Jump to content


Photo

Winchester Model 12


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 January 2010 - 09:28 PM

I loaned my youngest son a Winchester model 12 pump shotgun to shoot some clay birds. Saturday he brought it back and as we cleaned it he said that the action worked pretty stiff. I decided to do a disassembly and check the condition of the parts inside. I do not have a manual for the shotgun but figured it would not be too much different than my 1300 Win Pump. I actually got the barrel off and the trigger assembly out but cannot get the bolt out of its forward position. I have sat for a few hours looking online to see if I can download one but to no avail. Thanks to Spirithawk I have a Illustrated Parts Breakdown but no help in getting the bolt assembly out to clean it. I have never seen a trigger assembly and inside of the receiver so gummed up. It will take hours to get all the gunk out. Sure wished I had a parts cleaner to use. After I get as much gunk out as I can without complete disassembly of the trigger group I plan to hit it with brake and electric motor cleaner and liberal use of the air hose.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#2 Honky Cat

Honky Cat

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 128 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lucasville, OH
  • Interests:Church, Family, Friends. One and the same.

Posted 25 January 2010 - 10:59 AM

I hope I don't catch too much crap for admitting this on here. But, I have used a water pressure washer on my marlin model 60 then compressed air till it was dry. Oiled it up and was good as new. I would never try that on a finer firearm, but I figured it was acceptable for the marlin.
Don't pray for a light load. Pray for a strong back.

#3 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 January 2010 - 12:43 PM

I plan on cloth and brush cleaning to get most of the crud off and out. Infact I have gone that far and next plan on hitting it with brake and electric motor cleaner and then air hose it dry. I have never encountered such a cruddy mess. If I knew of someone that had a vehicle parts cleaner I would have taken it to them for cleaning. I know it is an old gun and most likely was never taken apart to be cleaned. I finally found disassembly instructions on the NRA website for the non takedown model and it helps a lot. Decided to let the bolt in though as it is a bit involved to remove it. The firing pin seems to work easily so I am letting the bolt in. I can clean behind the bolt and the bottom and right side of the bolt. I then plan on reassembling the gun and open the action and clean behind the bolt at the front of the receiver. That should do it. Once it is reoiled it ought to work better than a new one.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 25 January 2010 - 12:45 PM.

If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#4 Leo

Leo

    Hunting Resource

  • Administrators
  • 3,155 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina

Posted 25 January 2010 - 12:48 PM

I'd be extremely reluctant to use high pressure anything to clean a trigger assembly. Some trigger assemblies have springs and parts on them that will just let loose and fly away when hit with pressure. Then if you're lucky enough to find the part that flew off, it's often challenging to figure out how to reinstall it.

This is how I would do it. I recommend doing this in a very well ventilated area. Spray it down with gun scrubber (or brake cleaner) let it dry and drain on a paper towel. Repeat spray, dry and drain until the cleaner drains out clean on the paper towel. Set the assembly on a clean paper towel after every spraying. You will go through a pile of paper towels doing this but you won't pick up dirt you just sprayed off. After it's finally clean and dry, spray it down with a lube that dries like Breakfree CLP. Wet lubes in trigger assemblies attract dirt like magnets, I would definitely avoid wet lubes.

Edited by Leo, 25 January 2010 - 12:49 PM.

Posted Image

#5 REDGREEN

REDGREEN

    Hunting Resource

  • Moderators
  • 1,461 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Hunting, fishing,wood carving, waking up with a pulse

Posted 25 January 2010 - 02:20 PM

Leo has the solution for you. Just use the airbrake cleaner, and it will peel anything off there that shouldn't be there. Dries quickly, leaves no residue, and you will be good to go.

#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 January 2010 - 07:12 PM

Thanks guys I already did pretty much what was described but did use a little air pressure to blow dry the trigger assembly. I have been staring at this mechanism and everything is pinned in to there was little danger of flying apart. Besides I had it in my hand holding it so nothing moved when I used the air. It was amazing how much crud I got out of that poor trigger group and receiver even after using a solvent, tooth brush and elbow grease to clean out as much as I could reach. I did find out that the gun was made in 1916 and from the looks of the inside of the receiver it may have never been taken apart. I am quite surprised that everything is still tight and inspite of some shiny spots works like a charm.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users