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#1 Honky Cat

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 06:45 PM

Alright, I wasn't going to be a burden with questions but I have to find a solution to this problem. I bought an inexpensive but nice PSA recurve with 12 carbon arrows, a stubby little doinker, flipper rest, and a goofy little leather thing to put over my fingers. I went out by a pond near my house and spent several hours trying to sight it in (it came with fiber optic sights). I adjusted the sights as far as possible and was consistently hitting high and to the left. I took it back to the store. The guy working there was a champion archer and they had an indoor range, so I asked him to offer his opinion. I started at 20 yards. Bulls-eye. I looked at him in shock and stated that it wasn't windy outside so it must have been a flook. I tried again, near bulls eye. Then I remembered the leather finger thingy. I put it back on and watched my arrow swim its way high and to the left of my point of aim. He told me he shot with his bare fingers sometimes and found it to be good if you had good release. My fingers are well trained for trigger control, I guess that made me a natural to string release. He backed me up to 40 yards. I compensated for the bad sight adjustment and hit on the horizontal target line about 6 inches from center.

I walked out of there feeling like Robin Hood or something. After the adrenaline wore off though I noticed that I had ripped some skin out of my fingers just in a few shots. Now I don't have girly soft hands or anything, But I just cannot handle more that 4 or 5 shots before the pain becomes distracting while aiming. After 5 shots I would send a flier past my target and have to call it a day.

I revisited the leather thingy mentioned before. I tried to trim off all the excess material not needed to just protect where the string rested on my finger tips. It wasn't as bad as before but still screwed up the flight of the arrow, which for me was unacceptable.

I also tried a mechanical release (my wifes release :rolleyes: ) Lets just say I don't like it and don't want to use one.

If anyone out there has a helpful tip I would appreciate the insight.
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#2 Jeremiah

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 07:25 PM

Well, if you shoot often enough you will build up the calluses needed on your fingers to shoot that way just fine.

If you don't think you're going to shoot that often (and most simply can't/don't) then I recommend a quality tab. Without even seeing the one that came with the bow (but remembering back to my days in bow sales) the one you have isn't of high quality.

A few names to look for... Cavalier, Angel, Cartel or Soma. (Far from an exhaustive list, but a few good names.)
Cordovan is probably the "best" face material for a tab (Hair type being probably second and what I've always used.)

I don't know how you shoot, but I shoot three fingers under the arrow with a traditional bow. Most do not, they shoot index finger above and then two under the arrow. If this is your style then make sure that whatever tab you choose has a good finger spacer in the correct width for your arrow and fingers. (Some quality tabs have interchangeable finger spacers.)

Someone will undoubtedly mention a three finger archer's glove in this conversation and that's fine. However, most archers, myself included, have found tabs to be provide a cleaner release which lends to accuracy. (But, that's a call each person must make for themselves.)

One final note: The bowstring should rest closer to the tips of your fingers than the knuckles. (I like to be right in the middle of the pad between fingertip and first knuckle.) Unfortunately, a lot of people lose the feel for this when using any shooting aid (glove, tab, whatever) and end up moving the string closer to their first knuckles, if not directly into the crease of their knuckles, without realizing it. This will cause the string to roll off of the fingers/glove/tab instead of sliding cleanly off. This is usually what accounts for the change in accuracy from one shooting aid to another. (Bare fingers or a glove will actually further magnify this effect. Quality tabs promote the string sliding off cleanly on release with as little rolling as possible, but even they can only do so much for you.)

Hopefully I've given you a few things to ponder/consider. Keep at it and have fun. :)

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#3 ricfirefighter

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:07 PM

my first thought is take them sights off and throw them away :evilgrin: if you are going to shoot a recurve shoot it traditional no sights. i love shooting both my recurve and my long bow, both with wood arrows i do use the glove though never liked the tab. most important thing is to have fun.

#4 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 10:13 PM

How long is your bow. When I shot a recurve I shot bows from 60 to 72 inches long. If you are shooting a short bow you can hardly keep from pinching the arrow at full draw. The small triangle made from the bow tips and your fingers on a short bow is a tight pinch. Without a tab with a spacer you will pinch the arrow as you have very little finger strength to keep your fingers separated. Also a short recurve is a very tempremental animal and accentuates any small errors in shooting form. Without seeing you actually shoot it may be hard to determine why you shoot so much better without finger protection. You may not be keeping your fingers at a 90 degree angle to the string with the finger protection on. Also use a wrist sling and a light grip on the bow and do not grab the bow as that will destroy accuracy.
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#5 Spirithawk

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:28 AM

I always used a glove, even with compounds. Never could get use to a release. Those finger tabs are useless as far as I'm concerned. Go with a glove or bare fingers.

#6 Honky Cat

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 11:51 AM

I think PA Ridge Runner probably hit the nail on the head with the short bow problem. My bow is not marked with a length but I would guess it to be 60" with the string on ( I'm guessing also that you measure the length that way not at rest). I shoot with index finger on top and index my thumb on my on my jaw under my ear. Its nice to hear that there are some better options out there and if I can afford it I'll try some. I really want to start bow hunting but I just can't take a chance with a weapon I don't feel 99.99% effective with.

The limbs of this bow are removable, could I repalce them with longer ones and save a few $?
Don't pray for a light load. Pray for a strong back.

#7 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 01:23 PM

I think PA Ridge Runner probably hit the nail on the head with the short bow problem. My bow is not marked with a length but I would guess it to be 60" with the string on ( I'm guessing also that you measure the length that way not at rest). I shoot with index finger on top and index my thumb on my on my jaw under my ear. Its nice to hear that there are some better options out there and if I can afford it I'll try some. I really want to start bow hunting but I just can't take a chance with a weapon I don't feel 99.99% effective with.

The limbs of this bow are removable, could I repalce them with longer ones and save a few $?



I'm new to traditional style archery too. I cannot feel comfortable using bear fingers on the string. I have to have a glove. I have to say wearing some leather gloves makes for a longer and easier shooting practices. There are several different styles of gloves out there to choose from and then there are tabs that look like an open mittens that works for some too. You might try shooting with three fingers under with a glove on and see if that doesn't get you back down in the bullseye.

I bought an inexpensive but nice PSA recurve with 12 carbon arrows, a stubby little doinker, flipper rest, and a goofy little leather thing to put over my fingers.



I looked for them on the web and nothing was related popped up. I wonder if you have a PSE bow? So removing the limbs you might double check the manufacturer of the bow for other take down limbs for it. PSE is a very popular archery company. The other thing is the brace height measurement from the rest to the string should be around 7" if not a bit more. You can adjust it sometimes by twisting or un-twisting the bow string. I hope that helps out.

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 09 February 2009 - 02:02 PM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 03:13 PM

A 60 inch bow isn't real bad for pinch but could still be your problem. If you are using a glove to shoot with here is something you might try. Cut a block of wood about the width of your finger and 1/2 to 3/4 inch long. The thickness should be as thick as the nock is wide or a tad wider. Tape that block to either of your fingers next to the arrow. This will give you a temporary block to try and see if finger pinch is causing your accuracy problem. When I shot with a glove I taped a block to the finger stall to hunt with and used a Kant pinch tab in competition. I tried the three finger under in both hunting and competition but had to change my whole set up to do that and it never felt comfortable. Shooting three fingers under changes your nocking point drastically or if you use the same nocking point it changes just about everything else on the bow especially your sighting set up. When I shot recurve I used a kisser button and a string peep and even a level on both my hunting and competition bows.
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#9 Honky Cat

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 02:36 PM

I'll have to try some of the stuff you guys recommended and get back later on the results.

By the way I was wrong, It is a PSE not PSA Impala 60" 40 or 45 lb draw.
Don't pray for a light load. Pray for a strong back.

#10 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 04:05 PM

I'll have to try some of the stuff you guys recommended and get back later on the results.

By the way I was wrong, It is a PSE not PSA Impala 60" 40 or 45 lb draw.



That's the fun part, getting to try different things out and learning how it works, having fun is the most important part of it! :D
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#11 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 05:35 PM

My post refered to nocking point will change but I really meant anchoring point. Sorry bout that.
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#12 Honky Cat

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 03:09 PM

I got to shoot my bow today. I did everything as before just to get a good control group.

Results are: Don't think I will change a thing.

Sorry to get all that great advise and then not try it. Here's why

I think my first season of burning wood for heat has done wonders to my fingers (in bow terms)

I don't wear gloves most of the time when carrying or manually splitting. Also, last practice

session was on a bitter cold day that probably was harder on my bare fingers. Today was very

warm around here so that wasn't an issue. I made 6 shots at about 27 yards. 27 yards is the

distance from the back of my garage to a line of brush in case you wonder why I would use an

odd-ball distance like that. I shot an approximate 6 inch group centered around the center of

the target which I was aiming at (no compensating). Most were 2"-3" left and zeroed vertically.

I used the same arrow to make sure any variance was on my part.

I was so pleased with the results that I will now move on to other deficiencies like shooting a

bow from a tree stand or dealing with wind. I think I could easily take a deer now if conditions

ideal and I keep my hands warm until making a shot. Got until Feb 22 around here to find out.

I would now like to ask about broadhead choices for a light draw recurve like mine but I'm afraid

that might open a can of worms. I bought some 100 grain triple blades because they were cheap
and sharp enough to make a hole. That should be good enough, right?
Don't pray for a light load. Pray for a strong back.

#13 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 03:42 PM

I got to shoot my bow today. I did everything as before just to get a good control group.

Got until Feb 22 around here to find out.

I would now like to ask about broadhead choices for a light draw recurve like mine but I'm afraid

that might open a can of worms. I bought some 100 grain triple blades because they were cheap
and sharp enough to make a hole. That should be good enough, right?

Glad things changed for you for the better and traditional style shooters would be very happt with a 27 yard kill. My guess you'll be shooting a bit closer.

Ohio DNR I think I might suggest to you you might check the regs for Ohio on the dates you can hunt and kill deer in Ohio. The season closed on the first of February. The regs should be out later this month and there are some proposal to change them for this coming deer season. :hmm: :hmm: :peace:
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#14 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 09:02 PM

Glad to hear that you are working out your problems. Remember all of our replies are suggestions and just that. A 100 gr broadhead should work fine. I started out shooting in the mid 1950s and broadheads were not like those of today. For many years I shot 125 gr Wasp and Satelite broadheads with good results. Just be sure to practice with a broadhead because it most likely will not hit point of aim of a field point.
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#15 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 04:41 PM

jr,
I have shot bows for almost 40 years, recurves, longbows and compounds, and still shoot fingers. I have never shot a release.

I continue to shoot with my bare fingers to this day and do not use a glove or a tab. I tab is noted to have the greater accuracy as opposed to a glove however. I just never liked the awkwardness of either, and personally like to be able to feel the string as much as possible.

What I do use, are called "NO-GLUV Nocks". Different companies may have different model names for them. I'm not sure if they're still available (I think they are), as I bought a few of them years ago and haven't had to buy new ones in a while. They are rubber sleeves that slide on over your string. One above the knock and one longer one below. You still grab the string with your bare fingers, but the string is fatter now where you grab it, and certainly much softer with the rubber material covering it.

Recurve target archers do not like these as they make the string fatter and you must move your fingers further out of the way to accomplish a release. What you have to get used to doing, is like Jer said, hold the string out closer to the ends of your fingers, not back on the inner joints of your fingers. I have gotten so I can hold the string on the very ends of my finger tips allowing me for a smoother release.

You also have to remember NOT to make a conscious effort to "let go" of the string, which causes "plucking" and creates "fish tailing" and hits to one side or the other. A release is supposed to be accomplished by relaxing your fingers, and allowing the string to slip away from your hand, and not making your hands/fingers move away from the string.

I may not be the most accurate archer in my area, but I am one archer who enjoys what he does when he has a bow in his hand. And after all, that's what it's all about! Right?

Good luck!

Geoff / TBow

Edited by Geoff / TBow, 06 April 2011 - 09:23 PM.

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