or a 10"?


And what make is your stabilizer and does it work for you?

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 18 October 2007 - 10:03 AM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#2 Jeremiah

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 10:27 AM

My personal hunting stabilizer is a 12" Specialty Archery Super Stix with all of the weight out at the tip.

I do not necessarily promote a specific brand or model of stabilizer. However, a "long", non-flexible, weight-forward design is key. (Preferably, one that is light-bodied with a thread system at the tip to add/remove/adjust weight. A sliding/adjustable weight system built into the stabilizer is nice, but not necessary as the weight should really be out at the tip anyway. Speaking of weight, we are talking ounces, not pounds!)

An Enlightening Article on the Subject

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#3 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 12:47 PM

Jeremiah thanks for responding. What once weight is the one you use? The one I'm using is 6" at 7 oz..

Great article by Spot Hogg and I read it on their web site some time back. That's one reason I posted this thread because of it and seeing some pro bowhunter's setups. Most of the average bowhunter's bow setup use a 4" or 5" one. I just saw a couple of better known bowhunters and their stabilizer where 10" models. Both of these pro bowhunters hunt out west and do more longer range shooting. Any eastern hardwoods bowhunter would consider 30 yards a max range and maybe it's due to the terrian and maybe it's their setup.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#4 runNgun

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 03:44 PM

I have a 3.5 inch mini S-coil right now but I do have some kind of black weight that the s-coil screws into that I bought at cabelas for a dollar that adds probably 4 or 5 more ounces. I'm good enough at 10 and 20 yards with the S-coil but I need the weight for 30 yards. Sometime I'll get a heavier stabilizer so I can have an all around set-up.
-Eric

#5 Jeremiah

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Posted 18 October 2007 - 05:42 PM

Mine is in the Ultra Lite series. It's very light. (Under 4 oz.) But, I use the heavy 1.44 oz. weights in tip and NAVCOM sliders.

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#6 WayneBizzle

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 04:46 PM

I use a 6" Lore and a 12" B-Stinger
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#7 mudduck

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 12:18 AM

I use no stabilizer for hunting, however, to do this one must sight in using no stabilizer. I don't like the extra weight nor the added length to my bow. I understand the reasoning behind stabilizers and when doing lots of target practice, the stabilizer does reduce hand shock and makes the shooting more comfortable on a day in, day out basis. Hunting is a one shot deal, and I have found no significant difference in my groups with or without the stabilizer out to 40yds. If one tends to hand torque a bow, a stabilizer can lessen the effect. I do not think that short stabilizers allow one to get on target quicker nor hold more steady. I'm not saying to not use one, but ask yourself why you think you need one.

#8 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 23 October 2007 - 07:32 AM

I use no stabilizer for hunting, however, to do this one must sight in using no stabilizer. I don't like the extra weight nor the added length to my bow. I understand the reasoning behind stabilizers and when doing lots of target practice, the stabilizer does reduce hand shock and makes the shooting more comfortable on a day in, day out basis. Hunting is a one shot deal, and I have found no significant difference in my groups with or without the stabilizer out to 40yds. If one tends to hand torque a bow, a stabilizer can lessen the effect. I do not think that short stabilizers allow one to get on target quicker nor hold more steady. I'm not saying to not use one, but ask yourself why you think you need one.

On the other hand I've seen several shows with bowhunter TV Pro's from Hunter Spec. and Prime Time not use them on their Mathews bow. I guess I see your point and obviously others do too. When I test shot my bows they didn't have stabilizers on them and they felt fine then. Personally I still like it to cut some noise down.



I kind like looking over other bowhunter setups - just call me a voyeur :lol:

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 23 October 2007 - 07:34 AM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#9 Leo

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 10:39 AM

To me the stabilizer is just to get a better balance for the bow. IE. the bow doesn't want to tip forward or back in my hand. If you achieve that you will get some torque control and it will probably be as much as you want to get out of a stabilizer. You can always go to the hardware store and get a "spacer" nut and the right size set screw to adjust how far out the stabilizer sits. I recommend this for models that aren't adjustable. When the bow sits level in your hand without touching it with the other you've got your setup balanced. Some bows are naturally more torquey than others. Grip design and riser design are crucial contributors to this. The accessories (sights, dampeners) also contribute. I believe going to a slimmer grip is a far better option than playing the stabilizer game. It's basic engineering common sense to reduce the undesirable force as much as possible before trying to control it. Going the other way is like trying to drive slower by applying more brake pressure versus simply letting off the gas. Obviously letting off the gas is the better option. People who go nuts with stabilizers are essentially pouring on the brake pressure. Trying to control forces in this way is always eventually doomed to failure. Something is gonna give.

There is a far too common belief that drop away rests "eliminate" torque. This is absolutely FALSE. Drop aways do not control the path of nock travel. If you torque the bow left or right it will affect the arrow regardless of rest style.

Stabs are IMHO way more important if your shooting form utilizes an open handed grip. Personally, I don't like the open handed form for hunting. A loose grip is harder to learn but for me it's much easier to track follow thru with a steady bow than one that I expect the wrist sling to catch. Try and keep the pin on target until after you hear the arrow actually strike. If that's hard to do. Then I almost guarantee you have an issue. If you master the loose grip and follow thru your groups will tighten up substantially.

If your bow design allows it. Try a "spitball" grip. This is ugly but extremely functional. Take the grip off the bow. Apply ONE layer of camo duct tape to where the grip was. Coat the duct tape with car wax. Don't wipe it off when it hazes. Wear a jersey glove (fleece gloves are even better) on your bow hand and try shooting like that. If the handle gets sticky, wax it again. The goal here is to make the grip as slippery and as thin as possible. Retape when you need too. This is a very effective, cheap and easy Torquefree grip. It's ugly but amazingly functional. So don't scoff at it till you try it. A fat pretty grip feels good in your hand but shoots like crap. I'd rather have a grip that looks like crap and shoots good.

The worse thing you can do to your hunting accuracy is hunt with a quiver attached to the bow. It's convenient but in my experience nothing screws up the balance of a bow worse than a bow mounted quiver. You wouldn't think of changing stabilizers after every shot but that's essentially what you are doing every time you take an arrow out of or put one in a bow mounted quiver. You are constantly changing the balance of your bow. It's practically impossible to get consistent when you do this. I switched to a hip quiver almost 20yrs ago and no way I'm ever going back to the "on bow" model. Hip quivers can also be tied to your day pack and easily attached to a tree. There are tube type sling quivers now that I haven't tried but really look practical. I could probably build one from PVC myself for cheaper than I could buy one. Eventually I probably will. But for now I can't emphasize enough the only arrow that's ever on my bow is the one I plan to shoot ;)

Edited by Leo, 26 October 2007 - 10:45 AM.

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