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#1 tdl12321

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 12:29 PM

I've been doing my best to get in shape, just wondered if any of the other flatlanders have started exercising for Elkatraz. If so, what are you doing to get ready?

#2 REDGREEN

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 02:45 PM

Me, I'm having another buttertart. Gotta keep my strength up! :lol:

Edited by REDGREEN, 10 May 2006 - 02:46 PM.


#3 Eric

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 07:55 PM

Well I will add my .02 cents here. PA RR and I have been walking on our ridges and little hills we call mountains here in PA. Right now is our turkey season so we sure are getting some sole wearage right now. :lol:. After turkey season I will continue to make the treck up and down the hills and ride my bike till we hit E3.
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#4 bonecollector34

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 09:32 PM

I will add you still have time, but starting sooner will assist you into easing yourself into better shape.

Endurance wise just add alittle at a time:
Like walking 4 laps around the high school track and 2 days later walking a shorter distance but add slope ie: PA hills

Slowly increase your volume week by week. Work on getting your heart in better shape, so if you can't talk clearly you are anerobic not areobic. Try and stay aerobic. That may mean walking alittle slower on the hills at first.

Strength wise: Your lower back shoulders, traps and legs will take the brunt. Starting with an empty pack on your walks and slowly adding weight to it would be an actual simulation to what you will be doing. As you get into better shape add picking your feet up higher and this will add more stress to your hip flexors and incoperate your lower abs and back to fire. That will simulate walking up and down hills and walking over fallen timber.

Also walk backwards on a track will get little muscles into shape quickly.

Fatty ;)


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#5 RicF

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 01:03 PM

Better yet, take a horse to E3..........
PATIENCE - Kills Turkeys !!

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#6 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 02:53 PM

bonecollector34 how much weight would you recommend?

Strength wise: Your lower back shoulders, traps and legs will take the brunt. Starting with an empty pack on your walks and slowly adding weight to it would be an actual simulation to what you will be doing. As you get into better shape add picking your feet up higher and this will add more stress to your hip flexors and incoperate your lower abs and back to fire. That will simulate walking up and down hills and walking over fallen timber.



Marty would 20 to 50 lbs be in the target range or more? Just curious.

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#7 bonecollector34

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 03:08 PM

Mark

I would start out as light as possible, even if you are in okay shape. Due to multiple factors working togeather at once. I really wouldn't work to 50lbs till alot closer to go time, unless your level of conditioning demands it, meaning you need more and more weight to keep your heart rate at a aerobic level.

I have packed out over 1/2 of a caribou over 5 miles in crud conditions on one trip on a frame pack. I have also packed 3/4 of a boned elk at once on one pack frame 1-1/2 miles stright out of a canyon.

I never simulated these conditions while getting ready, but if your in desent shape your body will respond. Save the heavy stuff for when ya gotta do it.

But continue to push and re-evaluate your progress until E3 is upon us.

Fatty


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#8 silvertip-co

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 08:13 PM

Wifes gone for a few months, so I mow grass, do laundry, vacuum house, pull weeds, fix the roof ev weeknd, mow the back 40,


Heck I dont have time for exercise when I am home. I lost ten lbs already since i started a new job in Denver. I hope to shed ten more in next three months.
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#9 bonecollector34

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Posted 13 May 2006 - 10:10 AM

Charlie, I wish had the same problem--being too busy.

Good work my friend, keep it up..

Fatty ;)


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#10 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 14 May 2006 - 06:45 PM

Sound advice my friend.
Thanks Marty.
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#11 Ironranger

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 04:59 PM

Coming from Flatlanderville, just wanted to chime in with what helped me. I've done 5 rifle trips and one bow trip to CO. Rifle was camping about 10,800 and hunting up from there so it was something I definitely not ready for.

First year I paid the price. Although I was younger then and in better shape, I overdid it the first few hours gathering wood, scouting, and getting camp ready. Had bad headaches for the next few days and that was no fun at all. So I learned a hard lesson. Last year, I worked fairly hard at getting ready but started early and went slow. I'm not 20 anymore and overdoing it will hurt more than help. I started walking farm roads first and would put on about 2 to 3 miles a day walking a a fast pace. Did that for a month or so and then changed to a different course. Since I was shooting my bow at a range, I would combine a mountain bike course run with shooting after on the way home. I'd start out, stretch some, and then start walking. This single track course had lots of steep hills and some flat terrain. I'd walk a ways to get warmed up and then start running the hill parts. I'd run up one, walk for a cool down, and run another hill. I did this until it was time to go west. This year, I'm going to incorporate some weight in a pack as an added bonus. In my mind, it's important to walk/run as many hills as you can or able to do. There is no flat land out there so why train on it. As I stated, I used the farm roads to get my body used to walking and went from there. This year, I'm attempting to lift more weights to strengthen the muscles around my frame which will help if I need to be a pack mule for someone or myself.

About a month before leaving, I start eating one aspirin a day as I was told it helps to thin the blood out. I drink water as much as I can and I mean pound it down till it's coming out your ________ before and during the trip!! Don't stop drinking it and you'll have a much better experience. Dehydration is bad. Last year, I drove straight thru to Idaho falls which is about 45 minutes or so west of Denver. Got a hotel room and spent that first night there. The elevation around there is about 6000 to 7000 I believe so it gave me time to acclimate. Then went to camp the next morning, setup, and was scouting/hunting that evening. Just a tinge of a headache but after that evening no issues. I felt pretty good out there and was glad I put the work into it. Of course, everyone is different so acclimation time and exercise levels will vary. I reiterate what BoneCollector said, "Start Slow"!!!

Edited by Ironranger, 26 May 2006 - 05:00 PM.


#12 Eric

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 05:24 PM

:yes: :yes: Thanks Tim for your input. It will be very useful. :yes: :yes:
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#13 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 05:35 PM

Man I am so old I don't know where to start. That is not true I have been chasing the wily gobbler all month. I know we are called flatlanders but in this section of PA there isn't much "flat" land. These old mountains may not be very high but they are steep and very rocky under foot. Here is a picture Eric took of me back in Feb or Mar standing on the side of our flat land. Notice the tree beside me which is growing pretty straight up and I am attempting to do the same.
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A few years ago I hunted New Mexico at over 7000 ft and did that for 4 years running. I live at about 1400 ft elevation but had 3 days to acclimate to 5000 before going hunting. I still had to pace myself and move a bit slower as there was just not enough air at that elevation. Because of my age the coloruffians will most likely time me with a calendar. I'll train as I am able and rely on my 7mm Mag to reach out there.
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