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Losing Primer Caps On 1858 Pietta


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#1 Slayvid

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 03:06 PM

I have an Italian made replica of an 1858 army revolver and I have the hardest time keeping ignition caps on the cylinders. I use an inline capper to apply the caps to the nipple and press them down as tight as I can afterwards and then at least half of them fall off before I can fire them. I am using CCI caps. Any tips or suggestions?

#2 mzlloader

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 07:57 AM

A small pinch is all it takes


slightly squeez(not to much) the end before putting cap on nipple,


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#3 Slayvid

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 03:13 PM

A small pinch is all it takes


slightly squeez(not to much) the end before putting cap on nipple,


R L



Thanks, I give that a stab. Maybe I'll do better in future duels!

#4 Honky Cat

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 07:48 AM

You probably got #11 caps. They're the most popular ones available. You need to find #10 caps. I know of only one place in a fifty mile radius of where I live that sells them, so call ahead before you waste time and gas driving from store to store. It is very important that the caps fit right. From what I've been told, a chain fire is more likely to happen when fire from one cap gets under another loose cap than getting past the ball.


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#5 Jeremiah

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 11:34 AM

I've seen Remington #10 Percussion Caps at Gander Mountain & Cabela's.
Cabela's sells #10 & #11 online.
http://www.cabelas.c...79210239a.shtml
But, there will be a $20 "hazardous materials" fee assessed to the shipping cost.

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#6 Slayvid

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 05:09 PM

You probably got #11 caps. They're the most popular ones available. You need to find #10 caps. I know of only one place in a fifty mile radius of where I live that sells them, so call ahead before you waste time and gas driving from store to store. It is very important that the caps fit right. From what I've been told, a chain fire is more likely to happen when fire from one cap gets under another loose cap than getting past the ball.




#7 Slayvid

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 05:12 PM

Thanks to all for the advice, I think much of my problem is the number 11 caps which was all I could find when I bought my initial supplies. I have since found local suppliers for my new smoke pole and I will try the #10's and the pinch method although I have some concerns about pre-mature ignition from deforming the cap. Think I will try a few on empty cylinders first. Thanks again!

#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 12 July 2010 - 08:54 PM

Slayvid you may not need to pinch the #10 caps as you would the #11s. Try the #10s for fit just as they come without pinching them first. The #10 cap I believe is just a tad smaller around and should fit the pistol nipples just fine. If that does not work for you you might try to put a rifle nipple on one of your cylinders to see if it fits then you could use the #11 caps. I have not played with a muzzleloader revolver but have read about them.
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#9 cayugad

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 02:46 PM

I have the same revolver I think. Mine is a L. L. Pietta from Cabela's. And they are right, the revolver comes with #10 nipples. You try and put a #11 on them they fall off, jam the cylinder, just a mess. Someone told me they do make nipples that fit these revolvers and the #11. If I ever shoot mine enough to damage the nipples I will change over to them. Although I am lucky.. there is a store close to me that carries #10 caps.

A few tricks for that revolver to make shooting a pleasure. Use .451 ball if it is a Pietta. If it is a Uberte then you have to use .454 ball. 20 grains of 3f powder is plenty of powder. 35 grains is a max load. I shoot 3f in Jim Shockey Gold powder. Another good powder is 3f Pinnacle or 3f in American Pioneer Powder. The reason for those powders... they are a clean burning powder. If you shoot Pyrodex P or Goex 3f, the powder will work fine. BUT you will be taking the revolver apart about every three cylinders shot, and scrubbing out the inside frame, the ball loading plunger and especially the cylinder locking pin area. If not it will get near impossible to pull back in the cylinder release knob. If you shoot the other three, a simple wipe of the inside frame and a Q tip to the nipples once in a while and you can shoot all day. I shot over 60 rounds one after noon.

20 grains of powder does not sound like a lot, but consider this... your not hunting anything so large powder charges are not necessary. 20 grains is very accurate. Saves powder, keeps the revolver cleaner, etc. I like to load the powder, then a wad, then a ball. This makes a very good shooting revolver. If you have no wads, dump your powder, then a little cornmeal. Play with the cornmeal... you want the ball to seat just under the lip of the cylinder face. Make sure there is no so much cornmeal that it sits above the face or the cylinder will not turn.

If you want easy loading, get a loading platform. You drop the cylinder, put it on the loading stake, dump your powder, wad, or cornmeal, then set your ball there. Turn it over, cap it, then I STILL GREASE THE CYLINDERS. Some will tell you with the wad or cornmeal you do not have to grease the cylinder. Well that is fine. But I once had a chain fire and it will not happen to me again. I grease the cylinders.

Cleaning with the first powders mentioned... take the wooden grips off. Make up a good dishwater bath, and start scrubbing. The powder fouling will come right off. A good brush and you can scrub the cylinders and bore of the barrel at the same time. Take it out, set it outside, and rinse all the soap off with boiling hot water. Shake dry or get an air compressor and blow the parts dry. Lightly oil the trigger parts, then oil the rest of the revolver as normal. Put the grips back on and your all down. Also I take Q tips and clean inside the hammer housing, where it meets the cylinder, on the revolver frame. I want that nice and clean and then oiled as that is where these things tend to rust.
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