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What New Gear Have You Used ?


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#1 McBruce

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:59 AM

Part of the purpose of HR is to share information with each other. In some ways its writing reviews on new gear we have used or come across, or a good outfitter, even sharing how to stay away from a bad outfitter. Its not always the bow or the rifle. sometimes its that new powder scale or the day pack. Even like leo's post about his birthday gift and the knife he got. Those things hold some real value when you are looking at spending hard earned money on new gear.

This last week, I came across 2 items that are now on my wish list. First is the

Cabela's Chef's Choice Sportsmans Hunting Knife Sharpener:
Knife Sharpener

When JT and I took off after the elk, we left everything behind, minus ourselves, the rifle and a license. Neither of us grabbed our day packs. ( which contained our hunting knives and such )
After the shot and now the work began of skinning and quartering. Between the two of us, we had JT's Jack Knife. A little 3 inch bladed folding knife that most ranchers would never be with out. He hands it to me and says start skinning I'll hike back and get day packs to pack out the elk and get our knives and such.

I flipped open the knife, looked at it and went Oh man this could be a long day, skinning out an elk with a jack knife. Then I made my first cut. I could have been using a razor knife or box cutter. I was amazed at a pocket knife being that sharp.

Later when we were processing the meat, JT pulled out the Cabelas knife sharpener and as we would dull a knife we would wash it and dry it and set it aside. Once we had 2 or 3 knives dull we would run them through the sharpener. The trick, don't roll them. Place in and pull straight through. 3 maybe 4 passes on stage one, then 2 passes on stage 3 and you had a razor sharp knife again.

There is a honing center section which puts a micro serration on the knife if you want that. For heavy bladed hunting knifes and being out in the field this can be a benefit. Not something I would use much, but a nice option.

Yes I have my hand diamond stone sharpeners. and yes there are certain knives I own that will ONLY be sharpened that way. But the Cabela's Sportsman's Sharpener sure has a place for putting a fast razor sharp edge on knives when you are processing your game.


2nd item I came across, Badlands 2200 day pack

Badlands2200 Pack

JT came back with two external frame packs and then a Badlands 2200 day pack. I gotta tell ya. This is my next hunting pack. Life time warranty on all the seams. bladder hydro system, Padded back section so it rides easier. It has a zip open pouch from the back, so if you take you pack off and something i buried deep in the pack you don't have to dig through everything , you can open it from other side of the pack. It has exterior flaps that allow strapping on a rifle or a bow. The part that really impressed me. The blaze orange retractable flap for hauling your trophy out. On the bottom of the pack JT unzipped a bottom zipper and out pulled a blaze orange rectangle nylon type fabric with with 2 adjustable long straps. Setting the pack upright with the fabric laid out on the ground, we set the hind quarter and the cape on the fabric and then lifted and connected the adjustable straps to the top shoulder harness. A couple of quick tugs to tighten and the 1/4 and the cape was ready to pack out, solidly secured and with the blaze orange no doubt of some other hunter questioning he was seeing fur walking through the tree's and taking a shot.

For a simple day pack the 2200 maybe a little big, but not really. It will work for a week long trek into the back country or an afternoon of trailing a hit animal.

Now both of these items I found via Cabela's. The sharpener is a Cabela's private label. The Badland 2200 can be purchased from a number of different places. Both are under 200 dollars and both are well worth every dime in my humble opinion. These are two of the items I simply came across while hunting with a buddy and as I said before, both are going on my holiday wish list.

Now...share with us, the new gear you have come across :)

Edited by McBruce, 09 November 2009 - 11:00 AM.

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#2 Eric

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 06:52 PM

Well, for a few years now I have been in need of a new blaze orange huntin vest. PA a few years back got a new one at Cabelas and I said to him if you run across another one like that I could use one. So after his fall hunt this year out at my sisters he handed me a new vest a little early for my birthday. This one realy fits me well as I have trouble with clothes fitting across the shoulders.

I plann on wearing this vest into the ground as all the others. It sure is nice to have something new once in a while. Posted Image
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#3 Leo

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 07:28 PM

Drake EST Thermal Underwear

Mack's Prairie Wings sells the tops and bottoms. This is seriously good stuff. It really helps keep you warm. I don't hunt in the cold without it. Not really a new item for me I've been using this stuff for three years.

Drake Underwear

I'm currently rebuilding one of my rifles so I'll have some stuff to add once I'm done and I test it at the range.
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#4 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 08:53 PM

I recently bought a new toy. It is just a plain jane range finder, few if any bells and whistles. So far I have used it to range just about all yardages to over 400 yds. I am well pleased. What I find nice is when I set up anywhere I just range several trees, rocks and know how far everything is.

My variable speed Dremel tool bit the dust and I had to buy another. I use a Dremel for polishing gun parts, chain saw sharpening etc. If you use this tool for chain saws you will not use another saw sharpening tool, bar none. The dremel tool requires an attachment to sharpen chain saws but are only about $13 and well worth it.
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#5 McBruce

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:06 PM

For those wild game cooks out there, this is a must.

Jaccard's Meat Tenderizer

Jaccard

the best 39.98 you will ever spend. The Jaccard single or triple has one or three rows of 16 stainless steel knives which cut the fibers of the meat rather then pounding them to break. This will also cause marinades to soak deeper in , giving better flavor. A trick I learned years ago, was to tenderioze the meat with the Jaccard, then soak it in butter milk for 24/48 hours, then soak it for 24 in your marinade.

you can take what is normally tough cuts of meat and make them melt in your mouth.
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#6 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 11:05 PM

If you're inclined to stray off the beaten path on hunting excursions in late fall occassionally and do the camping/tenting thing, or maybe you like ice fishing in a portable ice shack, or maybe you've opted to use one of the new portable pop-up blinds or elevated enclosed tree houses come fall and winter and find a small heater would help you brave the temps and remain longer on stand, then the Mr. Heater Buddy might fit the bill.

Mr Heater Buddy

It's small enough to pack in with you and uses either 1 lb screw in propane cylinders or you can opt for an adaptor hose for use with a 20 or 30 lb propane tank where packing gear isn't a problem. There's two sizes. The Mr. Heater Buddy has two settings at 4000 and 9000 BTUs. The bigger unit, Mr. Heater Big Buddy, is slightly larger and has 3 settings at 4000, 9000 and 18,000 BTUs. From a safety perspective, they have a low oxygen sensor shut-off and a tip-over shut-off switch. I have the smaller unit and have used it for the past 5 years when I go moose hunting. We build our camp in the boonies at the end of a logging road dead end. Although it's not sauna temps, it sure takes the chill off a cold northern ontario fall night. My best friend usually borrows it in the winter and uses it in his ice shack.

I really like the safety features as I've heard of horror stories about campers or hunters dying from asphixciation from other space heaters in enclosed areas.

The smaller unit sells for under $100 and the larger unit is slightly more.

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#7 McBruce

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:07 AM

Geoff:One word of caution with the Mr Heater Buddies. Read the instructions and it will tell you not for elevations above 7,000 ft above sea level. I have actually contacted the company and asked if they have a model that will work above that elevation. They indicated they do not. The safety features which senses low oxygen levels is the same feature which makes them unreliable above the 7K ft level. If they light they may shut themselves off as they do not sense enough oxygen. Some units simply will not light.

If you are going to go hunting in the mountain and are going above 7K ft you may want to find alternative heat source. Anything under 7K ft, and they work extremely well. I'm still trying to figure out why stores up in the mountains carry them but they do :)
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#8 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 12:04 PM

When Bruce brought up the Badland packs I perked up. I own two now. I bought the Monster fanny pack for whitetail deer hunting.

Monster Badlands Pack

The reason is it carries a limited ton of stuff. I emphasis limited because if I carry a regular back pack I tend to throw in everything until I struggle putting it on. LOL Plus I often use a climber tree stand and carry that with shoulder straps leaving my hands free to cary my bow. The Monster can be set to ride lower on my backside so the tree stand does not interfere with it like it would a regular back pack. Plus I can draw my bow with it on and not have it get in the way like a back pack would. I proved that when I had it on when shot my whitetail a couple of weeks ago now. Badland Packs are very comfortable, a high quality pack and very well thought out.

Edited by McBruce, 10 November 2009 - 01:15 PM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#9 McBruce

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:34 PM


G5 Sportsmen Stick Sharpener

G5 Sharpener

This isn't a new product, but one most guys would / should carry in their packs. A few years back, Mark Fav. handed me this sharpener as a thanks for putting stuff together for our bear hunt. At the time he said, try it out and do a review on it sometime. Well it has taken longer then expected to write something up. This sharpener is always in my pack. ( just make sure you have your pack with you when you need to skin something )

The unit is fairly small in size, easy to use, simply draw the blade through the v notch and put an edge back on your knife in a matter of minutes. This unit also works great on broadheads.

For Large game/ elk, moose and such, and in situations where you are in the deep back country, it sure beats carrying a number of knifes. Cost in the 25.00 range, a great stocking stuffer during the holiday season.
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#10 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 05:32 PM

Ameristep Chair Blind

Being a little addicted to turkey hunting as if that were possible I have a couple of items that I find work very well. A couple of years ago I bought an Ameristep chair blind. It is a camp chair with a canopy. It does not suit for all hunting but works very well for some.

Cost 200.00

I also bought a tree brella. It is an umbrella that affixes to a tree and in bad weather you stay dry. It can also be used as a turkey blind by opening it and putting it infront of you. It is not heavy and works for both uses.

Edited by McBruce, 10 November 2009 - 07:17 PM.
add links and costs

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#11 McBruce

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 07:48 PM

Leica 1200 range finder
Leica Range Finder

I have owned a couple of Bushnell range finders and they have always done exactly what I needed them to do. Last week I had the opportunity to test out the Leica 1200 Range Finder.

The optics were amazingly bright, I really liked the red led read out when viewing ranges, the biggest advantage, was the 7x magnification. When using the Leica, I didn't need to carry my binoculars. We were scanning mountain sides 1 1/2 miles away and picking out hunters and wildlife with easy. ( not to be confused with the active range of the laser ) We did test ranges out to 900 yards, the product is stated to be able to range out to 1200.

Yes the price is higher then more commonly purchased range finders, but the quality and accuracy far out weigh the cost difference add to this, you are carring once less item ( your short range binoculars ), Take the cost of a good set of short range binoculars apply that to the cost of a more commonly pruchased range finder and you have now upgraded yourself to the Leica 1200, a top end range finder. The unit is easy to use, weather proof, crisp and clear. You won't be disappointed.

Cost was around 699.00 with it currently on sale for 599.00.

Edited by McBruce, 10 November 2009 - 07:49 PM.

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#12 Leo

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 07:53 PM

Talley Lightweight Scope rings Midway $41 Extremely tight tolerances and probably some of the very strongest rings on the market.

Bell and Carlson Medalist Stocks (Stocky's $205) Pachmeyer decelerator pad, full length aluminum bedding block and hand laid carbon fiber construction. Mine is tan with black spiderweb other options are available, including camo dipped.

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#13 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 08:33 PM

Bruce,

Good pick up on the Mr. Heater on high elevations. Being a flatlander all my life at elevations between 0 to no more than 700 feet (under 300 feet 99% of the time), I never gave that a thought. I did make it to Colorado for a bow hunt back in the 80s near Rifle and I do recall getting altitude sickness due to oxygen levels I was not climatized to. A feeling I hope I never experience again (not to say that I won't make it back to Colorado, just hope to pass on the ill feeling with a lack of oxygen Posted Image ).

Besides, don't all you Rocky Mountain men just kill a grizzly bear or 390 class bull elk when it gets cold and climb inside the carcass to keep warm? Posted Image

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#14 runNgun

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 12:01 AM

Buck Bombs

Buck Bomb


Last Saturday was opening day gun season in Minnesota and my cousin from California came home to hunt for the weekend. That friday night he stopped at Cabelas to get some slugs and a few other things, uncluding a couple Buck Bombs. He let me use one for the weekend and I can honestly say that I am a believer. Saturday morning I was sitting in my stand and saw a small 4 point downwind of me. I did 2 small sprays of the aerosol can and the wind carried it downwind, like it is supposed to. The scent that is carried will stick to leaves, branches, or anything else downwind. This can create a scent barrier between you and the downwind deer

Almost immedaitely, the buck picked its nose up when it caught the scent of the Doe in Estrus Buck Bomb and came trotting right in. I could have easily taken the shot but he was just too much fun to see walking around looking for the doe that wasn't actaully there.

With the buck bomb, you can either choose to spray it manually or lock the trigger down to release all of the spray at once. IMO, it's a lot easier to just spray the bomb ocasionally than hang a scent pad with a messy liquid from a branch, possibly leaving a larger scent trail that a deer could pick up on.

Cost around 10.00

Edited by McBruce, 11 November 2009 - 06:51 AM.
add cost to post.

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#15 Fossil

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 09:30 AM

I just bought a handy tool.................I used it and love it..............

Posted Image


Big game dressing tool makes removing a deer's anal alimentary canal in the field quick and easy. Just insert, turn twice, and pull out a 10'' section to cut off. The Butt Out® 2 works for deer, antelope, bear, hogs, and similar-sized big game.

2'' longer than the original, the Butt Out 2 makes it easier to maintain a firm grip on the handle during field dressing chores. The enhanced ''Butt Stop'' feature molded into the handle makes it easier to keep the Butt Out 2 inserted to the proper length when removing the animal’s alimentary canal.


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