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What poundage do you pull on your bow


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Poll: Please select poundage range (27 member(s) have cast votes)

Please select poundage range

  1. 40 (1 votes [4.17%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.17%

  2. 45 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. 50 (1 votes [4.17%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.17%

  4. 55 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. 60 (8 votes [33.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 33.33%

  6. 65 (8 votes [33.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 33.33%

  7. 70 (4 votes [16.67%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.67%

  8. 75 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  9. 80 (2 votes [8.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.33%

  10. 85 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  11. 90 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  12. 95 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  13. 100 + (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#1 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 01:02 PM

Just wondered what your poundage is on your bow setup?

It took alot of time for me to workout enough to pull the upper 60 LBS and at 70#s for this past hunt at Wilderness.

On another site there is another thread on 80 plus poundage bowhunters and there were quit a few of them that spoke up why they liked pulling that much. Some hunted very big game or very dangerous game like water buffalo, African lion or large brown bears of Alaska. But they shoot the same bow year round at much smaller game as well.

I wonder how many we have here?

I know KE you can't have enough of. On the other hand alot of the TV show celebs pull less than 65 lbs. and they take game regularly. I know 45 lbs is enough for taking whitetail size game but 80 plus ought to knock it right off its feet.
For myself I will practise at a higher poundage and reduce it for the hunting season but some don't. It's similar to practise target shooting at 40, 50, and 60 yards and only really plan on shooting with in the 30 yard range at a deer.

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 10 May 2006 - 03:36 PM.

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#2 WayneBizzle

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 02:26 PM

60 here. Mainly cause it's all the old antique will go. :D
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#3 mudduck

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 02:40 PM

Wisconsin requires a "minimum" draw weight of 30 lbs. Remember that this limit was set long before the advent of modern compounds. I use to shoot bows in excess of 80 lbs., but found that late season here meant temps could be in the minus teens or colder and that after sitting for 2 or more hours in those temps, trying to draw a bow of that poundage put way to much pressure on my aging shoulders. 65 lbs works fine for me.

#4 REDGREEN

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 02:42 PM

Used to pull it at 80 pounds. Found that I was much more accurate at 60. I wasn't any slouch at 80 either, but it was hard on the sticks. :D

#5 Larry $

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 03:13 PM

Let me put it this way:

My draw weight + Melody's draw weight = Huck's draw weight!

Edited by Larry $, 10 May 2006 - 03:15 PM.

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#6 Leo

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 03:44 PM

Before I got hurt and dislocated both shoulders I shot 92lbs. That weight is real hard on a bow even with super heavy arrows. Got tired of fixing stuff and blasting thru targets :lol:

Went to 83lbs. Much easier to deal with.

Now 70lbs is my limit and I had to really bust my tail with therapy to get back to that. Still 20 shots is about all I can do at a time. Strength isn't the issue, stamina is.

Interestingly, my current bow set at 70lbs, shoots 50fps faster and produces 10 ft-lbs more Kinetic Energy than the old 92lber. Cam profiles and powerstroke length make a BIG difference. Set up like it is now I wouldn't feel under bowed for Buffalo. 76Ft-lbs with a 465gr arrow will go thru alot of meat with the right broadhead.
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#7 runNgun

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Posted 10 May 2006 - 08:03 PM

40 pounds here. Got to start somewhere :D


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#8 McBruce

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 07:17 AM

67 lbs for me

Ive found if I crank the bow on up to 70, I need to change to a stiff spine on the arrow ( which = heavier ) and what I gain on the last 3 lbs of draw I lose to the weight of the arrow.
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#9 Leo

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 08:28 AM

67 lbs for me

Ive found if I crank the bow on up to 70, I need to change to a stiff spine on the arrow ( which = heavier ) and what I gain on the last 3 lbs of draw I lose to the weight of the arrow.

Excellent point Bruce :yes:

I've long said that poundage adjustment is the cheapest and most underutilized tuning adjustment an archer can make on a bow.

Ever wonder why these touring 3D pros almost never have their bows maxed out and shoot odd draw weights? This is why. Guys who shoot 200arrows a day can easily handle another 3lbs of draw weight. They are tuning the bow to their arrows. Not the other way around.
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#10 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 12:34 PM

Ive found if I crank the bow on up to 70, I need to change to a stiff spine on the arrow ( which = heavier ) and what I gain on the last 3 lbs of draw I lose to the weight of the arrow.


I agree with you Bruce - that I think my accuracy goes up at or around that poundage. I don't know if its me (adding bow tork with the greater weight) or the bow being maxed out or the shaft spins being pushed to their limit.

I know if I shoot three or four different manufacturer shafts at the same spot they all group differently. That is an easton shaft will group with the easton shafts and the gold tips will go with the gold tip grouping and this makes me think the spin quality changes in each manufacturers production.

Also that is true with some shaft and cut lengths. I draw a 28" arrow with 100 grain point. The Gold Tip shaft selector shows I'm in the range UP TO 80lbs with their 5575 line . Now if you're drawing back an arrow 1" longer or shorter that does change things but you still are in the 5575 shaft preference.

On Easton's selector I fall in between two size shafts or spins selections on their charts at around 67lbs. Same with Beman's charts and on carbon express I just use the heavier spin anyway. The Blackhawk vapor pros also is very wide in what shaft spin to use.

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 11 May 2006 - 01:30 PM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#11 Spirithawk

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 04:36 PM

I have to hunt with an xbow now but I use to shoot 65 lbs. It's not how much you can draw, but rather how much you can draw comfortably, and that's shooting with you're hunting gear on and on cold days too. You're a lot more accurate if your not straining to draw after a shot or two. The deer don't care if he's shot with 40lbs or 90lbs. Hit him where it counts, with a good sharp broadhead, and he'll be just as dead with one as the other. ;)

#12 ricfirefighter

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 06:41 PM

compound at 65 2nd compound at 68 long bow at 70 and to recurves at 40 :D

#13 vcross

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 05:37 AM

I was pulling 55 before my shoulder surgery - not too bad for someone my size. Probably shouldn't have gone over 50 but wanted the speed. Now I will be working my way back up...slowly........hope I am ready by Sept. Dr. won't even let me pick up the bow for another month!

#14 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 07:42 AM

Now I will be working my way back up...slowly........hope I am ready by Sept. Dr. won't even let me pick up the bow for another month!


Vcross this is something I use just sitting around while watching TV in the evening.
Here's a simple piece of exercise equipment for the bow muscles. Obviously I suggest this with your doctors blessing as an after surgery rehabilitation. ;) bowfit Rotaflex

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 12 May 2006 - 03:11 PM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#15 1Ranger49

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Posted 12 May 2006 - 09:13 PM

In my younger days I shot a 65# recurve. Moved up to a 70# compound. Age and and the need to be a stud shooting a high poundage bow has gone by the wayside. I now shoot a 50 to 60 # bow set at the max setting around 62#. I feel more control and know that a well placed arrow in the vitals will do the job as well. Shot placement is the most important thing when shooting a bow.




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