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Inshore Fishing Question


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#1 Whitetiger

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 02:34 PM

Does anyone here go fishing for flounder ? I want to get a group of coworkers out on a charter. But I cant use a baitcaster to save my life. The only time Ive gone saltwater was as a kid and I bird nested every 10 minutes. I tried as an adult to use a baitcaster but gave up. I prefer spinning gear. I was wondering what pound test line would be good for inshore for flounder. I have a good uglystick I use for cats, pike & stripers. What pound test should I use if the captain doesnt have spinning gear?

#2 Leo

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Posted 06 March 2009 - 03:18 PM

I use 30lb Power Pro for all my inshore fishing. It's equivalent to 8lb mono in diameter and that size works the best casting on medium sized spinning gear.

Sure 30lb line is overkill for flounder but if you hook a monster blue, striper or drum incidentally while fishing for flounder at least you have a chance landing him. Down here we are also likely to hook a cobia, tarpon or a big blacktip shark. Being prepared for those incidental hook ups is the difference between heartbreak and success.

Spooling up with a slick braid like Powerpro you ABSOLUTELY MUST tape down the starter knot on the spool and wind over the tape. This stuff is so slick if you don't the whole load of line will just spin on the spool and the drag won't work. Because it's so slick Powerpro won't cut your rod guides like 14lb mono will on a long run. It's actually much easier on your rod guides.

You also have to use a Palomar knot instead of a clinch knot. Clinch Knots will not hold on super braids!

Get a small pair of Fiskars fishing scissors. Standard line clippers will end up looking like a hockey players smile in no time. Super Braids destroy clippers! The small scissors are the best way to go with this stuff.

You'll cast farther easier. Feel more bites and will be able to set the hook with significantly less effort. I've used it a lot the past six years and I am very satisfied with it.

It's absolutely worth making the change and getting used to.

Set your drag like it's 14lb line and go have fun! ;)
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#3 Coalman

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 07:07 AM

You don't have to cast while flounder fishing. You bump the bottom straight down. A baitcaster is reel of choice.
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#4 Leo

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Posted 08 March 2009 - 08:46 AM

You don't have to cast while flounder fishing. You bump the bottom straight down. A baitcaster is reel of choice.


Not always true. We find them in 1 to 4 ft of water here frequently. Casting to those is preferred and most productive.

If you find them in deeper water on a big sandbar flat out in the bay then yes bottom bumping is the way to go.

Brings up a good question. What is the captain going to expect Whitetiger to do? Cast or bottom bump?
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#5 Whitetiger

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 07:32 AM

The only time I went was on a party boat & were bottom bouncing. I still birdnested alot. Im just more comfortable with spinning gear then baitcasters.

#6 Leo

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Posted 09 March 2009 - 12:53 PM

If you're backlashing while bottom bouncing you're probably letting the weight hit the bottom too fast when in free spool.

Just put your thumb on the spool and keep it there before you ever touch the free spool lever. Apply pressure with your thumb to control the speed of the line going out. In fact don't take your thumb off the spool until the reel is in gear, and you'll do fine. Too slow is absolutely easier to deal with than backlashs. You'll get a feel for how fast you can let it drop after practice.
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#7 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 09:51 AM

Whitetiger these two have give you some great advice. My impression of party boat charter trips are a few on Lake Erie and one or two off the Emerald Isle in the Atlantic. The rods and reels are not the best equipment and will present some trouble for the fisherman who hasn't used it very often. I know several guys who fish alot that hate bait casters because the can't get the hang of the thumb on the reel almost all the time. I keep mine on almost all the time and even keep it on while fighting some larger fish to help controling the drag. Some baitcasters are harder than others to use but the key is knowing how to setup the reel or brake on the reel so the fall of the line/bait is very slow once you let go of the reel with your thumb. A fast drop is where you get in trouble. Once the terminal end/bait hits the water or bottom the reel continues to roll and un load line if not setup properly with the proper set up it won't do that as bad and won't bird nest on you nearly as much. Most commercial equipment is tough to adjust in my humble opinion.
My advice is spool up with what Leo told about, it's great stuff and use your own equipment if it can handle fishing in those conditions. And have a blast!!!!!!
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."




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