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Lacrosse Ice King


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#1 Jeremiah

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:02 PM

After owning the Irish Setter (a division of RedWing Boots) Snow Tracker Pac boot the past couple years, I have to say that even though they boast 1400 gram Thinsulate Ultra insulation, my feet were still getting cold in extreme temperatures (20 Degrees Fahrenheit or below) when sitting still.

Ever since having weight loss surgery, my feet and hands get very cold even indoors. (It's a possible side-effect as the body adapts that does go away with time and weight stabilization.) Factor in that I also take some prescription medications that thin my blood and you have the "perfect storm" for fridgid toes in northern climate hunting!

Out of despiration, my father and I headed to Sportsman's Warehouse after a morning hunt this past Saturday where the temperature for the day never made it above 16 Degrees Farenheit. (We both froze!) We knew from past experience that pac boots were the way to go. Nothing quite keeps you warm and dry when stomping through snow like a quality "moon boot". Several models caught our eye. To our surprise, several models were only "water resistant" - not waterproof! (The Sorel Bear comes to mind.) After some pondering and speaking to the sales rep. about my situation, she recommended the LaCrosse Ice King. "The Ice King is what we suggest for ice fishing.", she said. "It isn't the best choice for hiking, but for sitting on the ice or in a deer stand/blind all day it is the choice." My eyes lit up!

I asked to try a pair of size 13 (one size larger than I normally wear) Ice Kings and instantly noticed the size of these boots when they were unboxed. They were huge! To my surprise, they were lighter than expected, however. I slipped into the right boot and felt like my foot was surrounded by a big pillow. The 3/4" thick inner-boot liner was definitely generating some heat with just having the boot on for a few moments to check the fit. The purchase was made and I felt fairly optimistic about not having cold feet on a hunt for the first time in a long time.

Today was the test. It was 19 Degrees Farenheit this morning. I believe it got up to a balmy :rolleyes: 25 this afternoon. The new boots performed like a champ! First, they were not nearly as difficult to walk in as I had imagined. I probably only went 150 yards or so from the truck, but that was still enough to see that the boots, while not made for walking (ha ha), were still surprisingly nimble for their size and given the thickness of the liners. My feet were comfortable the entire hunt. They were at no point either too hot or cold. It just felt as though I was sitting in my livingroom. For the first time this season, I spent the entire hunt without needing to place chemical foot or hand warmers inside my boots near my toes!

I can not recommend the LaCrosse Ice King Pac Boots enough to anyone who spends time outdoors sedintary in extreme cold climates. :bigthumb:

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#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:57 PM

I actually wore out a set of sorels and several replacement liners. My only problem was the liners wicked away so much moisture from my feet that the soles of my feet would crack and actually bleed unless I slathered on the hand or in this case foot lotion before donning my socks. I have since gone with a pair of Rocky boots at 1200 grams of insulations and double socks and my feet are fine. Now my hands are another matter. I too am on a blood thinner but did not think about that being a possible part of the problem.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 08 December 2008 - 08:59 PM.

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#3 Leo

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 10:08 PM

I didn't think the uppers on those boots were waterproof. Am I mistaken?
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#4 Chrud

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 06:59 AM

Great review. My brother had a pair of these same boots and really liked them. I've had really good luck with LaCrosse boots.

#5 Jeremiah

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 08:31 AM

I didn't think the uppers on those boots were waterproof. Am I mistaken?


The overview on the LaCrosse website states...

The ozone-resistant rubber bottom and full-grain leather and 1000 Denier nylon upper provides 100% waterproof protection.


:bigthumb:

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#6 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 09:13 AM

Those look like the real deal Jeremiah.


I've got another boot to consider for cold days and it's the Muck boots. Muck Boots

Comfort range temps. on these are -20*F to 70*F.

My pair of Mucks I have are very warm and comfort. last weekend I used two pairs of boots because of sweaty boots makes for a cold hunt and letting one pair dry while I continued to hunt. My Mucks and two pairs of merino socks and I stayed warm for 4 hours in the wind at 12 to 20 F*. The other boots I had are the Danner Kestrals with a 1000 gr. of insulation and at the end of 4 hours my feet were cooling down and very sweaty. I love my Danner's for working and hiking they are a warm boot. My guess is the Mucks have better insulation in the bottom between the foot and the outer layer of the boot so you don't loose heat where you contact the boot and where it contacts the cold ground or surface. Mucks are not great to hike around in but they're okay. I'd recommend the Mucks for a cold weather boot.
And my feet get cold inside when it's 65 degree.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#7 Jeremiah

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 09:24 AM

I can't do "form fitting" taller slide on boots anymore thanks to my subtalar/ankle damage. (Can barely even get loose western boots on/off anymore. :doh2: ) I've never seen Mucks with a zipper or I'd have taken a closer look by now. :(

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#8 irinman2424

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 04:24 PM

they look like my boots but the only thing I will add is I love them and would love them even more if they had the felt packs as the sorels did to me the (for alack of better words "foam") inserts are not as warm
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#9 REDGREEN

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 05:51 PM

Way to go, Jer. Nothing ruins your day like sitting around freezing. I have a set of Rocky's that work real well for me. If it gets real cold, I also have a pair of Sorrel Glaciers that are rated to -100. You can bet that if it ever gets that cold, I am staying in. For the hands, I use a set of kangaroo mitts with a liner in them. You actually have to remove them every once in a while to let the paws cool down. THEY'RE WARM!

#10 Jeremiah

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 06:18 PM

Way to go, Jer. Nothing ruins your day like sitting around freezing. I have a set of Rocky's that work real well for me. If it gets real cold, I also have a pair of Sorrel Glaciers that are rated to -100. You can bet that if it ever gets that cold, I am staying in. For the hands, I use a set of kangaroo mitts with a liner in them. You actually have to remove them every once in a while to let the paws cool down. THEY'RE WARM!


The Ice Kings are rated to -160, so I think I'm good. :D
(Anyone know how they test these numbers though? I think
the coldest temperature ever recorded was -129 F in Antarctica.)

But, what of these Kangaroo mitts? Where does one acquire such a thing? Link??

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#11 irinman2424

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 06:21 PM

I got some cheapies at wally world and use a had warmer in it (the disposable type) the mit was like 15 dollars but I think he is talking something differant
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#12 Leo

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 01:12 PM

Sorry Jere, maybe they've gotten better, but my experience with the denier nylon is that the "waterproofing" doesn't last.

I've got a pair of Lacrosse's that are almost 20 years old. They are denier uppers but the waterproofing on them failed a long time ago. Other than that. They really are good tough boots but I don't expect the uppers to keep water out anymore.
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#13 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 08:13 PM

Jere I would suggest you go to Australia and keep grabbing kangaroos and look in their pouch till you find a pair of mitts. :blink: I actually have a pair of mitts that I bought at Gander mt. They are insulated mitts that the mitt folds back and all your fingertips are then exposed. The ones I bought have 100 grams of thinsulate in them and do a good job at keeping the hands warm. The other day it was really cold and I put on a pair of those cheapy brown jersey knit gloves and then put the mitts on and my hands and fingers stayed toasty till I got back to the truck. The mitt part is not held open with velcro either. There are magnets sewn into the glove this = no noise. Whoever invented velcro was not a hunter.
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Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#14 Jeremiah

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 08:39 PM

I bought a pair of these G.I. Trigger Finger Mittens and since I wasn't convinced the liner would be warm enough I ordered a pair of these WW2 Wool Knit Trigger Finger Mittens that the website recommended for use as liners in the first ones.

We'll see how that goes! My hands are the last issue for me. I hope these do the job. (I've been using Wool/Thinsulate glomitts AND a Thinsulate hand muff with Hot Hands in them and still getting cold. So, I'm really hoping here.)

Y'all just don't understand how cold I'm getting. I'm sitting here in the livingroom typing this on my notebook and my fingers are so cold I can freeze myself out just touching my face to scratch or ponder. It's nuts. The boots haven't needed foot/hand warmers in them yet and I've hunted in them a few times now. Definitely the warmest I've ever owned. Maybe the military mittens will be a good match.

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#15 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 08:59 PM

Jere I have several pair of the military shooting mitts made of wool. I have worn them under a pair of commercial shooting mitts, the kind that the thumb and trigger finger are separate. That combo worked well to keep the hands warm but were just too bulky to shoot with as you cannot feel the trigger with your finger. I have used a pair of thin gloves under the wool mitts and that worked pretty well. I will agree that my hands and feet are my trouble to keep warm as most of my hunting is sitting on location. My youngest son got me for Christmas one year a simple tube of soft cloth that you just slip over your head and it surrounds your neck. It is long enough to pull up over the lower face and ears too. I have never seen another like it but will buy a couple more as you can turn your head and still see. I found also that when I keep my head warm the rest of me is warmer too. I wear a baseball type insulated hat with a orange pullover on top of that. A lot of the older hunters I started hunting with to a man said if you get cold cover more of your head. There has to be some truth to that. You can get creative with a scarf too.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 13 December 2008 - 09:01 PM.

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