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Metal String Loop


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#1 Jeremiah

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 09:50 PM

I just thought that anyone who still shoots a metal string loop (or who is contemplating using one in the future) for some reason might find this video interesting.



:o

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#2 McBruce

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 08:46 AM

OUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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#3 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 09:06 AM

To make a better video they should have done a comparison between the metal and the string loop.
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#4 Jeremiah

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 09:25 AM

All bow strings go similarly beyond brace when shot and oscillate back and forth several times before coming to rest. (And all faster than you and I can see it. :o ) Perhaps not as far forward as with a heavy metal loop. But, here's a pic of one being shot with nothing other than a tied on nock point...
Posted Image
That's still pretty far!

The difference with the string loop is that it doesn't matter a bit if it contacts anything as it's just made of nylon and/or poly/spectra blend etc.

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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 10:52 AM

Ok so now we have a comparison but without a constant such as bow type, draw weight, length of draw, arrow weight etc. Now don't get me wrong I am getting your point. Here is another question. Does the amount of pressure required to nock the arrow have anything to do with how much the bow string oscillates upon release. A very small mind wants to know.
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#6 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 11:12 AM

I had one of those metal D-loops on severals years ago now and it did make a mark on the naked arm when it would swing.

A custom string suppressors help some with the motion and the felt oscillation when shooting. Several are made for the after mark these days and some manufacturers are taking the lead and adding them to their product.

I was noticing the form the Mathew's shooter was using and his grip is a white knuckle style and he's missing a bow sling. Other than that I'm seeing a pro at work. His vision is locked on to the flight of the arrow and the target - no blinking there. ;)

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 16 January 2008 - 11:17 AM.

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#7 Jeremiah

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 01:26 PM

I didn't know we were looking to conduct a scientific study. :D

I've seen several different make and model compound bows come into the shops I used to work at with varying draw weights and lengths that have had "metal loop damage". (The worst I ever saw was a Mathews LX, which is the bow pictured above, that had been set up with a slightly high nock point. The metal loop had literally punched ruts into the roller guard wheels. I can't believe the owner didn't spot it and make a change sooner!)

Obviously, if a bow has a high enough brace height and the forward portions of string/cable are either far enough forward or pulled far enough off to the side it is possible to avoid contact. Several older bows still fit this model. (I worked on an oooollllld Hoyt ProVantage a couple years ago that had no problem. But, the bow had something like a 9" brace height. :eek: )

Slo-mo video footage of various compound bows being shot with various nocking points can be seen on YouTube.com. "Typical hunting set-ups" all seem to act/react pretty similarly, to me, in the "beyond brace" and oscillation department. (More weight on the string near the center tends to make for more forward movement.)

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#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 02:54 PM

Hey thanks for all the info. I believed enough in what you said about this previously to have the metal d loop removed and the string loop installed. Now if I could only pull the bow back without so much pain in the shoulders I could get back to archery shooting.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#9 runNgun

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 04:01 PM

If metal is that bad, why do companies even sell them? Is there that much of a metal loop following (or people who don't know better) that they can still make money on them?
-Eric

#10 Jeremiah

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 04:19 PM

If metal is that bad, why do companies even sell them? Is there that much of a metal loop following (or people who don't know better) that they can still make money on them?


If I, or anyone else, had an answer to that the world would be a better place. :lol:

I guess, like with anything, you will always have those handful of folks who come in with a bow that has the geometry to work okay with a metal loop (rare) that hasn't had problems other than a set of shiny release aid jaws that "swears by them".

Many shops refuse to even carry them though.

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#11 sschneid73

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 05:40 PM

Metal- Shmetal!!!! Never have I seen anyone using one of them critters at any of the shoots I have been to. Jer what was the reasoning behind it in the first place? I really don't see any benifactors for it.

Steve

#12 Whitetiger

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 09:04 PM

I had heard those metal loops wear your string down faster. and with a metal one theres gotta be a noise issue when its slapping off of the bow after the shot where string is silent.

#13 Leo

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 11:23 AM

The metal loops "help" align a peep. That's the ONLY legitimate advantage they offer.

You can absolutely get the same peep alignment help with a string loop. But it takes a little more effort and is a little tougher to accomplish than just loosening two screws and turning the loop.

This conveniance factor is enough for what I consider "lazy" archers to like about them.

In the long run these metal loops are harder on the bow and "eat" releases. Their initial conveniance costs you in the future.

If you want you equipment to last. Don't use a metal D-loop!

PA,

Yes, nock pressure can have an effect. Tight nocks can cause more oscillation. But it is also dependent on the cam profile as well. Typically I can easily pop the nock off the string, with the flat of my thumb pushing the back of the nocked arrow. Put three fingers under the arrow as if you were going to shoot with fingers, then simply press the back of the nock with your thumb. If it hurts to pop one off that way, the nock is usually too tight. I find this is a much easier way to gage nock tightness than trying to simply pull it off. The flat of your thumb is much more sensitive to the differences than you can feel by merely pulling it off. Try this on a bunch of arrows you have. You'll be surprised how quickly you identify the "tight" ones and too "loose" ones.

Edited by Leo, 17 January 2008 - 11:23 AM.

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#14 Whitetiger

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 11:33 AM

The metal loops "help" align a peep. That's the ONLY legitimate advantage they offer.

You can absolutely get the same peep alignment help with a string loop. But it takes a little more effort and is a little tougher to accomplish than just loosening two screws and turning the loop.

This conveniance factor is enough for what I consider "lazy" archers to like about them.

In the long run these metal loops are harder on the bow and "eat" releases. Their initial conveniance costs you in the future.

If you want you equipment to last. Don't use a metal D-loop!

PA,

Yes, nock pressure can have an effect. Tight nocks can cause more oscillation. But it is also dependent on the cam profile as well. Typically I can easily pop the nock off the string, with the flat of my thumb pushing the back of the nocked arrow. Put three fingers under the arrow as if you were going to shoot with fingers, then simply press the back of the nock with your thumb. If it hurts to pop one off that way, the nock is usually too tight. I find this is a much easier way to gage nock tightness than trying to simply pull it off. The flat of your thumb is much more sensitive to the differences than you can feel by merely pulling it off. Try this on a bunch of arrows you have. You'll be surprised how quickly you identify the "tight" ones and too "loose" ones.


How do you then fix a tight nock without replacing it should you find some in your quiver?

#15 paturbo

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 08:29 PM

I have seen metal loops cut cables and tear bowstrings apart. I have never used one but I do know some people who have used them and now have switched to the fiber loop.


turbo




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