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#1 mudduck

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 08:25 AM

Sanctuary Nurtures Wolves, Promotes Education
SILVER CLIFF, Colo. (CBS) ― Posted Image Click to enlarge 1 of 1One of the residents at the Mission Wolf Sanctuary in Silver Cliff. CBS


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[url="""][/url]numSlides of totalImages [url="""][/url] <H3 class=cbstv_section_head>Related Links</H3>It was very near a remote Colorado Valley near Silver Cliff that one of the last free-roaming wolves in Colorado was killed in the late 1940s. Seven decades later the only wolves to be seen or heard in these parts live behind a chain link fence.

Kent Weber is dedicated to the return of the wolf to the Colorado Wild.

"Many people are afraid of wolves today," said Weber. "And we find that when they meet a wolf, they learn a little connection with nature."

Raven is one of the wolves that lives at Mission Wolf, a sanctuary in Silver Cliff. She's a 6-year-old Canadian gray wolf that came off a movie project.

"She was born in captivity and doesn't have a clue how to survive in the wild," Weber said.

In the 1980s Weber and his wife Tracy began creating Mission Wolf. Now they have about 200 acres protected for the wolves. More than 30 acres is fenced for the wolves to live. The Webers' main strategy is education, reports CBS station KCNC-TV in Denver.

Rami is an ambassador wolf who has traveled a lot, appearing on national television broadcasts and with thousands of school children around the country.

"We say of all the wolves in the country, she's probably done more to help wild wolves return than any other wolf we've ever known," says Weber.

Obidiah is another resident wolf. He has arthritis in his hips. He's one of two 15-year-old wolves at the sanctuary.

"That's almost unheard of," explained Weber. "Most wolves live in the wild to be six years. If you're lucky enough to live in Yellowstone as a wolf, nobody can hunt you, you've got a lot of food to eat; they're living eight years. But unfortunately people who keep a wolf in captivity, the animals end up dead in two years because people can't provide."

Mission Wolf is located at the end of a 14-mile drive on a dirt road, part of which winds through the San Isabel National Forest.

"So if you can find this place you can bring your family out and we'll give you a tour and then if you go 'what can I do to help,' we'll put you to work," Weber said.

Interns from around the country and around the world come to Mission Wolf to volunteer their time for the chance to learn. Amy Sidderly came from Manchester, England. She'll stay here for a year.

"I love it. To get out of the city was great and there's not anything like this in England," said Sidderly. "Especially to live here on site, Mission Wolf just gives you so many opportunities."

Pat Willis grew up in Iowa.

"They're just such loyal, loving individual creatures, you know. They're just beautiful," says Willis. "I have an affinity for them because they're very misunderstood, run around, persecuted, and I feel for them for that."

Tim Reed is here from California.

"When talking to people after they've had a chance to meet a wolf, you can really sense a change in what they thought a wolf was like," Reed says."And then you get to talk to them about breaking down the misconceptions of the wolf and learning about a true wild animal."

Kent Weber could not have imagined the progress he has seen since Mission Wolf was founded, including the re-introduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park.

"In 20 years we have watched wolves return to 12 states in the lower 48," Weber said.

Colorado's bloated elk population, Weber believes, needs the classic predator to help restore natural balance to the wild.

"It's always been said that what we do to the animals, we will eventually do to ourselves," explains Weber. "Maybe humans in the future will realize that if we take care of the grizzly bear and the wolf, on top of the food chain, we've almost completely eradicated these animals.

Maybe humans in the future will realize if we take care of the grizzly and the wolf, we will take better care of our children."

#2 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 08:50 AM

Would the population or expansion of cities in Colorado handle a introduction of wild wolves? Would all the ranches and game ranches in Colorado put up with a pack of wolves on their land? With all the hunting done there would a wolf stand a chance if it confronts a hunter? I thinks this guy is off his rocker!

I have been around captive raised wolves and even hybrids and they all are still very wild. A wolf doesn't loose it's pack inherit nature. They will play the role of a dog in our eyes to a point but in reality they are installing a packs higher Archy in your presents or family. A wolf reverts back to a wild wolf if presented with the pack of other wolves. If you aren't a part of the pack look out.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#3 mudduck

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 11:34 AM

Maybe humans in the future will realize if we take care of the grizzly and the wolf, we will take better care of our children."

Wow! Either they are on something, or onto something right therePosted Image

#4 Phil

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 03:23 PM

Posted Image ....beam me up Scotty !....What a Moron !
Posted Image

#5 Spirithawk

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 05:21 PM

I know this may seem like an odd comparison but it's not realy. Here in Brason we have numerous areas of woods scattered throuout the city. They are home to an abundent herd of deer. They are constantly being hit by cars. Constantly dying from disease and constantly being squeezed into smaller and smaller areas, thus keeping the problem on the increase. Just this week a young buck jumped off the roof of a parking garage down town Branson. The Hilton's parking garage 4 stories high. Yep it died and layed there for 4 hours before the Conservation Dept got around to getting there. A gaurd at the Hilton wanted to take it while fresh but the Police said no, had to wait for the MDC. Shame it died and a shame it went to waste. Why is nothing done to thin the deer numbers? Because mamby pamby people know better than what common sense dictates. They know better than what anyone truly familiar with the animals, and the problems, do because they watch deer in Disney movies and cartoons thus making them exsperts. This guy out in Colorado fits their class. Rather than look at reality, they see only what they want to see. They don't see the problems caused because they don't wish to and realy don't have the animal's, they clame to care so much about, best interest at heart. They live in a fantasy world and everyone else, including the animals, suffer as a result. Why don't they just tie the animals legs and toss it onto a busy freeway? Both it and people, would stand about as good a chance of no serious problem if they did, as if when they release an animal into an area not suited for it's survival.

Edited by Spirithawk, 09 June 2009 - 05:22 PM.


#6 RobertR

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 08:07 PM

This is one train wreck that has already derailed, so fight it hard Colorado. The only thing these environmental nuts have in mind is putting the hunter on the endangered species list.
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#7 Whip

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 09:33 PM

Would the population or expansion of cities in Colorado handle a introduction of wild wolves? Would all the ranches and game ranches in Colorado put up with a pack of wolves on their land? With all the hunting done there would a wolf stand a chance if it confronts a hunter? I thinks this guy is off his rocker!

I have been around captive raised wolves and even hybrids and they all are still very wild. A wolf doesn't loose it's pack inherit nature. They will play the role of a dog in our eyes to a point but in reality they are installing a packs higher Archy in your presents or family. A wolf reverts back to a wild wolf if presented with the pack of other wolves. If you aren't a part of the pack look out.


To be honest all dogs are pack animals. Given the opportunity, they will revert to a pack mentality. More livestock are killed annually by feral dogs than wolves. There are two sides to every story, and unfortunately I know both quite well from my work with the government. There is no single solution and unfortunately one side will end up unhappy. The government has a very valid point, and so do ranchers. You will never be able to explain to a wildlife biologist why wolves need to be eradicated, the same way you can't tell a rancher that wolves are valuable. Double-edged sword.
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#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 07:20 AM

All I can Say is S S S.
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#9 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 10 June 2009 - 02:51 PM

To be honest all dogs are pack animals. Given the opportunity, they will revert to a pack mentality. More livestock are killed annually by feral dogs than wolves. There are two sides to every story, and unfortunately I know both quite well from my work with the government. There is no single solution and unfortunately one side will end up unhappy. The government has a very valid point, and so do ranchers. You will never be able to explain to a wildlife biologist why wolves need to be eradicated, the same way you can't tell a rancher that wolves are valuable. Double-edged sword.



You will never be able to explain to a wildlife biologist why wolves need to be eradicated, the same way you can't tell a rancher that wolves are valuable. Double-edged sword.


Totally agree with you here Whip. My point was this guy wants Colorado ready for this reintro of the wolf and I don't live there but from what little a know of it I think he's off his rocker if he thinks this would be good for the wolf or for people.

Mudduck I think you hit the nail on the head.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#10 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 04:48 AM

Look at what's happening in Wyoming - More than five times the recovery goal and the feds still will not let the state of Wyoming manage the packs.

It ain't about wolves folks.

It's just like gun control - more about control than guns.
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26




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