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Advice - Bowhunting Pronghorn


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#1 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 06:08 AM

Looks like I'll be hunting pronghorn with the bow late August in the Shirley Basin, area 47, Wyoming; about an hour and a half nw of Laramie. I think the pronghorn rut is mid September - have to check that - so, the main plan is to sit water holes in the extremely hilly/mountainous area. Unfortunately, sometimes the weather doesn't cooperate and there could be rain.

If that were to happen, I suppose it's spot and stalk with a bow? Anyone ever been in that situation with a bow for pronghorn? What did you try?

Also, I plan to camp in the area for about 5 days, what would you take, and even more important, what would you leave home?

Appreciate any experience or advice you may have.
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#2 Spirithawk

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 09:30 AM

Since you'll be camping plenty of water would be a must, a first aid kit including a snake bite kit, plenty of extra batteries for your flashlight, rain gear, extra release for your bow, plenty of snacks for when you're hunting, extra knife, binoculars and range finder and just anything you would normaly take on an extended hunt. Try to imagine any emergencies you might could run into and then take what's needed to be prepared is how I'd do it.

#3 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 09:56 AM

If that were to happen, I suppose it's spot and stalk with a bow? Anyone ever been in that situation with a bow for pronghorn? What did you try?


It did back in 2007 when I went out to S.E. CO to hunt over a water hole with an outfitter. It rained monsoons and we did try a spot stalk and several other in the camp did as well and only one guy got an arrow in one but the shot was 80 yards. The outfitter was not using dekes then but since I have read he's doing it more often. The terrain there is very flat and open and no where to get out sight of the speed goats except for a catus bush 2 ft high, heck they'd see us no matter what we did. I suggest that you be very well practiced over 40 yards even from a blind at a water hole.

I'm going back for round two this August on the 19 and hopefully Mother Nature will cooperate by keeping it dry enough they have to use the watering holes.
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#4 Leo

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Posted 26 June 2009 - 12:02 PM

Looks like I'll be hunting pronghorn with the bow late August in the Shirley Basin, area 47, Wyoming; about an hour and a half nw of Laramie. I think the pronghorn rut is mid September - have to check that - so, the main plan is to sit water holes in the extremely hilly/mountainous area. Unfortunately, sometimes the weather doesn't cooperate and there could be rain.

If that were to happen, I suppose it's spot and stalk with a bow? Anyone ever been in that situation with a bow for pronghorn? What did you try?

Also, I plan to camp in the area for about 5 days, what would you take, and even more important, what would you leave home?

Appreciate any experience or advice you may have.


I did the waterhole thing until it started raining on me. Spot and stalk with a bow can be done. The main thing is to have a good set of binoculars. You need these to pick out animals that are big enough and accessable. There were several very big pronghorns that there simply was no way to stalk based on where they were. IE. Your chances of approaching one that's in a flat field of sage with no ditchs or hills is zero.

Use binoculars to plan the stalk and determine if it is even possible. Pass on the ones you think are dicey no matter how big the pronghorn looks. A well planned stalk takes a long time to execute don't waste time with super hard stalks or you'll run out of time.

If it's raining pretty hard some of the antelope will lay down. These are harder to spot but sometimes the easiest to stalk. Especially if they lay up in a ditch. They'll lay down with their butt pointed into the wind.
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#5 RobertR

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 06:46 AM

The antelope rut starts mid August and heats up about the second week of September. As with any ruting animal early can be better because they don't have as many does or eye's to deal with. Water holes can be productive so long as it has not rained giving them mud holes to drink from and an antelope don't much water. I prefer a decoy and spot and stalk because you can be more mobile and cover a lot of ground. On the other hand I like using my ground blind along with the decoy. I think it is wise to have an antelope call because it can convince an antelope to come in that might otherwise walk off. Remember to aim low because antelope have a fast reaction time.
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#6 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 11:53 AM

The antelope rut starts mid August and heats up about the second week of September. As with any ruting animal early can be better because they don't have as many does or eye's to deal with. Water holes can be productive so long as it has not rained giving them mud holes to drink from and an antelope don't much water. I prefer a decoy and spot and stalk because you can be more mobile and cover a lot of ground. On the other hand I like using my ground blind along with the decoy. I think it is wise to have an antelope call because it can convince an antelope to come in that might otherwise walk off. Remember to aim low because antelope have a fast reaction time.



RobertR can you recommend a good antelope call?
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#7 RobertR

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 02:46 PM

Rowdy out of the calls I have tried I like Lohmans challenge call. I have tried Elk Inc's antelope talk call but I don't like having to bite down on a call but it has a good sound. Woodswise and Primos both make good calls and out of the two I liked the Primos call sound and ease of use. Other than Elk Inc's call all the others mentioned are reed type calls. The best use of a call is pre rut through the rut but the best is if you can get between a buck and his does and challenge him. The one thing I have learned is don't call to much. Out of all the game animals I think the antelope is the least vocal and basically all you may here is a challenge call or a warning call to alert the rest of the herd.
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#8 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 10:55 AM

Thanks RobertR! Yeah I haven't heard of many folks hunting antelope even use a call before so it must be like you say very low usage. I'll be hunting before the rut so I might not even bother taking one this trip. Posted Image
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#9 Leo

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 01:41 PM

Thanks RobertR! Yeah I haven't heard of many folks hunting antelope even use a call before so it must be like you say very low usage. I'll be hunting before the rut so I might not even bother taking one this trip. Posted Image


If they aren't rutting they won't even be interested in the call. But if they are it's a great thing. The guy I went with last year had some footage calling in a pronghorn for another friend of mine. It was impressive. But they weren't interested at all when I was there. It was still too early.
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#10 bonecollector34

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 12:39 AM

bleeps as do decoys work well for archers, antelope are very aggressive this time of year and do not take another smaller buck even getting close to their does

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#11 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 04:51 AM

Boys I'm somewhat of a hunting show junkie and can't recall a single one using an antelope call - what does it sound like and what are you trying to imitate? Is the call sort of like a whitetail doe bleat? Is it an attempt to sound like a hot doe?

On Antelope decoys, should I use a decoy at water? If so, which is better doe or buck and should it be 3d or is 2d o.k.? On a spot and stalk, should I use a buck and attempt to mimic a challenge? Or should I use a doe and look like and sound like a hot doe?

Thanks!
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26




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