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Easton Discontinues Arrow Sizes


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#1 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:25 AM

Wouldn't you know, Easton's been making 2419's for how many years? ... - ...30 or so? Anyway, I decide to standardize on the 2419 right from the easton chart on their website to cut cost of arrows - I can buy more than twice as many aluminum as i can carbon for the same price. I then bought two dozen 2419's off Ebay and they show up with the conical end for glue-on nocks. Yuk.

So I ordered two dozen Super UNI's from Lancasters and two dozen S-Nocks only to receive two dozen nocks and one dozen bushings. Some digging and it turns out Easton is discontinuing some sizes including the 2419! I look to other archery suppliers and have yet to find the Super UNI in stock for 2419.

Question #1 - is there a replacement that they DO make that fits the 2419 shaft? I've sent two e-mails to Eastons without response so far and all my e-mails to archery suppliers (incluting Lancasters) is - "I dunno".

Question #2 - what prompted discontinuing some alloy sizes? Are carbons taking over to that degree? Is there anyone left out there that still shoots aluminum to hunt? Are they simply standardizing on or migrating to their new sizes (300, 340, 400, etc.)? Perhaps cutting down the number of sizes they carry to maximize profits/minimize inventory?


"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#2 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:44 AM

Just thought of something...I believe the numbers are first two digits for OD and last two digits for wall thickness. If that's true then the ID is just the OD minus twice the wall thickness. If that's true then the ID of a 2419 is .204". Running the numbers, the nearest ID is the 2317 with an ID of .206", but that's too big. Next to that is the 2315 with an id of .200". It's too small, but would 4 thousanths of an inch make that big a difference? That's half the thickness of a super slinky E string.

Any thoughts for using the 2315 as a replacement?


"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#3 Leo

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 11:49 AM

First two digits are the diameter in 64ths. So the O.D. of a 2419 is 24/64" or .375"

Second two digits are the wall thickness in 0.001"'s so the wall thickness is 0.019"

The I.D. is 0.375-2*0.19=0.337"

Hope that helps.
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#4 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 12:17 PM

Thanks Leo - that does change the math quite a bit. The 2317 is still the closest one with an ID of .325 for a difference of 12 thousanths...the size of a heavy guage acoustic E string. I'm thinking that's enough to make it possible to be off center...enough to matter? I don't know.

Anyone have a clue what the diameter of those 300 & 340 bushings are?
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#5 Leo

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 12:37 PM

In my opinion you'll have more error trying to make an undersized bushing work than you would have if you stuck with the conical swagged ends.
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#6 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 12:43 PM

That's probably true Leo - I'm not comfortable with a 12 thousanths difference. I hate not being able to fine tune my nock.

I can't seem to find the specs on their 300 and/or 340.

Sheesh.
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#7 Straightedge

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 02:21 PM

Easton techs will give you an answer if you email them. Sometimes they are rather slow, but I have always found them to get back to you with answers. I go through the Easton site for email.

#8 Jeremiah

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 04:00 PM

Definitely contact Easton directly. (And, yes, expect at least a week before you hear anything.)

As for the arrows, in general, I don't know exactly what models you're shooting or where you are most commonly buying them, but I pay right around the same price for a dozen X7 Eclipse aluminum target shafts (or even XX78's) as I do for my ST Epic carbon hunting shafts. (80 to 90 dollar range.) I don't know anywhere that the savings of buying aluminum shafts over carbon is half price. (Unless, perhaps, the comparison is of something like a "low end" XX75 to a "premium" CX Maxima or, maybe like in your case, in an auction where the seller simply can't move the product... Don't think for a second that conical back end was just a minor oversight made on their part. :no: They knew they were unloading something most folks would not want.)

Personally, I still think there's a place for both materials. I still think aluminum shafts are more easily manufactured to straighter tolerances. (Especially at longer lengths which is important for guys like me shooting 30" hunting shafts and 34" long indoor target shafts.) I'm not sure I see myself shooting anything but alloy for indoor Vegas. But, carbon have proved themselves across the board to me for hunting and it seems like that is the case for most folks. So, yes, I would think cutting out some less popular selling shaft sizes may well be in Easton's best interest financially.

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#9 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 07:38 AM

I've been shooting Gold Tip X-Cutters for 3D and hunting for at least 8 years and they fly great, kill animals, and with the large OD help with my 3D score often enough to be very useful. They cost about $90 for a dozen.

Gamegetter 300 or XX75 2419's or 2317's are plenty straight and heavier. I can get any of those for about $35-$39/Dozen with a little shopping. It's more than the economics, though it's pretty significant, it's also weight. After hunting in Wyoming last year in some pretty stiff wind I'm coming to appreciate a heavy arrow even more. At least for hunting, I'm more likely to side with a heavy arrow with lots of twist (5" helical feathers) than anything else.

Last night I finally cut some of the new 2419's I have and put them on the scale (my arrows are also 30"). With an insert, 125g head, UNI and nock, that arrow will weigh in the 660g range. Back when I used to shoot a similar arrow my Switchback was hefting them at 245fps. By contrast my GT with a 100g head is in the range of 520g flying at about 255fps. I don't understand why there isn't more of a difference in speed, but if you run the KE numbers the heavier arrow wins. Couple that with heavier arrows maintaining KE down range better and it looks - at least to me - like the better hunting choice; more KE delivered down range with a more stable trajectory especially in high wind. AND they're cheaper. It's what we call in the biz a win-win.

The only fly in the ointment is finding another dozen UNI bushings for the other dozen 2419's I have, then changing it all again to fit into the Gamegetter 300's.


"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#10 Jeremiah

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Posted 07 May 2010 - 03:28 PM

No complaints here with a heavy arrow. I like them for hunting as well. (Mine generally run between 450 and 550 grains.) Don't think that means you need to shoot an aluminum though. There are tons of heavy carbon arrows on the market.

One thing I will say about your current choice is that you may want to keep an eye on your FOC (Front of Center). I doubt that at nearly 15 grains per inch in shaft weight that you will even be at 10%. (Generally, 10 to 15 percent is minimum recommended for hunting with the percent needing to move up as the game pursued gets larger.) I've found several things to be true in hunting arrows.

1) The smaller the outside diameter of the arrow, the less susceptible it is to wind drift.
2) The smaller the outside diameter of the arrow, the better the penetration. (All other things being equal.)
3) A higher FOC percentage allows for the fletching of an arrow to stabilize and steer it faster and more easily.
4) A Higher FOC keeps an arrow "moving straight" through an animal even when contact with bone occurs.

I would definitely recommend that you consider building an arrow with a lighter (and smaller diameter) shaft. Then, if you still want the same kind of weight, add a heavier point. You can even use an insert with a threaded back portion to add screw in weights or all-thread there to gain grains if you would rather not purchase heavier broadheads. (I'm really like the 10 grains per inch Epic N-Fused .300's with 125 grain tip I've been shooting. Small diameter, ~500 grains total, with ~13% F.O.C.) I know you would be pleased with the results. ;)

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#11 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 12:02 PM

That's a good tip Jer - hadn't even thought about FOC until you mentioned it.

I did get a chance to shoot some this weekend, in the wind, and they really fly good. Even in a stiff cross wind, at 20 yards, they're nailing center no problem. I'll check FOC on them tonight and see what it is. The FOC is - if I understand correctly - the percentage difference from geometric center to center of gravity. The geometric center is from the throat of the nock to the tip of the broadhead, correct?

My earlier weight estimates were on uncut shafts. The actual weight of these arrows completely finished is 614 gns. I weighed my GT shafts woth 100g tips and they are 425g. This is a SIGNIFICANT increase in weight.

I also noticed that I can't shoot the top dots on my small target now - these arrows knock the target over! LOL.

The Gamegetter 300's and 2317's are basically the same shaft - that's a slightly lighter shaft and slightly more narrow. Probably a better fit FOC too.
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#12 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 07:06 PM

Check my math Jer:

My old arrow is 30 1/8 from tip to nock throat. Therefore half the arrow length - geometric center is at 15 1/16. Perfect balance is at 11.5 inches from front therefore FOC is 23.7% forward of center as calculated by:

100 - 100(11.5/15 1/16) = 23.7% , This arrow weighs 429grns


The new arrow:

100 - 100(12.25/15 3/16) = 19.3% , This arrow weighs 614 grns


From what you said those numbers sound high - is FOC calculated with the full length? If so, then my FOC is half that percentage.
"The Lord bless and keep you. The Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. The Lord turn His face toward you and give you peace." Num 6:24-26

#13 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 08:29 AM

FOC calculator

Basics to figuring FOC
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#14 Hatchet Jack

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 08:30 AM

Well I must be doing it wrong. I looked at the GT calculation page for FOC, plugged in my info and it cranked out 9.95%, recommends 8-12%. So if that's right and I really should be at least 10, then I'm barely there.

I suppose I could bump up to 145/150g heads...or go ahead and transition to 2317's. These are flying really good though. However, I haven't shot them long distances yet.
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#15 Jeremiah

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 03:05 PM

http://www.goldtip.c...ulators/foc.asp

But, yeah, yours came out to nine point something in OnTarget-SFA as well.

I still say get slightly lighter shafts. ~10 grains per inch. :P

Seriously though, good broadheads over 125 grains are harder and harder to find these days. I'd recommend Magnus as I know they have some good ones. (Love their stuff anyway... I've wrecked two Magnus Bullheads on trees and if you send them in to them they send you a new one, no questions. All Magnus heads are lifetime guarantee.)

Outside of that, check into PDP inserts for the arrows. They have a threaded back end that allows you to add weights or even 8/32 All-Thread. The will allow you to add the weight you seek to the insert itself so that you can keep shooting your existing broadheads. (Oh yes, I'm frugal like that. :lol: )

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