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Optics-spotting Scope Suggestions?


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#1 big bear

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 10:31 AM

I recently purchased a pair of Leupold Binoculars from Sportsmans trading post. They seem to have pretty fair prices and the service was great. Pretty neat looking site with a little feller sitting on a elk.All animated.I cross referenced with the big reatailers and their prices were better. I also picked up a Bull dog rifle case for my over seas trip this fall. Can't wait to shoot something. I'm also looking for a spotting scope. Does anyone have any suggestions on a good spotting scope for a reasonable price? Thanks alot

#2 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 11:04 AM

Welcome Big Bear! :hi:

Congrats on the new Binos. Leupold makes some awesome binos and scopes. If I hear of a deal on spotting scope I'll PM you.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#3 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 08:01 PM

Just my 2 cents but do not skimp on a spotting scope. With a rifle scope you look through it for only a minute or 2 at a time but with a spotting scope you can stare through it for hours. In my experience one more than 60 power is trouble, very difficult to hold steady and if higher than 60 power the image darkens even in broad daylight. Even with a very large objective lens the image is dark. With one at 60 power I can see a turkeys beard at about 3/4 mile.
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#4 big bear

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 06:40 PM

I was looking at a 15x45x60 Does that seam like a good fit for eastern washington where its wide open and mostly fields and big draws to look across? I was looking at either the Alpen, Leupold, or possibly a nikon. Thanks alot for the responses.

#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 09:01 AM

I would say that your power selection is great to pick apart the far hillside pockets. I wear glasses but remove them to spot. This gives me a bigger field of view. I also bought an eyepatch for my opposite eye. This relieves some of the strain of holding that eye closed for extended periods. I spot fields that go right up the side of the mountain where I live. They are about 3/4 mile away and I can spot whether it is a tom or hen easily and whether the deer are antlered or not. My son can even count points at that distance. My tired old eys cannot resolve quite as well but I can usually tell it is a branch antlered buck.
Even with all I do to relieve tension I still can get a headache or neckache after a couple of hours of spotting. This is more from viewing position than from optics though.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#6 mzlloader

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 11:03 AM

I personally do not use a spotting scope, I ues both swaro 15x56 or minox 15x58 s set up on a tri pod to do all my glassing with, I have found that spotting scope is not good for glassing at long distances, the spotting scope is great if you only use it once you have spotted an animal and you want to judge him a little better, but with high power binos you can do the same thing, plus you get a better field of view with binos over a scope, I have seen guys miss seeing alot of game trying to use a spotting scope to glass with, also using 2 eyes vs 1 eye of extened periods of time(I have been know to glass from the same spot for over 6 hours) will not give you a bad headach,

R L
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#7 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 08:18 PM

The 1000 yd competitors use two spotting scopes fixed together somewhat like binos. It works very well but would be too heavy to tote in the field.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#8 T-Wrecks

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 09:14 PM

I just purchased a Winchester WT-831 from Cabelas for $230. It is a 20-60x80, comes with a hard case, soft case, and a tripod. In the store, I compared side by side a Burris 15-45x60, that was 170 just for the scope, no case cause I asked the guy, tripods started at $40, I had to have the Burris practically touch my eyeball to look through it. The Winchester had some eye relief, maybe 5/8", and I thought the brightness was better, clarity at least as good. Also, It doubles for some pretty good astronomy side action, too. Great at the range so far, I wouldn't hesitate to take it to the field at all. I agree with Muzzle, scan with hp bino's and use the scope for what it was designed to do, specific long range precision viewing.

#9 huntingopticsxxx

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:49 PM

The 1000 yd competitors use two spotting scopes fixed together somewhat like binos. It works very well but would be too heavy to tote in the field.

But don't you think carrying heavy loads affect the shooting aim
Rifle Hunting Optics scopes were first invented back in the 17th century and were meant to give shooters optical aiming aids.

#10 TerryfromAR

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 06:50 AM

huntingopticsxxx welcome to Hunting Resource. Paul was talking about the long range competition shooters that shoot from a bench. 2 large spotting scopes are alot easier to set up next to a table at a range than they are to carry through a field when you're out hunting.
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