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#1 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 12:53 PM

I typically hunt from treestands, still hunt or just pop myself behind a small tree or weeds. But this spring I'd like to try getting myself a ground blind and take on them turkeys. I've been browsing the net and talking to a few friends who use pop-up blinds and think I'd really like to get a Double Bull. The biggest draw backl to the Double Bull is the cost. They're on sale at Cabelas and Bass Pro in the US for $299, but then I have to pay tax, cdn to U$ exchange, shipping and handling, possibly brokerage fees or customs duty. It'll likely beat up the better part of $400 cdn once all is said and done. If I opted to buy one in Canada, I was told they are $500 cdn plus 13% taxes. OUCH! So if'n I choose the DB, then it'll be the US purchase route for sure.

What's everyone think about the Double Bulls, or do you use and recommend another brand or model?

Geoff / TBow
Every day you`re fortunate enough to wake up breathing, is cause for celebration!

#2 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 01:35 PM

Primos Double Bull or Double Bull gound blinds set the pace a couple of years back. Since then several other companies have tried hard to compete. For the money I'd have a second look around. I have seen a few other manufacturers that come in the same size as the DB are in and that's an important item. I own an older DB and one other blind ( I can't remember the name of it and it's sitting in the woods in S. Ohio right now) and I have had good success using both. I didn't get a shot but I didn't get busted either.
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For turkey you don't have to be to concerned how the blind looks on the outside, deer now that's another story. Even then you should heavily brush it in hiding the exterior. When Turkey hunting you can set a tent style blind up in a open field with nothing around you and that's the advantage of a blind. Hunting turkey use the blind less the screening in it so you can shoot freely out the window opening, gun or bow. You have to stay hidden in that blind or you'll get busted, black interior dictates black clothing all over, head and gloves, camo interior then follow with camo.Posted Image


Or take a day trip across the border to a cabelas, you're retired and have plenty of time for that little ride. Posted Image

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 01 March 2010 - 03:35 PM.

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#3 Micky

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 02:08 PM

I am a big fan of Double Bull blinds. We hunt out of them in deer and Spring turkey seasons. They stay in the field for 6-7 months out of the year and hold up very well.

#4 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 04:20 PM

Rowdy,
The closest of the chain super hunting stores to me is still a 200 mile drive one way. There's a Gander Mountain in Watertown, NY, but their cost on a DB is $400 US. Bass Pro is at Auburn, NY and their cost on a DB is $300 US, but I'd burn about $200 in gas getting there and back. The only store in Canada closest to me is Bass Pro north of Toronto, but again, it's a 225 mile drive one way and their cost is $500 cdn plus the $200 in gas I'd burn.

I can order from Cabelas or Bass Pro and have it shipped to Ogdensburg, NY, which is right on the border. I live right across the river from there and it's just a 10 minute drive one way. I usually ship items to a courrier drop off location there. It costs me $5 for a drop off.

So for me to get a DB and shipped stateside, the cheapest I can get it is:

Price $300 US
Tax 7% (?) $21 US
S&H $20 US
Courrier drop-off $5 US
Total $346 US / $367 cdn
Bridge fare to US and back $6 cdn
Customs (PST & GST) $41 cdn
TOTAL $414 cdn

If I drive to the Bass Pro in Auburn NY, which is the closest of the chain sporting stores that have the DBs on sale, I can save on the $20 S&H, but will pay $150 to $200 in gas, plus munchies and coffee for the day. That DB will cost just shy of $600 cdn by the time all the i's are dotted and the t's are cossed.

And it's only Bass Pro and Cabelas that have the DBs on for $300. Everywhere else is $400 plus.

Man I hope the bride desn't read this. I keep telling her that hunting is an economical way to put food on the table! Posted Image

Geoff / TBow
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#5 irinman2424

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 06:01 PM

I have been looking at the ones at gander mt they are 129 ~ and are the double bull style blind but in Gander Mt brand I think it would suit me fine
I believe in fillet and release!

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#6 Spirithawk

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 06:06 PM

What I have is one of the chair blinds. Paul bought one too. It takes a whopping 10 seconds to set up. Posted Image Just slide it out of the carrying bag, open the folding chair, sit down and pull the blind over you. You're out of the weather and it's so easy to set up and take down that you can be fairly mobile too. You have a large front window to shoot out of and smaller screened windows on the sides. The chair is very comfortable having armrests and even drink holders. The blind also has inside pouches for gear. Turkeys aren't like deer. They don't have to see something over a long period of time to get use to it being there. You can set a blind up and within seconds of being in it turkeys can show up. The cost of my Ameristep chair blind was only $69.00 and they even have two person models.

Edited by Spirithawk, 01 March 2010 - 06:08 PM.


#7 Honky Cat

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 07:45 PM

Living in Canada sounds expensive, eh? I guess that's the price to live in all that unspoiled beauty. The only thing I learned about blinds this year is that they cost about $10 to make no matter the size and the companies making them are ripping people off because they know you want it. I tend to rebel against that kinda greed even if it inconvienences me. If you are gonna leave it up in the same spot for a long time and spend the effort to brush it in, have you considered just making a natural blind? It sounds like less work to me and they're free! Just a thought. And, the uglier it is the more "natural" it'll look.
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#8 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 08:13 PM

One comment I did hear from some friends who use popup blinds, is that the less expensive units tend to last a year or two if used a lot. The DBs seem to have a reputation for lasting.

Anyone else experience that?

Geoff / TBow
Every day you`re fortunate enough to wake up breathing, is cause for celebration!

#9 Jeremiah

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 08:45 PM

I've had an Ameristep Brickhouse since they came out. (Going on 5 years now???) Set up side by side with a Double Bull T5 (not sure they even make that model anymore since Primos bought them out), the only difference to the untrained eye at first glance is in the fabric. The Double Bull fabric feels like it is about twice the thickness and it has no shine at all. The Ameristep has, not really a shine, but a sheen of sorts to the fabric in direct lighting.

In fairness, my Ameristep is never left in the woods. It is packed in and out for each hunt. I also only use it for spring gobbler season. (So, we're talking maybe a dozen hunts a year.) For what I do it fits the bill perfectly. If I hunted from a blind more, had the land to leave a blind out, or simply had ~$400 burning a hole in my pocket, I would certainly own a Double Bull blind.

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#10 Micky

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 08:55 PM

My brother is an outfitter and he uses well over a dozen Double Bulls. He leaves them out for 5-6 months at a time each deer season. Then he takes them up and sets them back out for Spring turkey season. They are very durable and will hold up for several years under normal use. The most trouble that Kenny has had is rods being broken. Ask Andrew (Steelrain202) about that. He shot one with an arrow on national tv. :archer:
They do not hold up well when bulls decide to try to stomp a mud hole in one. :blink:

#11 Spirithawk

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 08:58 PM

Another thought to consider might be a Gilley suit. Jason and I both wear one for turkey hunting and archery hunting. They don't hide movement like a blind but they do conceal you very well. We've taken an awful lot of both deer and turkeys with nothing more to hide us than our, as we call them, leaf suits. Posted Image

Edited by Spirithawk, 01 March 2010 - 09:00 PM.


#12 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 09:40 PM

As Norm said I too own a chair blind which weighs about 11 pounds. I once set it up in a fencerow and had two decoys out in front. I called several times and a hen showed up about 80 yards away and proceeded to prance toward the decoys only about 10 - 15 yds infront of my little blind. She came up to the hen decoy and attacked it with a vengence. I sat there silent as I thought if I made a sound I would be next on her list. She never paid me any attention at all. The chair blind is very comfortable it is actually a fold up camp chair with a canopy you can pull over your head. I also got mine for $69.00 at cabelas. I dont own a ground blind but my son-in-law does. His is one of those pop up blinds and I have used it on occasion. Last fall I even used it when I killed a mature doe. It sat right out in the open next to a fencerow and the deer did not seem to be very disturbed by it. I also used one that I set up that night and immediately hunted out of it. I actually set that one up in but at the edge of an unpicked corn field. I didn't have a deer approach from the front but one came up behind me in the corn field and stopped only about 3 or 4 yards away. She too eventually wandered off without alarm. Neither one of those blinds were doublebull but had been used for a number of years. My only problem was getting them folded up and back into the carry bag. It went something like 30 seconds to set up and 25 minutes to put back into the bag.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 01 March 2010 - 09:43 PM.

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#13 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 12:21 AM

I guess some of the blinds come with a video for setting up and packing up instructions. From what I've heard from others who have used them, watching the video is a MUST, but then that wouldn't be very manly! Posted Image

I dun' need no stinking instructions!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Well at least until all else fails! Posted Image

Geoff / TBow
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#14 irinman2424

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 10:22 AM

I use a ameristep outhouse that I leave in the woods from about 2 weeks prior to season through last day of season in doing so I have noticed that the sheen was dulled its still in great shape and has lasted me over 5 years the key is though to get some tent stakes and use instead of the wire ones that come with it as they pull out and allow the blind to sag and collapse when that happens moisture collects and they decay real fast mine has lasted me 5 years and is still in great shape a friend of mine used the wire stakes and his collapses all the time and the fabric has holes in it now from decay and flapping his looks about 15 years old and only has had it 3 years so just like anything else its all in how well you take care of it and set it up
I believe in fillet and release!

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#15 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 11:09 AM

I guess some of the blinds come with a video for setting up and packing up instructions. From what I've heard from others who have used them, watching the video is a MUST, but then that wouldn't be very manly! Posted Image

I dun' need no stinking instructions!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Well at least until all else fails! Posted Image

Geoff / TBow



You'll watch the video trust me and I'm a little mechanically inclined. I first thought I could take it out in the back yards and quickly throw it up. My neighbors had to be Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image seeing me get so frustrated. Went inside and watched the video and set it up no problem. Now my other big blind sets up easy and quickly too but it is a different procedure than the DB. I just remembered the name of my other blind Yukon Blinds.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."




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