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Remington Model 597


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#1 Alden

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 11:58 AM

For Christmas, my parents got me my first firearm. A Remington Model 597 .22 Caliber Rimfire Rifle. The problem I am having with it is that my shells jam pretty frequently. I've fired about 70 rounds and it has jammed 6 times already. Now I am told that while this problem will continue for the lifetime of the rifle, but if I get some better clips and ammo it will reduce the times my gun will jam.

So my main question is do any of you have any ideas on what would be the best clips and ammo for my rifle or any other suggestions (besides cleaning because I do keep it nearly spotless).

Edited by Alden, 29 December 2007 - 12:16 PM.

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#2 Jeremiah

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 02:36 PM

Welcome "Alden",

I would check over the firearm to ensure all moving parts of the ejection are working properly. (No binding up or burrs on anything preventing normal function. Shooting itself can "break in" certain parts over time making for less issues.) I've had some issues with semi-autos over the years and the cause has ranged from extractor issues to, as you mention, even the ammo itself. Ammo is generally a trial and error thing.

If all else fails, take it to a good gunsmith. I've had a few Remingtons in particular (though shotguns) that went from sub par to fine at the hands of a good 'smith.

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#3 irinman2424

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 04:52 PM

I had a Remington 597 and had the same problem seems when I changed ammo to either Remington or another "name brand" and not the "cheepy oh this will work" ammo and with a few rounds through it it was fine
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#4 Leo

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 05:56 PM

It's a brand new auto. Many autos have "break in" pain. Honestly, 6 jams in 70 shots is pretty darn good for a brand new auto rimfire.

Keep it clean and keep shooting it. It will get better ;)
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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 06:46 PM

If the rifle was brand new when you got it I would look to see if there may be some grease or other lube keeping it from functioning properly. I would clean that bolt area very well and lube lightly.

Also a call to Remington to see if they have any suggestions.

I have a bolt action Marlin that did not extract the spent casing. I sent to a gunsmith and it works great now.
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#6 runNgun

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Posted 29 December 2007 - 08:35 PM

With my Mossberg .22, Winchester Wildcats would jam all the time to the point in which it was no fun to even shoot it. Then I switched to Remington's Thunderbolts and haven't had a jam since. I think it was because the Wildcats had more of an "irregular" shaped bullet which made it not cycle properly but the Thunderbolt's bullet is nice and smooth.

Maybe try a different brand in your gun and see if that works. A 50 round box is really cheap so you won't be out much if it does not work very well.

What brand of cartride do you shoot right now?
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#7 Alden

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 12:33 AM

Thank you for all the suggestions, I will give them all a try (couldn't hurt at least).

I am using is Remington Thunderbolt 22 Long Rifle Hi-Speed Rimfire cartridges, so I would think they should work fine, but who knows.

I'll see if I can't shoot off a couple hundred rounds and see if that breaks in. How many rounds do you guys suggest would be sufficient to break in my rifle?

One more question that's not exactly related to my previous problem, but deals with the same rifle. On top of my rifle I have a new Bushnell .22 Rimfire Scope that I'm trying to get sighted in, and am having a little trouble doing so. For starters, I have adjusted the windage and elevation over 20 notches, and yet my bullet pattern stays in the same area (moving no more than 1") at 50 yards. On the Elevation adjustment knob there is an arrow pointing clockwise that says "Up" and I'm wondering if this means it adjusts the scope up or if I turn it in that direction if my bullet should go up further? Any ideas?

Edited by Alden, 30 December 2007 - 12:34 AM.

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#8 Leo

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 09:56 AM

Some scopes, (not all) have this problem. Sometimes the adjustments get stuck even though you have turned the screws. Bump the scope a couple times (actually need to bump it pretty hard) with the heel of your hand on the turret block.

Keep in mind at 50yds on a 1/4MOA adjustment scope it takes 8 clicks to move 1 inch.

Edited by Leo, 30 December 2007 - 09:57 AM.

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#9 Alden

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 10:45 AM

Thanks for the tip Leo! I'll give it a try this afternoon.
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#10 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 01:58 PM

If you hve never seen the inside of a scope I'll try to describe what it looks like. First of all when a scope is opened (Do not do this as it ruins the scope) you will see a smaller tube inside the main tube. This inside tube is where the crosshairs are. it is supported by three posts right where you make the adjustments for windage and elevation. One post is totally internal and is spring loaded and holds the inside tube against the other two. When you make an adjustment to either the elevation or windage the the inside tube should be pushed against the spring loaded one to make the new adjustment and hold it there. if for any reason this spring loaded pin is a little sticky you need to do as Leo said bump it but only with your hand.

If this continues to happen contact Bushnell to see if they will fix or replace it. The only scopes that I had this sticking problem were the lesser quality scopes. There is nothing you can do to the scope to fix the problem so if it is not under any warrenty from Bushnell I would suggest save your pennies and get a better quality scope.
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#11 Alden

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Posted 30 December 2007 - 10:36 PM

Thank you, that was very informative. If all else fails, it should still be under warrenty since I got the scope for Christmas. As you probably can tell I'm still pretty n00bish when it comes to firearms. Hopefully it won't be long and I'll be at least a decent marksman with everyone's help.
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#12 Bob LeBlanc

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 05:33 AM

The Remington 597 is known to have extraction problems from its magazine.
If you go to the Remington site (I think it is in their FAQ section) they describe how to tune the feeding lip of the magazine which helps greatly.
Also, they are now offering a metal magazine that you can buy separately that is supposed to resolve the issue.

Bob

#13 BrandonT

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 07:07 PM

Alden,

Sorry I'm so late replying to this, but Bob nailed it on the head. I have the same firearm. When I used the cheap plastic magazine it would jam all the time. When I went and bought the metal magazine for it, it hardly ever jammed again. I use Federal cartridges, 36 grain hollow points in mine. Also, after every 100 rounds or so, I try to clean it like crazy, tearing it completely down and making sure everything is clean and then oiled lightly. Good luck though, hope you get years of enjoyment out of that gun. :)
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#14 Alden

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:20 AM

Thanks a lot for all your help. I've made some adjustments and got new clips and some higher grade bullets, now I am going to go test it out for sure this weekend. Wish me luck!
Perhaps the distant part of the sky always seems clearest so that we will always strive to reach it.
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#15 Leo

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:45 AM

Good luck!
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