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70 Grains Of 777 Enough?


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#1 old fart

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 03:17 PM

i had a post on here about trading my optima's for the cabela's timber ridge, well i traded and set up my scope with what i thought was 80 grains 777 and a 295 grain powerbelt. today the friend i traded with wanted to go shoot to get used to his gun, and when i loaded and fired my groups was high about 4 inches and the best group was 4-5 inches. when i set the scope the other day i had 1and 1/2 inch groups. i shot a little more but my shots were no better than 4 inches, i was thinking the scope, then my friend asked was i sure about the grain i used the other day. so i decided to drop down to 70 if that didn't work go to 90, but i was sure that i used 80. well i used 70 when i loaded and fired bullseye then a second shot about 1 inch to right but still in center circle. i thought about trying for 90 to see how they group but decided that if i can hit at 100 yds then i'm good to go. but after i got home i got to thinking is 70 grains of 777 enough for deer out to 150yds?, i have never used that small amout of powder. and i'm wondering why my gun won't shoot 80 good?,and if 90 would be better or worse? so have any of you all shot just 70 grain of 777 and if so is that enough to kill a deer cleanly? thanks for any help.

#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 05:57 PM

I think for those max distances 70 grains of loose 777 will do the job. Remember that 777 is 15% stronger than other powders so that puts you right in there at 70 grains. I also feel that powerbelts can be driven too hard and then tend to breakup rather than punch through. Although not the same as your contemplating I did shoot a doe at 83 paces using a powerbelt with only 60 grains of 2F Goex black powder. On that shot I had a complete pass through so felt it was adequate at that distance.
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#3 cayugad

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 11:44 PM

i had a post on here about trading my optima's for the cabela's timber ridge, well i traded and set up my scope with what i thought was 80 grains 777 and a 295 grain powerbelt. today the friend i traded with wanted to go shoot to get used to his gun, and when i loaded and fired my groups was high about 4 inches and the best group was 4-5 inches. when i set the scope the other day i had 1and 1/2 inch groups. i shot a little more but my shots were no better than 4 inches, i was thinking the scope, then my friend asked was i sure about the grain i used the other day. so i decided to drop down to 70 if that didn't work go to 90, but i was sure that i used 80. well i used 70 when i loaded and fired bullseye then a second shot about 1 inch to right but still in center circle. i thought about trying for 90 to see how they group but decided that if i can hit at 100 yds then i'm good to go. but after i got home i got to thinking is 70 grains of 777 enough for deer out to 150yds?, i have never used that small amout of powder. and i'm wondering why my gun won't shoot 80 good?,and if 90 would be better or worse? so have any of you all shot just 70 grain of 777 and if so is that enough to kill a deer cleanly? thanks for any help.


70 grains of 777 will do a couple things for you when shooting powerbelts. Like mentioned, you can push a powerbelt too fast and they start to act up. They splatter. When you slow them down you get maximum expansion out of them. Also you noted the accuracy of them with the lower powder charge. One thing you better prepare for is no pass through with that bullet. It will put a killing wound in the animal but you will not get a pass through in many cases. Also many people complain that they get poor blood trails. So after you shoot, be prepared to watch for a dropping deer, and listen for one that runs off in case it death thrashes. Or be a good tracker. This is what I have read.



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#4 Spirithawk

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 07:48 PM

Personally I'd give Thompson Center Shock Waves a try. Jason and I switched to them from Powerbelts and have had no regrets what so ever. They just seem to perform a whole lot better. Muzzleloaders are notoriously finicky though. Sometimes what shoots well in one won't shoot worth a darn in a diferant rifle. Even one of the same make, model and caliber. My motto has always been....don't be afraid to experiment. Often it can pay off big time. Everything Cayugad and Paul said about Powerbelts is 100% true too.

Edited by Spirithawk, 24 November 2009 - 07:49 PM.





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