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Landscaping For Memories


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#1 Coalman

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 11:44 AM

A big draw for me in the spring woods is the beauty I see around me. Namely ferns and wildflowers. How many of us have walked on a blanket of flowering Dutchman's Britches? The trillium's, hepatica, trout lily and star flowers in full bloom? Have you ever seen so many violets?

I think it is time to admit I am a poacher. :shock: I like to take flower and fern samples home. I have a special 3' X 3' eastern exposure on the side yard. It is getting to be that time of year when the leatherwood ferns, Mayapple and cohosh I have collected over the years start to bulge out of the earth. They each remind me of a special place I have visited.

Very dear to me are the Jack in the Pulpit from the Lamprey River. The bulbs were taken from the crop of a special river bottom tom. I planted them and they grew.

I remember a few years ago a tom whipped my butt. The clump of false solomon seal remind me of that hunt every time I drive by with the lawnmower.

A blooming dogwood sends signals to my brain that scream spring turkey. I bought a couple from the nursery a few years back, :D , and planted them in the backyard. They have been asking for a red bud.

One of the most gratifying things I forgot to mention. I snap off the plant and only keep the root. You put them in the soil and they stay dormant for a year. But the next spring when you see the bright early flowers of the bloodroot your mind begins planning the landscaping again.



Anybody else "landscape for memories" :?:

Edited by Coalman, 05 March 2008 - 11:45 AM.

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#2 REDGREEN

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 12:39 PM

That's excellent, Coalman. I'm glad to see a horticulturist amongst us. When I was younger, we were into growing the gardens big time. The east side of our home was planted with ferns and peonies. The south side was totally tulips . The west side was tulips and glads. The north side was snowballs. Then, in between the four car garage/shop was a full garden of every concievable flower that was ever created. By the garage doors was a patch of daisies that was about 20' by 10'. Down the side of the garage was more peonies. We had a picket fence that ran east west from the center line of the house that was a full patch of peonies as well, both sides. The east lawn was clover, kept trimmed to about 1 1/2 inches. The buttercups were everywhere. Oh yeah, so were the mosquitos! :lol: I used to have a blast digging in the dirt. I miss the chestnut trees. They were sure pretty in full bloom. Had lots of cherry and apple trees too. Life was good back in the stone age.

#3 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 02:15 PM

I have done the same thing. I have to admit I'm a poacher too. <_< At my last home I planted all sorts of ferns from my spring time hunts, fishing trips or just hiking trips. One here and one there and after a few trips you have a great fern garden started. Unfortunely I had to leave it behind when I moved along with all the memories.

The lady slipper orchids I left where I found them. I have a soft spot for those but boy I'd love to have them growing in my shady gardens today.

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 05 March 2008 - 02:17 PM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#4 Leo

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 02:28 PM

DUDE! I know EXACTLY where you are coming from on this one!!!

In my front yard in the center of the azalea patch I have two dozen "memory plants".

These are all Texas Hibiscus. They are very special to me for several reasons.

  • The seeds were given to me by a hunting buddy in Mississippi. I sprouted these my self. I planted them, without permission. :lol:
  • My Mississippi buddy and I try to duck hunt Arkansas together at least once a year. One of my Arkansas buddies is in the hospital with terminal cancer right now. So these flowers will stir these memories as well.
  • The flowers origin is Texas where some of my best buddies and fondest hunting memories are. (And will yet occur)

In addition, I can't help but remember my visit to Hawaii when I look at these flowers. Since Hibiscus flowers are so common there.

These things grow eight inch diameter flowers and get to 7ft high. People stop to steal seed pods all the time. They really get folks attention. I'll post a picture when they start blooming. They do it constantly from middle of April through October. Really cool flowers.

I've also got a Eucalyptus because one day I'm gonna make it to Australia or New Zealand.

I would have loved to have snagged a Baobab seed in Africa but that would not have got over well in customs.
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#5 Whitetiger

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 10:00 AM

I love landscaping and working in my yard. I also keep orchids and am working on my first hybrid to name after my daughter. I always try to snap a photo or two when I go on a hunt. I have a spot in my yard that I was going to do this spring with ferns & jack in the pulpit. But now we're looking for a new house to move by spring so that plan has been put on hold. I have a raspberry fetish so I have 'poached' a few baby berry canes when Im lucky enough to find them. This year they finally gave fruit. MMMmmm good.

#6 Whitetiger

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 10:56 AM

Here are the two that Im hybridizing. I've got a seed pod developing right now so its looking promising. The seed pod will take 4-6 months to ripen then I will send it off to a flasking company which will grow them for 18 mnths or until ready to deflask. Then I get them back to plant.

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Edited by Whitetiger, 06 March 2008 - 11:00 AM.


#7 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 10:57 AM

Raspberries now that got my attention. They do grow wild here in the fence rows and don't bother me when they are ripe I try to pick them by the gallon. We greeze them for later. They arent as good then but much less expensive than the ones at the supermarkets.
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#8 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 11:09 AM

Sorry Coalman for running on about orchids.

I also keep orchids and am working on my first hybrid to name after my daughter.



Whitetiger I warn you orchids are addicting. I know I'm a recovering addicted grower. :blush: I'm a past president of the Central Ohio Orchid Society and have made crosses or hybrids and registered them with the American Orchid Society. I have since sold all of them when I moved from my last home some 14 years ago. I grow today a small few on a window sill and happy with those.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#9 Coalman

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 11:21 AM

These are all " Landscaping for Memories" posts. Please keep them coming. I enjoy them all.

I love ferns and wildflowers. I planted some vinca minor in the woods behind my dad's years ago. The ground cover is spreading well.

Pink Lady Slippers are the predominant species in my hunting area. I do know a place in NH I have seen a few whites. I can't wait to get back to this piece this spring. The pic was taken the last day of Maine's turkey season June 2, 2007. The whole side of the hill was in bloom. I will be back in 2008.
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Mayapple is not native to my area. It is a ground cover in some of the southern states I have visited. I am very proud of my little patch of woods weed.
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#10 Whitetiger

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 12:03 PM

Sorry Coalman for running on about orchids.



Whitetiger I warn you orchids are addicting. I know I'm a recovering addicted grower. :blush: I'm a past president of the Central Ohio Orchid Society and have made crosses or hybrids and registered them with the American Orchid Society. I have since sold all of them when I moved from my last home some 14 years ago. I grow today a small few on a window sill and happy with those.


Rowdy,

I got bit by the bug 7 years ago and its only getting worse (hence trying to make my first hybrid. Its a 4n to a species so Im nervous about it. people say it might not take because of the chromosome count). This is Blc. Chia Lin 'New City' AM/AOS and Cattleya auriantanica (the orange one)

Edited by Whitetiger, 06 March 2008 - 12:06 PM.


#11 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 01:33 PM

Rowdy,

I got bit by the bug 7 years ago and its only getting worse (hence trying to make my first hybrid. Its a 4n to a species so Im nervous about it. people say it might not take because of the chromosome count). This is Blc. Chia Lin 'New City' AM/AOS and Cattleya auriantanica (the orange one)


Yep I recognized both of the parents and you should be proud of yourself to get these to bloom again. You never know about the genetics when doing a cross but the registration books are growing exponentially with award winning crosses every year. Hey give it a shot. You'll be over run if the flasks turn out to be viable and the little rascals grow - you'll be potting them up and trying sell off your prodigy. Problem is not to sell of the award winning one. :curse:
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."




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