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#1 Larry $

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 07:14 PM

Here's a handy hint for saving money on expensive ammunition while zeroing a 7mm mag.

Up and down does NOT equal left and right

The zeroing process goes much smoother if this one simple procedural fact is observed while adjusting the 'scope.

In all fairness, McBruce was a good friend and managed to stifle most of his snickers when I learned this important truth too late.
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#2 runNgun

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 07:51 PM

Thanks for the tip Posted Image










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#3 Phil

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 03:09 AM

A tip that was featured in a shooting article I read years ago is very effective....called the 2 shot sight in.
Its critical that you have a solid bench set-up to do this.
Once a scope is bore sighted, take the 1st shot.
Now, sight in on center bullseye(regardless of where 1st shot hit target) and lock down rifle solidly however possible.
While the shooter looks through scope and keeps the rifle steady, have an assistant carefully adjust the scope and"walk the crosshairs" from center bullseye to zero in on hole from 1st bullet.
Once accomplished the 2nd shot will be dead-on....or extremely close.
I've used this more than once and it works excellent....but I like to shoot so I always take a few extra shots just to fine tune. Some might argue reasons against this but think about this method for making an emergency sight-in on a trip hunting where a scope gets knocked out of adjustment and the hunter has a limited amount on ammo available.....a backpack for a rest & a stump for a backstop ....this might save a hunting trip.Posted Image

*btw...if you prefer to sight-in an inch or so high at 100 yards, then use that spot as your crosshair center.

Edited by Phil, 14 October 2009 - 03:12 AM.

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#4 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 07:24 AM

A tip that was featured in a shooting article I read years ago is very effective....called the 2 shot sight in.
Its critical that you have a solid bench set-up to do this.
Once a scope is bore sighted, take the 1st shot.
Now, sight in on center bullseye(regardless of where 1st shot hit target) and lock down rifle solidly however possible.
While the shooter looks through scope and keeps the rifle steady, have an assistant carefully adjust the scope and"walk the crosshairs" from center bullseye to zero in on hole from 1st bullet.
Once accomplished the 2nd shot will be dead-on....or extremely close.
I've used this more than once and it works excellent....but I like to shoot so I always take a few extra shots just to fine tune. Some might argue reasons against this but think about this method for making an emergency sight-in on a trip hunting where a scope gets knocked out of adjustment and the hunter has a limited amount on ammo available.....a backpack for a rest & a stump for a backstop ....this might save a hunting trip.Posted Image

*btw...if you prefer to sight-in an inch or so high at 100 yards, then use that spot as your crosshair center.



Phil that's a great method and I read something like that too. I used it on my shotgun(rifled barrel for sabots), muzzle loader and my .243. I found a Caldwell Lead Sled on sale before I started at the range. It holds you on target real steady for bore sighting or sighting in setup. It's important to try a bore sighter first to get you on paper and then take that first shot at the bullseye on your paper. Then follow what Phil said, he has it down. You simply dial your cross hairs to that first hole and you're done. I like to start at 50 yards then move it out to 100 yards. One thing I have heard is don't clamp your lead sled or rest down tight to the bench. The energy of the recoil has to be spent and that is why you use weight resting on the sled so it can deliver that energy into the weight. The guys that run the range said they have seen some damage done to big bore rifles because the shooter didn't use the weight but strapped it down to the permanent benches at the range.
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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:24 AM

Yes this is a good sight in method. Just a couple of other tips. After you shoot and then center the crosshairs on the bullseye by adjusting the rifle/rest you will find you may turn the scope adjustments opposite of what they indicate. Remember you are moving the crosshairs to a predermined point i.e. your first bullet hole. In other words if you want to move your point of impact left you actually are moving the crosshairs to the right and same for up and down. The accuracy of this method depends on the stability of the rifle in the rest. Any movement of the rifle during the scope adjustments throws the whole thing off.

Also I have read several places that a lead sled although great for absorbing recoil may lead to problems sighting in. In other words a rifle sighted in on a lead sled may shoot to a different point of impact from the shoulder. It is crucial that at least a shot from the shoulder be done after sighting in from a solid or recoil absorbing rest to assure the rifle still shoots to the same point of impact.
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#6 McBruce

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:38 AM

I didn't snicker....not even under my breath, I know how frustrating it is, when the bullets are going all over the place.

I had a leoplud scope go bad on me. Now it was 15 years old, but that ole 243 of mine was a tack driver and I couldn't zero it in.

no matter what I did. Finally I put a different scope on the rifle after boxes of ammo and zero'd it in , less then 6 shots.

Sent the scope in and for the shipping cost to get it to them they fixed everything, re sealed it and sent it back good as new.

I really was suspecting Larry's scope had gone bad.

Then he let out a grunt of disgust. Well....3 bullets left and I was turning the wrong adjustments.

trust me there was no snickering.....more of a relief we figured out what had happened.

now I might have rubbed it in a bit....ringing the 300 yard gong over and over with my 223 ;) but what are friends for ? LOL.
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