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A Question About Hunting Elk


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#1 Spirithawk

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 07:19 PM

Ok, say a guy has never hunted Elk before. He wants to hunt public land, on his own, no guide. A rifle or muzzleloader hunt. Any suggestions on where to go and any tips on how to go about it?

#2 Larry $

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 07:12 AM

Lot's of walking, lot's of lung capacity, very good physical condition, lot's of patience, and a good measure of luck. As for specific procedures, I leave that up to the old pro's like Huck, Bruce and now Phil.
Elk: it's what's for dinner!

#3 silvertip-co

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 07:54 AM

Walk, lose weight, ride yourt mtn bike daily, learn to drink gallons of water, read study make fone calls do research etc on the area you wanna go, maybe start with a cow tag so you dont get disappointed when you dont twang that 450" bull the first ten mins of the first day, and read this first:

http://elkhunter2.tripod.com/

A overpriced guide and a private ranch hunt is the LAST thing most guys need to score on their first elk.

Good luck.

Edited by silvertip-co, 28 June 2009 - 07:55 AM.

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#4 bonecollector34

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 10:19 AM

I have killed some of my best bulls on public land and never used a guide. Look at the state at which you chose to hunt, then look at the areas that hold elk success rates on harvests, make sure there is no wilderness areas in that area as most states will not allow a non resident to hunt in them without a resident or guide.

Good glass, strong legs and shoot straight

easy

BC


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#5 Spirithawk

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Posted 28 June 2009 - 07:34 PM

Well, I may only be dreaming. It's something I'd dearly love to do with Jason, he want's to hunt Elk bad, but my lungs are in pretty sad shape. They are badly scarred and both have collapsed twice already. I do a lot of walking here. Much of it up and down hills over some pretty rough terrain. Paul knows the terrain here. lol I refuse to give up and I just pretty much have to pace myself. I can cover a lot of ground that way and Jason and I often walk several miles to get to and from a good hunting spot. I'm not sure how I'd do in thinner air at higher altitudes though. I hadn't thought of that. My legs are still quite strong but I have good days and bad. Here I have the advantage of being able to fall back on our ATV if I need to. I have a permit from the Missouri Dept. of Conservation to hunt from a stationary vehicle which allows me to use any wheeled vehicle to get to my hunting spot. If I can figure a way to do it I really want to hunt Elk with Jason. That would be truly awesome. Like they say, "Where there's a will there's a way." I just have to find it. Thanks for the advice guys. Posted Image

Edited by Spirithawk, 28 June 2009 - 07:39 PM.


#6 bonecollector34

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 12:37 AM

It is very doable sir, very doable indeed.

if your gonna do it then start working on it and MAKE it happen

BC


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#7 Phil

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 04:41 AM

My humble opinion....
...you can make it happen, somehow-someway.
The only advice I can really offer as far as a hunting tip(applies to any game animal) is to follow your first hunch. Too many times we as hunters second guess that "gut feeling" and end up with unfilled tags and kicking ourselves for not trusting our instincts. The three most important rules to follow while hunting 1) Listen to the guide 2) LISTEN Too the guide 3)LISTEN TOO THE GUIDE....especially on a solo outing !
* I'm talking about the hunter within each of us that for some unknown reson causes us to stop and study a certain piece of cover with extra scrutiny.Posted Image Ahhh...Norm, you've got Native American heritage so you know exactly what I'm talking about! Posted Image
Posted Image

#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 07:03 AM

Well I certainly am no expert but did experience just what you are contemplating. We camped at over 9000 ft and hunted from that altitude up to 14,000 ft. Believe me the air is thin at those altitudes. One day we drove to around 12000 and walked all the way to about 14000. That walk was a rather long and for the most part a gradual upgrade. Even though, we had to take it easy as we would get winded quickly. We just took our time and stopped more frequently than we would normally but then again we searched the nooks and crannies more thoroughly that way and made less noise. On another foray at about 11000 feet we actually ended up 2.6 miles as the crow flies from our truck. One of our problems was the elk we were hunting had been hunted for about three weeks prior to our arrival and were already tucked back in and in the rough spots. Elk country is big, I mean really big and they can be anywhere but if pursued will be further back in. Also if you get one you must bring all the meat out. That can mean heavy packs and a long walk.
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#9 silvertip-co

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 07:15 AM

Well, I may only be dreaming. It's something I'd dearly love to do with Jason, he want's to hunt Elk bad, but my lungs are in pretty sad shape. They are badly scarred and both have collapsed twice already. I do a lot of walking here. Much of it up and down hills over some pretty rough terrain. Paul knows the terrain here. lol I refuse to give up and I just pretty much have to pace myself. I can cover a lot of ground that way and Jason and I often walk several miles to get to and from a good hunting spot. I'm not sure how I'd do in thinner air at higher altitudes though. I hadn't thought of that. My legs are still quite strong but I have good days and bad. Here I have the advantage of being able to fall back on our ATV if I need to. I have a permit from the Missouri Dept. of Conservation to hunt from a stationary vehicle which allows me to use any wheeled vehicle to get to my hunting spot. If I can figure a way to do it I really want to hunt Elk with Jason. That would be truly awesome. Like they say, "Where there's a will there's a way." I just have to find it. Thanks for the advice guys. Posted Image



Dont let bad lungs stop ya. I've had bad lungs for 58yrs and 10mo and it dont stop me, and I too have had numerous pneu and one coll lung in past. It is best if you come to the high country to get there a few days or week early to adapt to the alt or you could get sick. I got alt sick in 08 all at once it just hit me and I was down, this after being out here for 8 yrs and spending tons of time in the high country. Good luck on your elk hunt.
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#10 McBruce

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:43 PM

I'm gonna raise eye brows here.....guys talk about hunting em high. .... honestly. elk are alot smarter then most hunters.

ya see I live at 10.000 ft + and yes we hike up hill to find the elk. We also watch where there is no pressure during season. Last year, ( directly behind my house ) is a pasture. yep a good old fashion cattle pasture/ blm land. Now on 3 sides of that pasture is private sub division and behind the sub division is national forest. I could sit at my desk and watch the elk out in the middle of that pasture bedding down and spend the whole day out there, while hunter after hunter was seen trying to figure out how to access them. if you came in from the front, you were shooting into houses.

I've archery hunted elk....and hiked down the mtn after a long day and kicked them out of their beds not 30 yards from a major hwy, next and across the road is 2 of colorados largest ski resorts.

The largest bull I ever saw was crossing the Peak 10 solom race slope durring archery season, 150 yards up hill from me. ( at the Breckenridge ski resort )

I've driven down to Denver and seen elk all along the way and you'd be amazed at the elk around Evergreen. 7,000 ft elevation.
they live in peoples yards down there.


you don't have to go high, you don't have to go miles into the back country, you need to hunt smart. They have adapted to humans and are all around us. LOL just tonight I came across elk tracks in my yard, week ago I got pictures of elk walking down the road in front of my house. .... watched 7 bulls at dusk, grazing in the private space behind the local fire dept.


Everyone talks about how they dissappear come hunting season...and trust me they do. But they are usually going into areas where they can simply escape the pressure, and they know where those areas are. Some times its up high where men with common sense don't want to hunt, other times it's bedding down right behind a subdivision and watching all the jeeps and quads go by into the back country :)

Now late season rifle...head to Craig Co. .... Ron and his crew would head up there and usually tag out every year.
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#11 Spirithawk

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Posted 08 July 2009 - 10:54 PM

My humble opinion....
...you can make it happen, somehow-someway.
The only advice I can really offer as far as a hunting tip(applies to any game animal) is to follow your first hunch. Too many times we as hunters second guess that "gut feeling" and end up with unfilled tags and kicking ourselves for not trusting our instincts. The three most important rules to follow while hunting 1) Listen to the guide 2) LISTEN Too the guide 3)LISTEN TOO THE GUIDE....especially on a solo outing !
* I'm talking about the hunter within each of us that for some unknown reson causes us to stop and study a certain piece of cover with extra scrutiny.Posted Image Ahhh...Norm, you've got Native American heritage so you know exactly what I'm talking about! Posted Image



I'm pretty stubborn guys. I spent two years in the area of Denver so I'm familiar with the thin air. I'm not giving up on the dream just yet. I know exactly what you're talking about Phil. It use to drive the guys I hunted with crazy. I'd walk out to a spot and within minutes shoot a deer. They would beg me to tell them how I did it. Tried telling them it was just something I felt. They thought I was nuts. lol It's true though, I can walk into an area where everything says there should be deer, but for some reason it just don't feel right. If I force myself to sit there I rarely ever see a deer either. But I can walk into a spot that I've never been, get that feeling, and in less than an hour kill a deer. Jason is starting to develope that sense too, and he's consistantly killing more deer. :)

#12 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 08:13 AM

Norm I suppose other than Jason I am closest to your situation than anyone else on this board. If you can take your quads along they can get you to where you are going rather than having to walk all the way. Where we hunted in Colorado there were several roads that would get you to the top or about everywhere in between. It is so much easier to walk at 10,000 than having to climb to that level. When we were out there Elkhunter 40 had a quad that he used to get all the way to the top of the mountain. The only thing was the elk just were not that high. The elk we encountered were well down off the top. One morning I had a bull bugling way down below me while I sat at around 10,000 ft. I truly believe that elk was way down near the valley floor. I would have had to go down some very steep terrain to get there and we had a drive of sorts set up and I would have messed that up if I moved. As Bruce said it is doable. Just approach the whole situation with your hunter wisdom. Hey we don't hunt fast and furious we hunt slow and stealthy.
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#13 Spirithawk

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Posted 09 July 2009 - 09:37 AM

Norm I suppose other than Jason I am closest to your situation than anyone else on this board. If you can take your quads along they can get you to where you are going rather than having to walk all the way. Where we hunted in Colorado there were several roads that would get you to the top or about everywhere in between. It is so much easier to walk at 10,000 than having to climb to that level. When we were out there Elkhunter 40 had a quad that he used to get all the way to the top of the mountain. The only thing was the elk just were not that high. The elk we encountered were well down off the top. One morning I had a bull bugling way down below me while I sat at around 10,000 ft. I truly believe that elk was way down near the valley floor. I would have had to go down some very steep terrain to get there and we had a drive of sorts set up and I would have messed that up if I moved. As Bruce said it is doable. Just approach the whole situation with your hunter wisdom. Hey we don't hunt fast and furious we hunt slow and stealthy.



That's a pretty good idea Paul. I know I find myself using a quad more and more here at home. Many times I'd not be able to hunt without it.

#14 elkhunter40

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 06:21 PM

"Now late season rifle...head to Craig Co. .... Ron and his crew would head upthere and usually tag out every year."




Hi :bye:

It has been sometime since I posted on this site, I do drop in to see how things are going with you guys.

It was a busy spring and summer for me. I went on a vacation for two weeks at the end of July with the motorcycles to Yellow stone, then out to the mountains of Ogden Utah and then for a week in Sturgis. This ride left me short on vacation days for the rest of the year to do any long hunting trips.

Some of my co-workers and I put in for five late season cow tags, we did draw the tags:bigthumb:. The plan is to head out on Dec. 24 or 25 for a three day hunt out in the northwestern part of Co. If things work out we may need to get a overload permit for the trucks


Next year I will save sometime to hunt with you out in Colorado:hunter:

Good luck to you all this hunting season, Be safe.

Ron

aka elkhunter40

Edited by elkhunter40, 26 August 2009 - 06:22 PM.


#15 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 07:05 PM

Hey Ron good to hear from you.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




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