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Knife Sharpening


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#1 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 06:08 PM

Now this subject is very near and dear to everyones heart. There are many different ways to put an edge on a knife and I have mine too but would like to hear from all of you on what you do and why.
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#2 paturbo

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 08:17 PM

I use the Lansky knife sharpening kit.


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#3 REDGREEN

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 11:37 AM

I have the soft and hard Arkansas, carborundom, synthetic, diamond and the lansky, as well as a few good steels. I prefer using the bench stones followed by a good workout on the razor strap. It's sharp, when a hair held between the fingers can be cut multiple times with a touch. That is the only time that I can split hairs and not get in trouble! :lol:

#4 Leo

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Posted 21 January 2008 - 07:43 PM

I'll give up a little secret.

The best thing I've found to put the final polish on an edge you're working on is the element from an industrial sodium lamp (ie. factory/warehouse light).

They are hard to get because those lights don't burn out that often and many places have only fluorescent.

All you need is one and it will last a lifetime ;)

The final polish is the trick to getting scary sharp. Rubbing compound (car store) on a piece of leather (messy) used to be my old standby.
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#5 Spirithawk

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 01:10 PM

Before becoming disabled I worked as an upholsterer for deck and bass boats. In cutting the foam for the seats and such, and trimming excess vinyl, an extremely sharp knife was a must. My boss, at the time, taught me how to use a shapening stone and I've been hooked ever since. One thing a person must realise though is that there are stones and then there are stones. The one we had at work was priceless in it's quallity. It took me years to find one of comparable quallity and I ended up tossing every single new one that I bought in the trash. I finally found a very old stone at a flea market and you couldn't buy it from me at any price. The key to using one is keeping it clean and lubricated and keeping the right angle of the blade to stone. In use the pores get clogged with the metal particles and the stone is worthless untill cleaned. I use a half and half mixture of mineral spirits and transmission fluid. Never found anything to work better. It not only cleans very well but keeps the stone in prime condition too. You'd be surprised at the metal you'll pick up after just sharpening one knife. There's a lot of new stones that work ok but the really old ones are worth their weight in gold. Next time you visit I'll show mine to you. Only problem I have with it is that it works so good that every mother's son and daughter brings their knives to me to sharpen! :lol: Another thing to keep in mind is what the knife you are sharpening will be used for. You can actually get a knife too sharp for some jobs. The sharper you get it, the thinner the edge and the edge can actually fold over if you hit something hard such as wood or bone. A knife can be too sharp for skinning purposes too. I've heard many outfitters say as much. Too sharp and it's too easy to accidently slice the skin when you don't want to such as caping a trophy animal. Sharpening knives is both a science and an art. I was lucky enough to have a good teacher but it sure spoils you. Few things iritate me more than a dull knife. :lol:

Edited by Spirithawk, 28 January 2008 - 01:14 PM.


#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 09:46 PM

I have waited for a while about posting to this thread as I thought more people would want to tell their knife sharpening story.

I will admit that I use a lansky sharpening system. My main reason for going that route is I never seemed to be able to hold a knife at the same angle for each stroke. I initially bought the regular lansky but have since added a medium and fine diamond stone. I always use the very fine lansky stone which is so fine that it quits after only 5 or 6 strokes. I now have knives that are sharp enough to dry shave the hair from the back of my hand. My only problem is when I sit down to sharpen 3 or 4 knives (a guy can't have too many) by the time I am done I have shaved all the hair off the back of my left hand.
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Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#7 Spirithawk

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 09:35 AM

Paul, I'll tell you how to tell a knife is sharp just by looking at it, thus saving the hair on your hand. :lol: In good light you sight down the edge of the blade. Anywhere you see it shine, the blade is dull. No shine...it's sharp...gaurenteed. :yes:

#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 02:09 PM

Now Spirithawk I judge my sharpening frequency by how much hair is left on the back of my hand. If I didn't dry shave my hand I would be looking for knives to sharpen. Since I have gone to the lansky sharpening system my knives seem to stay sharp longer but if I try to sharpen by another method it takes a long time to get it sharp and when I return to the lansky it takes longer also. I presume that it is all in the angle of sharpening.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




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