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Zeroing A Scope


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#1 Spirithawk

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 05:51 PM

Ok guys, this is probably a really dumb question, but when you zero a variable power scope does it matter what setting it's on? Lets say it's an inch high at 100 yards at 4x and you then go up to 9x, does it stay 1 inch high or does the extra magnification exagerate the distance it's off? I always hunted with open sights but age and poor eye sight dictates the need for a scope on all my long guns and I'm really not well versed in sighting them in.

#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 25 August 2008 - 07:28 PM

Norm a good quality scope will not change point of impact when you change power. I have a 6-18 power which I sighted in at a true 100 yds on 18 power. I also shot it on 6 power and did not have any change in POI. I was satisfied enough to not bother trying it on 6 power at 200 yds. I figured if I get a shot at 200 or 300 yds I will be on 18 power anyhow. That scope also has a parrallax adjustment on the objective lens. I wish it had a knob that I could see while in the shooting position.
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#3 Leo

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 11:41 AM

Always sight in at the highest power setting and if there is some error it will be minimized at the lower settings.

Parallax adjustment can really help. Actually try and set it right. Don't just crank it to infinity and leave it.
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#4 Spirithawk

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 01:47 PM

Always sight in at the highest power setting and if there is some error it will be minimized at the lower settings.

Parallax adjustment can really help. Actually try and set it right. Don't just crank it to infinity and leave it.



That's what I kinda thought but wasn't sure. Thanks. :D

#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 04:21 PM

I actually never knew that you should zero a variable at its highest setting. I always have done just that but guess I was doing it right anyhow. I remember all the problems that scopes had many years ago and the very few problems a new scope has now. I agree also with Leo on adjusting the parralax to the distance shooting. If there is enough time it can be used as a rough distance calculator as you adjust the objective to the clearest sight picture and can glance at the setting to get a rough distance estimate.
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#6 gray wolf

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:30 AM

Any decent scope should hold zero at different power settings--I have never read instructions on a scope that said different. A good idea to check it.
I had a pretty good scope one time and I found the adjustments on the A/O to be close but not that close. Depending on your range and scope quality it is impossible to adjust the focus and parallax ( A/O adjustment ) and get everything clear --adjust for parallax and clear up the reticle best you can.
a good way to test your scope for parallax is to have your rifle sand bagged and look through the scope. Get it on your target and slowly move your head while having a full field view through the scope. If your cross hairs wander off the target you have parallax.
Many times this can be overcome to the point of making your optics usable by maintaining that full scope view--= No tunnel vision--Like you start to see when you move your head back away from the eye piece.

GW.





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