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1858 Remington


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#1 Honky Cat

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 04:10 PM

After cleaning my new rifle, I thought it would be a good idea to check my cap and ball revolver. Sometimes it gets a little sticky after sitting too long, even if it's clean and oiled.

Everything was loose, but the hammer and cylinder would not lock. Sound familiar to anyone?

So, I took it apart and found the spring right above the trigger had one broken arm (the cylinder lock side) and the other side had a major crack where it was about to break.

There was no rust and the last time I cleaned it and put it back together there was no sign of fatigue.

So... How does a spring, not under pressure, just break?

Am I doing something wrong in cleaning or re-installing it? I have always completely disassembled for cleaning after every outing.
That spring never gets dirty but always gets cleaned and oiled.

I have reduced the mainspring tension as much as possible, so the whole system has a light feel. I also did a little filing on the trigger to smooth it out but for the most part, the gun is stock.

I know I can buy replacements, but don't want to continue having this problem. If any of you have had this problem and found a permanent fix, I would appreciate the how-to info.
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#2 Spirithawk

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 11:32 AM

While it's possible you made a mistake, when cleaning it and putting it back together, I doubt that caused your problem. The modifications might have though, but I really couldn't say. However, I do seem to remember that some replicas, a while back, had a problem with springs breaking. Just poorly made springs. I think CVA had such a problem, but a few others too. Many replicas, though stamped with differant manufacturers names, were, and still are, made in the same plants. Out of curiosity, what make is your 1858 Remington replica? You might could contact the company and ask if they had a problem with springs. If you replace it, and it happens again, I'd suspect your modifications.

Edited by Spirithawk, 18 January 2010 - 11:33 AM.


#3 Honky Cat

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 05:41 PM

It's a Pietta that I got through Traditions. I tried to flex the broken off arm just to find that I couldn't bend it with my fingers. I think the term "work-hardened" might apply. Hopefully the folks at Traditions will help me out, but I really don't want to put the same cheap part back in there. What I need to find is a person that's heavy into replica revolvers who has found a more permanent fix. I won' t mention the mods. I'm pretty certain they had no affect on the spring, but everybody's gonna want to blame that first. I know I would.
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#4 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 18 January 2010 - 06:18 PM

This sounds like something more than a paperclip fix if you know what I mean. I looked but could not find anything to help you out. Sure hope Traditions can do the job. Good luck.
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#5 Jeremiah

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 11:04 AM

I'm not saying that they don't exist, but this is a tall order. I have never been able to find any custom shops putting out higher grade replacements for Traditions firearms beyond the most basic parts. (Touch hole liners for flintlock rifles, nipples, sights... etc.) To be blunt, if you were to go to most gunsmiths, for example, and tell them just what you told us they might well tell you that if you were looking for quality you should not have purchased a Traditions. (Brutal, huh? I've played with a couple Traditions rifles with 1/66 twist barrels that could shoot out lights, but when you started looking at this part or that part and thinking "It could be better if..." there were no real aftermarket options available unless you were comfortable with finding something made for another gun that was "close" and then modifying.) Of course, as Norm has pointed out, it seems many replica pistols, or at least the parts, come out of only a handful of factories. So, what then? LOL

I dunno, bud. Likely not what you were hoping to hear. If it were me I might buy a replacement just to give it to someone who might be able to machine me one. (Dad once had to have a screw made for an old Stevens .410. "Cha-ching!" :doh2: :lol: )

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