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Knight Lk-93 Stainless Steel .50 Caliber


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#1 cayugad

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 09:02 PM

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earlier this month I had a chance to purchase a Knight Wolverine LK-93 stainless steel barrel .50 caliber for next to nothing. It was missing a front site, so I threw a 1x32mm scope on it.

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the scope sighted in pretty fast. I was very pleased with how well this rifle shot.

I then moved the target back to 50 yards and did some more shooting.

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this small chunk of 2x4 was put at 50 yards and I wanted to make sure I could hit something with it. I shot a lot of small chunks of wood. I even got lazy and stacked them then would shoot the piece off the top so I did not have to walk in too often to the target.

As anyone that ever owned one of the simple Knight rifles.. 22 inch barrel, nothing fancy, but normally deadly accurate. I'd hunt a deer any day with that rifle and that load. (80 grains of 2f black powder and a 300 grain .44 caliber Hornady XTP).
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, a total wreck with a big smile on your face."

#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 10:10 AM

I have to agree. Like my Bighorn the LK-93 harkens to a simpler less complicated time. Looks like your 93 is very accurate congratulations.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#3 bear hunter

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 06:50 AM

I also purchased a Knight LK93 but have no Idea where to start everyone that I talk to tells me a differant way to load and clean it. I call Knight but they never returned my call.
But I need to know how to load it and what I need and how and when to clean it. I have some things but on powder some say buy the can others tell me I can put the pills or what ever they call them but then another told me I can not use them with the LK93.
I just need some help if someone could tell me who to contact.

Edited by bear hunter, 07 May 2009 - 06:51 AM.


#4 cayugad

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 11:00 PM

I also purchased a Knight LK93 but have no Idea where to start everyone that I talk to tells me a differant way to load and clean it. I call Knight but they never returned my call.
But I need to know how to load it and what I need and how and when to clean it. I have some things but on powder some say buy the can others tell me I can put the pills or what ever they call them but then another told me I can not use them with the LK93.
I just need some help if someone could tell me who to contact.


First off the type of ignition will dictate the kind of powder to use. If you rifle shoots a 209 primer for instance, then you can shoot pellets, or any kind of loose powder you like. Although because of the open breech, stay away from BlackHorn 209. But if your rifle, like mine, uses a #11 cap nipple system, then you are forced to stick to loose powder. I would recommend Pyrodex RS or black powder.

Next the length of the barrel will help you determine the powder charge. You know the rifle has a 1-28 twist. Because of this, the rifle was made to shoot sabots or conicals. If the barrel is 22 inches long, then you have to remember that with every ignition of powder, because of barrel length, there comes a point of diminished returns for the amount of powder you shoot. Normally in a 22 inch barrel I consider anything over 110 grains of powder, a waste of powder. You just do not have the length to effectively burn more powder out of that short of a barrel. If you try it will not increase the velocity of the projectile. That is diminished returns on the powder charge. Also you will waste powder as it will flash burn out in front of the rifle. If your rifle has a longer barrel (and I doubt it does if it is a LK series) then you can increase that powder charge, but there really is no need.

Cleaning a Knight rifle is easy. With the LK rifles, the back hammer striker unscrews from the back of the barrel as one unit. You do not take this apart. Where the gnarled part of the bolt sits to the back of the rifle, turn that counter clock wise. Sometimes you need to rest your thumb on the actually hammer to keep it from turning with the locking nut part of the hammer striker. Once you get the hammer assembly unscrewed, pull back on the trigger and then pull the hammer striker. It will release it. Also remember when you reassemble the rifle, pull back on the trigger to push it back, into the breech of the rifle.

With the bolt * (they call the hammer striker assembly a bolt very often) out of the rifle, there is a Allen head screw on the bottom of the rifle. This should be removed. Pull the ramrod from the rifle stock and the stock should come off the rifle. This same size Allen wrench will also remove the trigger assembly. Its a good idea to take that trigger off, and from time to time take some brake cleaner and go outside and spray the internal parts of the trigger free of fouling. Shake it good and hard. And set it to the side to dry.

Now with the trigger assembly off, Knight sells a breech plug wrench. One end removes the nipple. The other end removes the breech plug. So you remove the nipple first of course and wipe that clean of all fouling. Then you remove the breech plug. Pay attention to the threads of the breech plug. Clean and inspect them. After the rifle is cleaned and before you put that back in the rifle, be sure to apply some Teflon tape to the threads, or anti seize grease. Also when you put the plug back into the rifle, when it is tight to the barrel, turn it off 1/4 turn because it will help in getting it back out the next time you shoot.

When cleaning the barrel, clean from the breech to the muzzle if you have a nice long ramrod. Pay special attention to the threads inside the rifle and make sure they are nice and clean. Also after you have the barrel nice and clean, run a patch with a quality gun oil on it, through the barrel. This will protect the bore.

Clean all the rifle parts and then assemble the rifle opposite of the way you took it apart. Any questions you have on that rifle feel free to contact me in a PM, email or on the forum. I am more then glad to help you solve your problems.

A good starting load for your rifle is 80 grains of powder and a 240 grain XTP in a harvester crushed rib sabot. Also the 250 grain shockwaves shoot well out of the rifle. As do the 300 grain Hornady XTP. 80 grains is all the powder you need for a deer. It will know a deer flat.

http://images.ebsco....omplete_web.pdf there is a link to a on line manual for your rifle. Down load it and print it out if you want. It is a PDF file.
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, a total wreck with a big smile on your face."

#5 McBruce

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 02:52 PM

great post
tons of info there :)
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#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 02:52 PM

Bear, Cayugad gave you great info. I have a Knight Bighorn which is essentially the same as your model. As for load he is also right on. I use 80 gr of 2f black powder and a 300 gr Hornady XTP in a harvester crush rib sabot. I have shot 5 or 6 deer with mine and am very pleased with the rifles accuracy and with the killing power of the Hornady XTP. You must clean your rifle after each shooting session.

When I take my rifle to the range I begin by taking an alcohol wet patch down the barrel to remove the oil followed by two dry patches. I then pour 80 grains of loose powder down the barrel and bump the rifle lightly with the heel of my hand to settle the powder. I then insert a bullet into the sabot and push it down to the powder. Be sure that the bullet/sabot is all the way down because if it is not, the bullet becomes a barrel obstruction. Eash time after I shoot I take an alcohol patch and two dry ones down the barrel and reload. My rifle likes this method but does not like a dirty bore although I can get three shots without cleaning and still have good accuracy. I get my best accuracy from a clean bore though. I even take a few wet alcohol patches with me when hunting and if time permits I clean the bore before I reload in the field.

I personally am using real black powder so I first dismantle my rifle as cayugad stated so I only have the barrel in hand. I use hot soapy water and scrub the bore clean. I then use very hot water to rinse the bore. I run a patch through and let it sit while I clean the striker, nipple, and breech plug in hot soapy water and rinse. I then proceed to use a modern day powder solvent on the barrel and the parts. I clean until a solvent patch followed by a clean dry patch comes out clean. I then oil the barrel, apply anti sieze to both the breech plug threads and the nipple threads and put it all back together and store till I play next time.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




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