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Treestand Safety


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#1 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 09:03 PM

First and foremost, buy stands that are tested by the Treestand Manufacturers Association. I, like you, have seen some "cheap" stands, especially online (most likely made out of someone's garage), that have price tags that are tempting. But, the TMA is sort of like Underwriters Laboratories for the hunter. They are out there to test product (in this case, treestands) to ensure that they meet or exceed a standard of performance and safety. If your stand manufacturer has opted not to send product to the TMA for testing then you truly do not know for sure if what you are using will even live up to the manufacturer's claims, let alone to the accepted standard of safety. (Knowing more than my fair share of hunters who have either fallen or had bad accidents involving treestands, that is a risk I truly hate to see anyone take.) Besides, I just purchased two hang-on stands and two ladder sticks for $35 a piece and each is TMA certified! So, I'm afraid that even the all-mighty dollar isn't an excuse. (I don't even think it's possible to build your own any cheaper.)

Now that we have that out of the way, please bookmark the TMA Web Site! Any time you purchase a new treestand, always make it a habit to visit the TMA web site and check for any product recalls before using any items. I have seen everything from stands to fall restraints come up under recall on the TMA site. If nothing else, you owe it to yourself and your loved ones to be as safe as possible while afield.

The rest of the staff and I intend to periodically reply to this topic with any recall news we see from popular manufacturers or anything that strikes us as important or widespread.

Do you feel you are up on the latest treestand safety techniques?
Well, take the Online Treestand Safety Course and find out for sure!

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

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#2 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 10:07 AM

The Latest News on Suspension Trauma

I encourage everyone here who hunts from a treestand to read the following article and watch this video. We all know that a full body suspension arrest system is a must. But, as with many things, we tend to learn more about certain things as time goes by. We are now aware that, If the fall doesn't kill you... hanging suspended for too long likely will.
Please read on...

Dr. Norman Wood Speaks on Suspension Trauma


PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

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#3 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 10:49 AM

Tuesday, November 9, 2010
Don't Just Hang There! Live to Hunt Another Day™

Many hunters mistakenly believe they can safely hang in their full body harness for an extended period of time if they experience a fall from a treestand. That misunderstanding could cost them their lives.

Dr. Norman Wood, owner of Mountaineer Sports, the authority on treestand fall protection, sends this message to hunters, "Don't just hang there, doing so could kill you!"

As Wood explains, suspension trauma is the culprit. "If hunters are not able to return to the treestand after a fall they need to take measures to relieve suspension trauma. The life threatening tourniquet action results in Blood Pooling. The longer you hang in your harness the less and less blood there is to circulate through the heart and lungs to keep you alive. "

Hunters must use their fall protection correctly. "It is not enough to just wear your full body harness, you must also keep your suspension relief strap easily accessible in the event of a fall. A properly used strap enables you to take pressure off your legs to help prevent suspension trauma. Many full body harnesses include this type of strap with their units, but too often hunters toss the strap away or leave it in a pack where it may not be accessible," explains Woods. "This mistake could cost you your life."

Mountaineer Sports is Revolutionizing Fall Safety™ by offering the Rescue One CDS™ a full body harness that not only includes a suspension relief strap built right into the system, but also enables the hunter to safely lower to the ground by utilizing the patented controlled descent system.

For a video demonstration of the Rescue One CDS II™ and more information about avoiding suspension trauma and ways to stay safe in your harness visit www.rescueonecds.com or call 1-877-683-7678 or Email mountaineersports@live.com. Contact:
Dr. Norman Wood 1-877-683-7678 mountaineersports@live.com


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