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#1 BigE-FSU

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 11:20 AM

Im new to hunting, and its small game season right now. My buddy and I are trying to hunt squirrels, but after going out to the state forest twice we still havnt come across any game. Are we hunting in the wrong area, or are we just trying to hunt them the wrong way? Ive read alot of info on trying to stalk the squirrels and using two people to get them to keep from hiding on the opposite side of a tree, but we still havn't seen any out there. What should we do to find some game? And also, are there any other critters we should be hunting for ie. raccoons, opossums?

#2 Leo

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 05:10 PM

Public land squirrels can be pretty challenging. They are good at hiding but not good at keeping their mouths shut. Stop and listen a lot for them "barking". Go to that area, sit down be still and wait about 30 minutes.
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#3 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 03 December 2008 - 06:22 PM

Yep Leo is right on. After you sit down keep the eyes up. Sometimes a squirrel will bolt for parts unknown a few minutes after you sit down. You also need to find their food. Here in the ridge and valley part of PA we find the most squirrels in woods near corn fields. They are very commonly found around nut trees in the fall. Around here I also look on top of stumps for cuttings that is a sure sign too.
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#4 Spirithawk

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 10:12 AM

Look for good crops of acorns, Hickory Nuts, or whatever is the main food source in your area. In the spring Mulberry trees are awesome. Squirrels love them and they are the first trees to produce a crop. (The reason you're not seeing squirrels could be because they are seeing you first. They have very good eyesight and, like many wild animals, spot movement very well.) Besides food sources look for good den trees. Trees , usualy dead or at least somewhat hollow, with holes in the trunks. You can tell if squirrels are using it as a den because the lip of the hole will be shiny and smooth from the squirrels going in and out. When you find a likely spot just sit, listen, and keep your eyes open for movement. Not just in the trees but on the ground. Squirrels, this time of year, are stocking up on nuts for the winter. They'll be running up and down trees finding them and taking them back to their dens. They'll also often be carrying leaves back to their dens to insulate against the cold and to freshen their nests or dens. That brings up another point. Look for trees with nests. Finding them lets you know squirrels are in the area. Besides listening for them barking, while sitting listen for them cutting nuts. You'll hear the chatter of their teeth cutting into the nut and, if they're up high, you'll hear the fragments raining down. A good squirrel call can be well worth having. Get one that imitates a squirrel barking. They are very easy to use and when squirrels hear another squirrel barking they will often come out to see what he's barking at. You can also take a couple small rocks, tap them together and imitate a squirrel cutting nuts. Again, other squirrels will come out, this time looking for their share. You don't need two people to get a shot at a squirrel playing hide and seek around a tree trunk. Just toss your hat or jacket around the tree and the squirrel will run to your side. Also, squirrels like to stretch out and lay flat on limbs soaking up warmth from the sun. Look for the one thing that often gives them away, their tail flicking or blowing in the wind. Now, one more tip, if you get in a good spot and shoot a squirrel, don't just jump up and run to it. Mark it in your memory and stay put. The sound of a shot often won't spook squirrels but your getting up and moving will. By staying put you'll get more shots at more squirrels. Now, as to other game that you might hunt, that depends on your local wildlife codes and what is covered by your hunting license. I hope I've given you enough info that you can get you some tasty squirrels. Let us know how you do....Norm

Edited by Spirithawk, 06 December 2008 - 10:24 AM.


#5 Joe

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Posted 06 December 2008 - 10:14 AM

When I hunt a place that I have never been before I just walk into the woods a way before light. I find a tree to sit against or lean against for at least 30min most times closer to a hour and listen and watch. After light start looking for nut trees or soft mast depending on season.
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#6 BigE-FSU

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 12:17 PM

Thanks for all the help guys! My buddy and I went out last weekend, we camped out and got out there before the sun came up. We found a good spot and just waited for awhile. Heard alot of barking and we just waited until they showed up. We got 2 in the first 15 minutes, and didnt move for about another 30min and we got two more. We ended the day with 5 squirrels total. It was a great day of hunting. Thanks again for all the tips, they really work.

#7 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 01:09 PM

Way to go Big E. Glad some of our suggestions helped you out. You may want to consider saving the hides and tails and sell them to I believe it is Mepps fishing lure company. What is your weapon of choice?. I have hunted them with shotgun and now for many years have used a .22 Long Rifle and prefer head shots. That puts a whole different light on squirrel hunting. Also a word of caution. Make sure they are dead before picking them up and putting into a game bag. A local man here years ago shot a squirrel, put it in his game bag, and when he got home he reached into the bag and the squirrel bit him right through the thumbnail. He had to go to the hospital and have it surgically removed. A bit painful experience and a very humbling one for him.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 10 December 2008 - 01:13 PM.

If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
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#8 Spirithawk

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 11:05 AM

Paul's absolutely right. Make very sure they are dead. I had one come to life just as I picked it up. didn't take me long to let go. :lol: glad the tips helped. :D

#9 Leo

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 01:03 PM

A wise old man once told me.

"Remember when you put a squirrel in your vest. They like nuts!" ;)
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#10 Spirithawk

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 05:18 PM

A wise old man once told me.

"Remember when you put a squirrel in your vest. They like nuts!" ;)


:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:




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