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Africa Q&a


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#16 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 03:31 PM

Leo is there a season or better time to go? And is there a cheaper time to go there during the season?
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#17 Leo

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Posted 23 September 2010 - 08:55 PM

It's best to hunt during the cooler months of May thru August. Things happen that affect plane ticket prices. Your best bet is to use a travel agent that specializes in African travel. I've used the same one twice. She beats what I can find on my own every time.
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#18 runNgun

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 09:34 AM

What's a typical hunting day like Leo?
-Eric

#19 Leo

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 06:37 PM

Ok run,

Here is what happens before you even start hunting.

Get up at 5:30am put on my hunting clothes and walk to the campfire. Get a cup of coffee while soaking up some campfire smoke. Go into the dinning room and have nice breakfast (multiple choices). Go out shoot about four shots with broadheads into the target at the range. Get in the truck for the ten minute ride to the blind.
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#20 runNgun

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Posted 24 September 2010 - 10:09 PM

Ok run,

Here is what happens before you even start hunting.

Get up at 5:30am put on my hunting clothes and walk to the campfire. Get a cup of coffee while soaking up some campfire smoke. Go into the dinning room and have nice breakfast (multiple choices). Go out shoot about four shots with broadheads into the target at the range. Get in the truck for the ten minute ride to the blind.



So is scent control is not that much of an issue hunting in Africa?

How many hours do you typically sit on stand? Is is a lot like deer hunting, where you might sit only 3-4 hours at a time, and then head back to camp before going out in the evening?
-Eric

#21 Leo

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 02:35 PM

Scent control in Africa is important for bowhunting. Honestly, the smoke is a great cover scent. I was getting in the smoke on purpose. It's a good thing to do.

Usually you plan to sit all day long in a blind and eat lunch in the blind. Trust me, the activity level around these blinds isn't boring. There is almost always something going on.

Even after you get something, after the trackers and everyone leaves you might go back in the same blind and be successful again! You are not through hunting for the day just because you get something in Africa.
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#22 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 10:14 AM

What do you do for when nature calls in your hunting blind? I know from experience what I had to do when I sat all day in a blind out in Colorado and I imagine that you have to relieve yourself sometime right. Do they provide some sort of portable john on the spot :stir: :whistle:
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#23 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 10:16 AM

Leo since you took a few practice shots every morning what was the distances you shot from to the target? And what is the average distance most of the shots taken to kill your trophy?
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#24 Leo

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 07:03 PM

What do you do for when nature calls in your hunting blind? I know from experience what I had to do when I sat all day in a blind out in Colorado and I imagine that you have to relieve yourself sometime right. Do they provide some sort of portable john on the spot :stir: :whistle:


Self explanatory.

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#25 Leo

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 07:06 PM

Leo since you took a few practice shots every morning what was the distances you shot from to the target? And what is the average distance most of the shots taken to kill your trophy?


I practiced at 20 and 30 yards. Average shot distance was 20 yards. The Nyala was the furthest shot at 24 yards.
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#26 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 08:01 AM

I practiced at 20 and 30 yards. Average shot distance was 20 yards. The Nyala was the furthest shot at 24 yards.



Not to put the your shooting down but at that distance most everyone with practice can be proficient and deadly. To me that's a sign of a very good outfitter that understands how to set up the hunt for a good bow hunting situation. Plus at those distances the hunter has to be dead quiet too.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#27 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 08:04 AM

Self explanatory.

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Yepper that's the ticket. :rofl: It's a bit different being confined in a blind than hunting out of tree stand EH.:shifty: :blush:

Edited by Rowdy Yates, 29 September 2010 - 08:05 AM.

"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#28 Leo

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Posted 29 September 2010 - 09:13 AM

Not to put the your shooting down but at that distance most everyone with practice can be proficient and deadly. To me that's a sign of a very good outfitter that understands how to set up the hunt for a good bow hunting situation. Plus at those distances the hunter has to be dead quiet too.


I had practiced mostly at 30 yards and out to as far a 60 in tuning exercise. The point of the practice arrows isn't to keep me sharp. Its purpose is to make sure nothing has changed on the bow.

You are right in observing the set ups are top notch and well thought out. You will end up with very good opportunities. But you have to be quiet! You also need to minimize movement, even in the blind. So if you have to "skyjack" your bow to pull it back then turn down the poundage. Skyjacking can cause you problems even in a large well constructed blind with game animals very close by. I also strongly advise practicing drawing your bow as slowly as possible and letting it down as slowly as possible. You can then safely switch shooting windows if you need to. Being able to do all three of those things is more effective than a couple extra pounds of draw weight.
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#29 Rowdy Yates

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 08:50 AM

OK let's talk money - I know it's a sore topic but it's a part of any out of State or out of country hunt. Leo can you please break it down from the flight expense to the outfitter's package cost and then the taxidermy bill per animal. If I were to plan this trip I would have to have so much up front then the other costs come after the hunt is over. Or is it better to have it all in a budgeted hunt so you don't exceed your budget? You've been through this twice so you have a better understanding than most as to what to expect.

I will say this when I have looked into this safari that for the cost you get treated royally from everything I've read. And you get into some beautiful African animal encounters and trophies. That your dollar here in the States would never achieve the amount of bang (twang) for the buck (excuse the pone please LOL). For instance, one outfitter moose hunt could run you more than half of this trip with no moose to show for the trip. Or closer to home go on a Pronghorn hunt out west that might go half the cost of an African hunt package for several animals and get rained out like I did, and that's hunting.
"Keep the sun forever at your back, the wind forever in your face, and may forever God bless you out there on the trail."

#30 Leo

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:38 AM

Well first off the plane fare is legitimately a moving target. It's absolutely best to use a travel agent specialized in booking flights to Africa. In my experience using travel sites to book the flight to Africa costs you big money. I priced my flights to Africa both times this way and both times the travel agent netted me significant savings. I have saved big time in the past booking domestic flights using travel sites but not so with flights to Johannesburg.

The other advantage of using the agent is they can also get you travel insurance (which you need!!!)

A reasonable flight cost is around $2000 and the insurance package will be around $150-$200.

You do need a valid passport to book a flight. I highly recommend using a credit card to buy the tickets and insurance. Getting a credit card on file with the travel agent helps them if suddenly things must change.

The outfitter will deal with cash only. They typically require a deposit of half the daily fees in a wire transfer to book the trip. Eight to ten days is a good idea in case on some days the weather is bad for hunting. Depending on the number of days you book and the daily fee rate you are looking at $1500 to $2000 for a deposit.

I'm gonna stop here for now in case there are questions.
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