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Cutting Competition


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#1 Leo

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 05:02 PM

This doesn't look easy!




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#2 TerryfromAR

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 06:35 PM

WOW I wonder if they have any regulations on blade steel, or style? My preferred blade is my KaBar... LOL I know I can hack through a deer's hip sockets in about 2 swipes if my aim is true.....
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#3 Leo

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 06:58 PM

I don't know what the regs are Terry.

I do know that after slicing the tops off a row of coke bottles filled with water and than swiping the end off a drinking straw standing on end takes a heck of a durable knife!

After everything they put the knife through the final stage is chopping full width through a 2x8!

Not too mention the torture it puts the knife through that competition has to be one heck of a workout.
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#4 TerryfromAR

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 08:28 PM

Leo I see what you're talking about. My experience with my Kabar is that It's a VERY durable knife. Takes forever to sharpen, but once it's sharp, it will hold an edge. It's a heavy bladed knife that when it's sharp it can split a hair.... but I always seem to get the bevel just a little bit off somehow. I can get it shaving sharp no problem, but I know the potential is there to get it sharper, I know I need to invest in a good extra smooth polishing stone to get the finest possible edge, and I've heard marble and ceramic are the 2 best, what do you think?

Lot of sore hands in that competition I'm sure.....

Edited by TerryfromAR, 10 October 2009 - 08:30 PM.

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#5 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 10:12 AM

Thanks Leo for sharing that.

Man that's some lethal steel those guys are swinging. Sharp doesn't seem to cut it, excuse the pone, to describe the blades shown working on here. My knives I own are sharp but seem terribly inadequate and inferior when compared to these. Posted Image


Awesome demo of what a real knife can do.
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#6 Leo

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 10:12 AM

Leo I see what you're talking about. My experience with my Kabar is that It's a VERY durable knife. Takes forever to sharpen, but once it's sharp, it will hold an edge. It's a heavy bladed knife that when it's sharp it can split a hair.... but I always seem to get the bevel just a little bit off somehow. I can get it shaving sharp no problem, but I know the potential is there to get it sharper, I know I need to invest in a good extra smooth polishing stone to get the finest possible edge, and I've heard marble and ceramic are the 2 best, what do you think?

Lot of sore hands in that competition I'm sure.....


First make sure you remove the burr from sharpening with your stones. Dragging the edge thru soft wood will do this. With just the weight of the blade on the edge of the wood let the blade try to saw into the wood. I pull from start of the edge to tip only. Don't saw back and forth! About 2 or 3 times will do it. If the blade edge is rolled you'll still feel it after this. Straighten it out with a steel or ceramic.

Stropping the blade on some 2000grit automotive wet dry sandpaper glued to a tile or piece of glass is a cheap solution. Keep the sandpaper clean with Butcher Block oil (mineral oil) and wipe with a clean rag.

Then try a final stropping on corrugated cardboard.
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#7 Hammerforged

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 09:46 PM

The competition changes as the circuit progresses. The general guidelines for the knife used in the competition is that the knife must be hand-forged by the user, the blade can be no longer than 10 1/2 inches and no wider than 2 inches. There MUST be a lanyard attached and in use. The blade is checked by the judges between each phase of the competition for any chipping, waving of the edge, etc. If any is found then that competitor is DQ'd. These competitions were started as a way for we the smiths to test our blades against each other and to learn where we could improve on our forging techniques. The competition has grown considerably over the past several years. My favorite part is still the water bottle cut. When your time comes for this part of the competition you must give the judge a number, this number is the number of full water bottles you believe you can cleanly cut in half in a single stroke of your knife. You get points for every bottle cleanly cut in half but you lose points for every bottle that is not cleanly cut in half. I believe the current record is 16 bottles but I could be wrong on that, I haven't heard from the latest Hammer-In. The toughest part of the competition for me is the rolling hardwood dowel cut. A 1/2 inch hardwood dowel is run out on rubber band and the goal is to cleanly cut the dowel in half while it is retracting back on the rubber band. I am just not quick enough most times. If any of you are ever in Atlanta in June you owe it to yourself to visit the Blade Show at the Cobb Galleria Centre and see one of these competitions in person.




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