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Whats Your Arrow And Vane Preference?


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#16 Chrud

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 06:57 AM

Here Ya go Chrud.. They screw into the back of Your Insert..insert weights


Thanks guy.

Yeah, I was Talkin about a couple years ago :o)


Well, you'll have that. :D :stir:

#17 Whip

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 07:27 AM

300 grain Xweave pro's with blazer vanes is what I shoot....mainly because it is what PSE gives me. I shoot 70 lbs and I think if you go any higher than that you will have a shaft that is way too heavily spined. IMO, the only reason to shoot a 400 grain shaft is if you are hunting dangerous game with an 80lb bow. They are just too stiff. If you are dead set on it though, Xweave black mambas are meant for just that and are 400 grain shafts.

Edited by Whip, 22 January 2009 - 07:33 AM.

Sean Whipple
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It's not a passion, it's an obsession. ~Mossy Oak

#18 Leo

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 12:09 PM

300 grain Xweave pro's with blazer vanes is what I shoot....mainly because it is what PSE gives me. I shoot 70 lbs and I think if you go any higher than that you will have a shaft that is way too heavily spined. IMO, the only reason to shoot a 400 grain shaft is if you are hunting dangerous game with an 80lb bow. They are just too stiff. If you are dead set on it though, Xweave black mambas are meant for just that and are 400 grain shafts.


I think you're confusing spine rating with grain weight.

I shoot the PSE X-Weave 300s too. The 300 designation is the spine designation not the weight. 300 spines are 8.8 grains per inch of shaft. That plus your head, insert, nock, fletching and wrap is needed for total arrow weight. Best advice is to actually weigh them instead of trying to estimate weight. My arrows total weight is 465 grains. If I went to the 400 spine arrows which are 9.2 grains per inch I'd only pick up another 8 - 9 grains of arrow weight with the same fletching, inserts, nocks and wraps. The big difference is the 400s are 33% stiffer.

Keep in mind that going across brands just because a 300spine of brand x shot well out of your setup doesn't mean a 300spine of brand y will shoot the same.

For me the X-Weaves are a good example. I actually have to go to 350 spine with carbon express arrows to get the same performance.

The reason for this difference is spine numbers only take into account the geometry of the shaft not it's material make up. Especially on carbon composite shafts there can be some very big differences.
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#19 Whip

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 11:57 PM

You are correct Leo, I did not mean to infer weight....only spine. Reading my post again it was confusing. Again, IMO, 300's are all anyone will ever need shooting under 70lbs at North American game. The only reason I shoot the Xweave Pros is because of the straightness.....I am kind of obsessive compulsive about spine, weight, and straightness.
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