Jump to content


Photo

Stick-On Flipper Rest


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Honky Cat

Honky Cat

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lucasville, OH
  • Interests:Church, Family, Friends. One and the same.

Posted 27 September 2009 - 03:33 PM

hey guys, I have been using a stick-on flipper rest for about two years now without a major problem. I tried a drop away, but it held the shaft too far left of center and could not be adjusted any farther to the right. Turns out the cut out on my PSE recurve really only allows for a few options. I can't help but worry about the flipper a little though because it has shaved off my fletching a couple of times. That means it must be hitting pretty hard passing through there. If the sticky part should wear out in the woods, it would be an annoying reason to pack up early. I would like to know If there is a more permanant/ reliable way to perform this function. I haven't heard any testimonies about the hair rest but I was told I would have to switch to soft fletching to shoot right off the bow like that (obviously). Hit me up with some options and I will be eternally greatful.
Don't pray for a light load. Pray for a strong back.

#2 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

    Hunting Resource

  • Owner/Admin
  • 3,087 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Pennsylvania
  • Interests:God, Family, Hunting, Archery, Outdoors, Computers, Website Development...

Posted 27 September 2009 - 04:14 PM

As you are learning, even the best quality Flipper-style rests leave some things to be desired. There are several solid alternative options assuming the bow has a Berger Button hole threaded through the riser. (Which, apparently it does.) As you have already learned, however, "centershot" rests (including drop-aways) aren't really amongst them.

One option is a "finger shooter" or "shoot around" rest such as this. (Mind you, I've shot these with fingers as well as mechanical release.) The inner blade can be set in nice and tight to the riser (even bent in some if need be) in order to provide for just enough clearance for the vanes to pass the riser. This rest would still be shot ###### vane out, like your current Flipper rest. It basically mimics a Flipper's form, but with far better fletching clearance and durability.

Another option (my preferred for bows without recessed centershot) is going with a "plunger rest". It looks something like this picture...
Posted Image
Unfortunately, Golden Key Futura, long time makers of this rest, were bought out by another company and that model rest is no longer available that I'm aware of. However, you can still purchase a rest such as this and take one of the prongs off. Then, purchase just a plunger button. The plunger button replaces the rest mounting bolt and you mount the rest as usual. You then adjust the plunger in and out by turning it on the threads until the spring-loaded teflon or brass tip is protruding through the riser just enough to hold the arrow the proper distance away from the riser. You then move the rest prong inward until, in conjunction with the plunger button, it cradles the arrow.

It's getting harder to find this type of stuff now. There just aren't too many people shooting fingers anymore and even fewer bows made that need such rests anymore. So, as you see, it may come down to making something work. Or, if you can find an archery shop that has been in business a good while you should be able to go in and ask for a "plunger rest" (a.k.a. "pressure rest" a.k.a. "finger rest") and have someone there be able to guide you.

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

sig_admin.png


#3 Leo

Leo

    Hunting Resource

  • Administrators
  • 3,155 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina

Posted 27 September 2009 - 05:21 PM

It's been awhile since I've shot my recurve and in fact it still is equipped with a flipper rest. The reason the flipper is on there is to shoot vanes instead of feather fletching. And vane fletched arrows were what I had "upgraded" to.

To be honest, this is what I find. Shooting instinctively with a recurve, feathers and "off your fist" is the most accurate way to go. Arrows go much more predictably where my left index finger is pointing if I shoot off the fist versus using any rest on a recurve. Recurves typically aren't "center shot" bows. The extra forgiveness that feathers give you is actually needed (in my opinion) to get the ultimate accuracy on a recurve.

Bottom line, when I get new arrows for the recurve they will be feather fletched and the flipper is coming off! It's a good rest and I can make it work on my recurve but truthfully I don't think they serve a recurve well.
Posted Image

#4 irinman2424

irinman2424

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 728 posts

Posted 28 September 2009 - 02:11 PM

what can be done with a bow that had/has the stick on flipper rest that is inoperable? and there is not a hole there for any other type of rest is there anything out there or do I have to find another stick on flipper rest?
I believe in fillet and release!

Posted Image

#5 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

    Hunting Resource

  • Owner/Admin
  • 3,087 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Pennsylvania
  • Interests:God, Family, Hunting, Archery, Outdoors, Computers, Website Development...

Posted 28 September 2009 - 03:22 PM

what can be done with a bow that had/has the stick on flipper rest that is inoperable? and there is not a hole there for any other type of rest is there anything out there or do I have to find another stick on flipper rest?


It depends. If the arrow shelf is radiused (has a crown or arc to it) then I would put a BearHair rest on it and "shoot off the shelf" sort of like Leo is talking about. If the shelf is flat, however, I'd sooner shoot something like a Flipper II than off the shelf. In either case, you really need to be shooting natural feathers for good arrow flight.

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

sig_admin.png


#6 irinman2424

irinman2424

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 728 posts

Posted 28 September 2009 - 05:22 PM

well what it is is a friend of mine gave me a Bear whitetail hunter to use untill I can get a new bow (granted old but will work) it needs a peep put on it and the plastic shelf flipper that was on it is broke off it is one that just sticks on there is not a hole under it to mount anything to it as far as wiskerbisquit or anything so am trying to find out my options on what I can do with it. this bow is brand new he only shot it 12-15 times got frusterated and its been in his closet for 20-22 years. I may just end up going and seeing if I can find another stick on rest and go from there (if I can find one of them LOL) would a shop be able to drill it out to put on a regular rest?
I believe in fillet and release!

Posted Image

#7 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

    Hunting Resource

  • Owner/Admin
  • 3,087 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Pennsylvania
  • Interests:God, Family, Hunting, Archery, Outdoors, Computers, Website Development...

Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:00 PM

well what it is is a friend of mine gave me a Bear whitetail hunter to use untill I can get a new bow (granted old but will work) it needs a peep put on it and the plastic shelf flipper that was on it is broke off it is one that just sticks on there is not a hole under it to mount anything to it as far as wiskerbisquit or anything so am trying to find out my options on what I can do with it. this bow is brand new he only shot it 12-15 times got frusterated and its been in his closet for 20-22 years. I may just end up going and seeing if I can find another stick on rest and go from there (if I can find one of them LOL) would a shop be able to drill it out to put on a regular rest?


There is a dimple on the back side of the Bear Whitetail Hunter riser right where the Berger Button hold needs to be. (I've got one hanging on my wall. Was my first compound tons of years ago. :) ) Many a person simply drilled through the riser (drill press) and then tapped the hole to accept a plunger rest. (You still wouldn't want to use anything like a Whisker Biscuit because there wouldn't be enough riser cutout around the shelf to shoot ###### vane up, the way a WB is meant to be shot.) Bear in mind that I'm not personally advocating doing this. I'm just putting it out there.

A slightly higher quality stick on rest like the Flipper II I linked to above is still the easiest option. That's what I shot many years ago when I still shot the Whitetail Hunter. (Shelf was flat, so no BearHair. :( )

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

sig_admin.png


#8 Honky Cat

Honky Cat

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lucasville, OH
  • Interests:Church, Family, Friends. One and the same.

Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:06 PM

As you are learning, even the best quality Flipper-style rests leave some things to be desired. There are several solid alternative options assuming the bow has a Berger Button hole threaded through the riser. (Which, apparently it does.) As you have already learned, however, "centershot" rests (including drop-aways) aren't really amongst them.

One option is a "finger shooter" or "shoot around" rest such as this. (Mind you, I've shot these with fingers as well as mechanical release.) The inner blade can be set in nice and tight to the riser (even bent in some if need be) in order to provide for just enough clearance for the vanes to pass the riser. This rest would still be shot ###### vane out, like your current Flipper rest. It basically mimics a Flipper's form, but with far better fletching clearance and durability.

Another option (my preferred for bows without recessed centershot) is going with a "plunger rest". It looks something like this picture...
Posted Image
Unfortunately, Golden Key Futura, long time makers of this rest, were bought out by another company and that model rest is no longer available that I'm aware of. However, you can still purchase a rest such as this and take one of the prongs off. Then, purchase just a plunger button. The plunger button replaces the rest mounting bolt and you mount the rest as usual. You then adjust the plunger in and out by turning it on the threads until the spring-loaded teflon or brass tip is protruding through the riser just enough to hold the arrow the proper distance away from the riser. You then move the rest prong inward until, in conjunction with the plunger button, it cradles the arrow.

It's getting harder to find this type of stuff now. There just aren't too many people shooting fingers anymore and even fewer bows made that need such rests anymore. So, as you see, it may come down to making something work. Or, if you can find an archery shop that has been in business a good while you should be able to go in and ask for a "plunger rest" (a.k.a. "pressure rest" a.k.a. "finger rest") and have someone there be able to guide you.





Okay, eternal gratitude to Jerimiah and Leo. I was afraid that you guys would recommend feathers. Not that I don't like 'em, it's just that I don't really want to pay to have the work done. I imagine I could glue them on straight, but the vanes I have are sorta helical to spriral the arrow in flight and thats just too cool to mess up, right? : ) As far as the rest goes, I like simple. The back of my hand is pretty durable (that's what she said) and already paid for. So I'll try that first before dropping any cash that I don't have. If you remember, last year I was whining about bare fingers hurting and no luck with any type of protection. Well, it turns out, all I had to do is draw the string on the inside of my first knuckle instead of using my fingertips. It doesn't hurt my release any and now I want to get heavier limbs. I tried to price some 60 pounders on the PSE website but they didn't offer them as best as I could tell. I expect the price will be too high for me at the moment but do you folks know if this kind of upgrade can be done and where I might look. Just to save you a little time if you decide to look, They sell Impalas from #40-#60 in #5 increments so I figure the riser is good for it.
Don't pray for a light load. Pray for a strong back.

#9 Jeremiah

Jeremiah

    Hunting Resource

  • Owner/Admin
  • 3,087 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western Pennsylvania
  • Interests:God, Family, Hunting, Archery, Outdoors, Computers, Website Development...

Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:30 PM

Okay, eternal gratitude to Jerimiah and Leo. I was afraid that you guys would recommend feathers. Not that I don't like 'em, it's just that I don't really want to pay to have the work done. I imagine I could glue them on straight, but the vanes I have are sorta helical to spriral the arrow in flight and thats just too cool to mess up, right? : ) As far as the rest goes, I like simple. The back of my hand is pretty durable (that's what she said) and already paid for. So I'll try that first before dropping any cash that I don't have. If you remember, last year I was whining about bare fingers hurting and no luck with any type of protection. Well, it turns out, all I had to do is draw the string on the inside of my first knuckle instead of using my fingertips. It doesn't hurt my release any and now I want to get heavier limbs. I tried to price some 60 pounders on the PSE website but they didn't offer them as best as I could tell. I expect the price will be too high for me at the moment but do you folks know if this kind of upgrade can be done and where I might look. Just to save you a little time if you decide to look, They sell Impalas from #40-#60 in #5 increments so I figure the riser is good for it.


Yes, you can get just limbs for the Impala. I have no clue what they may cost. Your best bet is a local archery shop or sporting goods store that deals PSE or can order through a distributor such as Kinsey's, Pape's, etc. You could try ebay or an online classifieds site, but you just never know what you're getting there. (Your call.)

What I do know is that the Impala has a radiused shelf! You really, really, really need to strongly consider taking the current rest off and going with the BearHair. You will absolutely get better performance with feathers, but even shooting vanes you're better off shooting off the shelf, IMO.

PA IHEA & NBEF/IBEP Instructor

sig_admin.png


#10 irinman2424

irinman2424

    Can Charge Rent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 728 posts

Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:02 PM

thank you for the input on this and it is as I thought (feared) LOL
I believe in fillet and release!

Posted Image

#11 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 06 October 2009 - 03:39 PM

Way back in the day I used a flipper rest on all my bows hunting or otherwise. As I recall there were two types of flipper rests. One that operated from above and one that was mounted beneath. I seem to recall that the one that supported from beneath was the flipper II. When the Berger button came out just about everyone bought one. It is a cushion plunger that came with several strengths of springs and was adjustable as to the degree of centershot. I recall having to replace the double stick tape several times on several of the flipper rests. I once used duct tape with a hole cut into it to make sure the flipper stayed put on my hunting setup. You have to be careful as the flipper rest is spring loaded and can get messed up or gunked up to the point it does not operate properly. As I recall the flipper rests came with a teflon tube covering the actual wire that supports the arrow.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#12 bowmaker

bowmaker

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:archery, boyscouts

Posted 07 February 2011 - 05:04 PM

I have a PSE recurve and had bought a stick on flipper rest, but... after shooting it 1,001 times (exaggeration) the rest has eventually worn through, thus enabling my arrow to slide off 95% of the time. I tried to remove it but it left a sticky mess on my bow, any suggestions??



#13 TerryfromAR

TerryfromAR

    Hunting Resource

  • Moderators
  • 1,608 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texarkana, TX
  • Interests:Hunting, fishing, spending time with my kids and wife, anything that gets me out of the house especially pertaining to my outdoor persuits. computers, technology, movies,

Posted 07 February 2011 - 07:38 PM

Bowmaker 2 words... Goo Gone! It smells like oranges and works great for glue removal.
Semper Fi

#14 Geoff / TBow

Geoff / TBow

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 487 posts

Posted 02 April 2011 - 09:36 PM

I realize it's late for a comment on this thread, but what the heck. It's been a boring day and I've got nothing but time on my hands.

1. I used to shoot a Flipper Rest on an old Browning recurve (I still have it). Although it was nice on the range or for practicing, it was WAY too flimsy for taking into the bush. It broke off a couple times, hence I always made sure to carry a spare in my pack. It caused me a lot of frustration in hunting situations and I would never personally use one ever again. Robust for field situations is muchos importante! My Browning now sports a rug on the shelf with a leather backing plate and I shoot straight offset feathers with it. On a couple of my other bows I merely use a Bear Weatherest for it's ability to be virtually impervious to everything nature can throw at it. They're especially great for bowfishing, but the drawback is that vanes tend to kick sideways off it causing fishtailing.

2. I have always shot fingers and only ever once tried about 10 shots with a release when they were fist on the market. I think it was an Allen Hunting release. DID NOT LIKE IT! I always shoot off the tips of my fingers and get better releases than holding on the first joint of the fingers. You tend to pluck the string on the joints as opposed to relaxing your fingers and allowing the string to slip away from your finger tips. I shoot bare fingers and do not use a glove or tab as I like to feel the string. It gives me greater confidence in my shooting (which really isn't all that great to be honest). I do however use "NO-GLUV" nocks on my strings. Most shooters do not like them because they fatten the string. More of the string has to get out of the way to pass the fingers, and again, if not released in a relaxed finger mode, it can cause fishtailing. I've used them for over 35 years and have gotten accustomed to them, and now have them on all of my bows, even my compounds.....yes even my Mathews.

3. I use one of the finger shooting arrow rests as described by Jer. I shoot it off my Mathews. It's a Kenetronic by Bear and is quite inexpensive. I saw a few of them on Ebay just tonight for around $8.00. It'll shoot feathers or vanes with good clearance, and is quite rubust by comparison to a Flipper Rest.

O.K. This is good. I've killed another 15 minutes just writing this post. NEXT! :rolleyes:

Geoff / TBow
Every day you`re fortunate enough to wake up breathing, is cause for celebration!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users