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Speed Nocks


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#1 Leo

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Posted 11 April 2008 - 02:33 PM

Bowtech's especially benefit from speed nocks on the bowstring in the right position. Usually the exact spot is in the manual for those bows. BUT, other bows benefit as well. I say right position because the distance from the cams is absolutely crucial in gaining any benefit. Too far or too close actually hurts performance. Somewhere between 2" and 4" from the cam will give you a significant speed boost.

You must have access to a chronograph to track speed while figuring this out for your bow or you are wasting your time. There is no way you can guess this. Way too many folks just arbitrarily clamp on speed nocks shoot through the chrono and announce they don't do anything. There is more to it than that.

On two cam bows, you must nock the string same distance from top and bottom cams. One cam bows the cam is the key, don't nock near the wheel.

Matthews bows have perimeter weights in their cams so speed nocking is usually futile. These cams have already been optimized for this benefit. But if you have a real long or real short draw it might help. Your arrows weight and silencers can also have an effect.

Start about 2 inch from the cam and shoot. Record the speed. Move the nock(s) out in 1/4" increments from the cam(s). You should see the speed increase and then decrease as you move out. Once it decreases, move it back to where it was the highest speed and apply a second nock to see if that helps. If it does apply a third. It might take one, two or even three but you can gain as much as 10fps if you do it right. I get around 8FPS.

It's not just speed either. The speed nocks really help calm the string down on release which obviously translates into a speed increase. The other benefit is accuracy. A calmer string, shows it's worth on the target.

Try it folks. It may really surprise you.
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#2 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 12:03 PM

Bowtech's especially benefit from speed nocks on the bowstring in the right position. Usually the exact spot is in the manual for those bows. BUT, other bows benefit as well. I say right position because the distance from the cams is absolutely crucial in gaining any benefit. Too far or too close actually hurts performance. Somewhere between 2" and 4" from the cam will give you a significant speed boost.

You must have access to a chronograph to track speed while figuring this out for your bow or you are wasting your time. There is no way you can guess this. Way too many folks just arbitrarily clamp on speed nocks shoot through the chrono and announce they don't do anything. There is more to it than that.

On two cam bows, you must nock the string same distance from top and bottom cams. One cam bows the cam is the key, don't nock near the wheel.

Matthews bows have perimeter weights in their cams so speed nocking is usually futile. These cams have already been optimized for this benefit. But if you have a real long or real short draw it might help. Your arrows weight and silencers can also have an effect.

Start about 2 inch from the cam and shoot. Record the speed. Move the nock(s) out in 1/4" increments from the cam(s). You should see the speed increase and then decrease as you move out. Once it decreases, move it back to where it was the highest speed and apply a second nock to see if that helps. If it does apply a third. It might take one, two or even three but you can gain as much as 10fps if you do it right. I get around 8FPS.

It's not just speed either. The speed nocks really help calm the string down on release which obviously translates into a speed increase. The other benefit is accuracy. A calmer string, shows it's worth on the target.

Try it folks. It may really surprise you.



Leo who makes these? I shoot a Mathews bow and have an average draw length so I probably don't need these but I'd like to look into them more.
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#3 Leo

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Posted 15 April 2008 - 12:46 PM

They are simply standard brass nocking points.

I don't know which Matthews you have Rowdy but that little damping arm a lot of them have probably won't like the nocks either. The perimeter weights on Matthews Cams serve the same "Flywheel" effect as speed nocks but they don't produce the same vibration dampening effect that speed nocks do. Their bows are optimized for the speed effect from the weights. You can still get some dampening effect with the speed nocks but you'll probably loose a little speed.
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