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Arrows Choice Questions


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#1 Spirithawk

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 03:11 PM

I'm about to ask what's probably a dumb question or two but oh well....not the first time nor the last.Posted Image With my old crossbow I was limited to aluminum arrows. It takes a specific kind with actual nocks like regular arrows. Now that I have my new Horton I see that they offer both aluminum and carbon arrows, bolts, which ever you care to call them. Soooo, here's my questions. First, what is the advantages and disadvantages of both types? My old Jennings slings the aluminum ones so hard that after a few shots, even in bow targets, the shafts start to warp. My Horton is 175lb draw compared to the Jennings 150 lb so it slings them even harder. In my mind the carbon arrows would be the better choice since they shouldn't warp, or would they? Also, if I go with the carbon, which I'm sure I will because for one they are much easier to find, is there any particular care that might extend their life? I'm kinda excited about finally being able to shoot carbons. Ok all of you very wise archers on here, any thoughts or advice? Please fill me in on anything you think I might should know to about carbon shafts.

Edited by Spirithawk, 15 May 2010 - 03:14 PM.


#2 Jeremiah

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 07:00 PM

Carbon for sure. I've set dad up with both Carbon Express and Gold Tip carbon bolts. They both weigh within a few grains of the aluminum bolts he had been shooting. So, expect similar stored energy upon impact and velocity. Of course, unless you use them for shish-kabob skewers on the grill, carbons are pretty much either going to be as straight as the day you bought them or broken. As far as care goes, flex them before each shot. Listen for cracking or grinding sound and observe the surface as these will be the tell-tale signs of cracks. If you ever find anything, discard the bolt. (Note: Flexing bolts to test is tougher than flexing typical compound bow arrows because of their short length and, generally, thicker walls.)

One last thing... I have dad keep one "junk" aluminum bolt in his quiver for the purpose of shooting into the ground to "unload" his bow. A carbon bolt would probably withstand this better. However, the issue is that these bolts sometimes run into rocks or roots under the surface and get trashed. Carbons are just a little expensive for that purpose. But, if they run around the same price in your area then it's your call.

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#3 Spirithawk

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 07:11 PM

Thanks Jerimiah.Posted Image I can get the Carbon Exspress at True Value Hardware for $4.50 apiece. I've taken to firing into the ground with a junk arrow to " unload ". I'll take your advice and find me an aluminum one for that. I've got an arrow stuck in a tree root where I hunt. The root was under the dirt out of sight. The arrow won't budge and is there for the duration!Posted Image

#4 Jeremiah

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 08:18 PM

:lol: Sounds like my one buddy's hunting spots. He pinned a squirrel to a tree once while deer hunting only to realize he was 20' off the ground in his stand and the squirrel was at the same height in the other tree. It was on his own property and, well, I guess he's lazy. So, to this day there is an arrow in one of his trees with a squirrel skeleton dangling from it. :doh2: :)

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#5 Spirithawk

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 02:14 PM

You know? You have to wonder what people that stumble accross such arrows think.Posted Image Another arrow question. Lighter arrows fly faster but heavier arrows hit harder, correct? Soooo, to me it seems you'd want an arrow somewhere in the middle. With my old bow I always shot Easton XX75 2219's. They are basicly a normal arrow cut down to crossbow length. Do you have much to choose from with the type that Horton shoots or are they all mostly all the same? I was surprised that Horton even had aluminum ones. I'd always just seen the carbon shafts. Also, how does the weight of a carbon compare with that of an aluminum of the same diamiter? Sorry, just thoughts bouncing around in my empty head!Posted Image




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