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Did Something Like A Rookie


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#1 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 11:20 AM

I had one of my bows repaired (major repair under warranty). Mathews Factory did an excellent job and exceeded my expectations an how they stood behind the warranty and their bow. And the retailer did an excellent job as well with all that they did to get my satisfaction and future patronage.

Anyway with all that said I picked up my bow yesterday and literally had to start from zero with it getting it tuned after the shop did their thing paper tuning it. It's 60/70 pound bow and I like it at 70# but this bow will go higher if you bottom out the limbs by 3#. 70# does feel over bowed or over poundage for me with this bow. The arrows setup works fine at that poundage as well. At first it felt a bit difficult pulling it back the first few times when we paper tuned it but I was not overwhelmed and my form was okay. I thought it was me just not getting my back into it at first. The limb bolts showed a small gap so I assumed the poundage was backed off around where I had it set. Oh I was wrong. I failed to ask the tech to check too. My shoulders and back are telling on me now and feel it the day after. I checked after I shot it maybe 75 times last night trying to get my sights and rest set doing a walk back style tuning. I got to thinking afterwards to measure the centering off the arrow on the rest at full draw. It then occurred to me to check the poundage. It did and didn't surprise me but it was at 73# and limbs were not bottomed out. Like I said that's a rookie mistake on my part - I know better to check the poundage. That's how folks can injure themselves by not checking the poundage and pulling a bow that is over their capability. Most of the time you would not think 3# is enough to injure someone. A shoulder hit that many times repeatedly will cause problems if not supported properly with muscle. If I injured it now that would stop me from enjoying the coming bowhunting season and I then would be kicking myself for doing something so Rookie.

Don't do a rookie thing like I just did.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#2 Leo

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 05:11 PM

I did a similar thing a couple years ago. I used a bow press and put a new string on. It was supposed to be an exact match so I didn't think about the poundage changing.

After I timed the cams I noticed the bow was shooting much faster than I remembered. The bow was a 70-80lb model. I figured the bow must have gotten a little heavier after all my string twisting to time the cams. I actually had it set at 70lbs before I changed the strings. I didn't touch the limb bolts, I just used the press. I was stunned after I finally checked the draw weight to discover it was now set at 79 lbs! Apparently the new bow string was just a little bit longer. I turned the bow down not because I can't pull that much but because my arrows were too close to the minimum weight for that poundage.

Lesson learned there check the draw weight even if all you are changing is the string.
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#3 TerryfromAR

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Posted 09 September 2010 - 05:17 PM

Rowdy, so the repairs upped the poundage? Did they replace the string, cable, limbs or cam? Those are the main 4 things that I could see creating this issue if they were replaced. It's hard to imagine 3 lbs would cause that much more difficulty with drawing a bow but I couldn't believe how much trouble I had drawing mine last year without changing a thing. My muscle strength was just less than what it previously had been. That issue is solved this year though. I shot 4 hrs with a buddy the other day, and towards the end while I was at full draw one of his sons decided to try to run infront of me (his daddy tore into him about it too) and I had to hold my bow and let it down, and it was much easier to hold and let down this year than last, and NOTHING has changed in the past 2 years. Be safe bubba.
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#4 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 07:42 AM

Rowdy, so the repairs upped the poundage? Did they replace the string, cable, limbs or cam? Those are the main 4 things that I could see creating this issue if they were replaced. It's hard to imagine 3 lbs would cause that much more difficulty with drawing a bow but I couldn't believe how much trouble I had drawing mine last year without changing a thing. My muscle strength was just less than what it previously had been. That issue is solved this year though. I shot 4 hrs with a buddy the other day, and towards the end while I was at full draw one of his sons decided to try to run infront of me (his daddy tore into him about it too) and I had to hold my bow and let it down, and it was much easier to hold and let down this year than last, and NOTHING has changed in the past 2 years. Be safe bubba.



Terry the bow had a new riser, limbs and axles. The string, cables assembly and cams were the originals but the cams were set up differently. A 60/70 pound bow can be setup to draw more weight than the top amount and I was looking at the gap between the limbs and the riser thinking it was backed off and assumed it was down near 70#. This bow, and I need to do this, could be a 75# bow with the limbs bottomed out and that's an unusual amount of extra draw weight over the top 70 pounds.
My ability to draw that much weight was not a surprise to me but I could have done some physical damage to myself. Sometime back when I first got back into hunting and shooting a bow I did some shoulder damage that caused me to stop shooting for a couple months. That's were my expression of pulling a rookie mistake runs in the door.
I was a bit sore but no worse for the wear. And I had no problems with my continued tuning and shooting last night. And you are right stay safe is my main reason for posting it.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#5 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 07:57 AM

I did a similar thing a couple years ago. I used a bow press and put a new string on. It was supposed to be an exact match so I didn't think about the poundage changing.

After I timed the cams I noticed the bow was shooting much faster than I remembered. The bow was a 70-80lb model. I figured the bow must have gotten a little heavier after all my string twisting to time the cams. I actually had it set at 70lbs before I changed the strings. I didn't touch the limb bolts, I just used the press. I was stunned after I finally checked the draw weight to discover it was now set at 79 lbs! Apparently the new bow string was just a little bit longer. I turned the bow down not because I can't pull that much but because my arrows were too close to the minimum weight for that poundage.

Lesson learned there check the draw weight even if all you are changing is the string.



Leo that's a huge jump in poundage. I kepted having an issue of loosing poundage with this bow before but it would appear now I have gained it all back and then some. A couple of added pounds in drawing a bow back would seem to be a minor change but it has been for me over the years a major one. It might be partially a mental thingy knowing I have upped the poundage. On the other hand my muscle memory does lie. LOL Being over bowed makes for some shaky shooting and huge groups cause the target won't stand still. LOL
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#6 Leo

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 11:23 AM

Leo that's a huge jump in poundage. I kepted having an issue of loosing poundage with this bow before but it would appear now I have gained it all back and then some. A couple of added pounds in drawing a bow back would seem to be a minor change but it has been for me over the years a major one. It might be partially a mental thingy knowing I have upped the poundage. On the other hand my muscle memory does lie. LOL Being over bowed makes for some shaky shooting and huge groups cause the target won't stand still. LOL


Yep it's huge. Way way more than I expected. The problem was the strings and cables weren't as exact a match as I thought they were. A little difference there can make a big difference in poundage.
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