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#1 woodhick

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 04:42 PM

I just bought a Winchester X-150 50 cal in line muzzleloader privately and I need some help. I have used a flintlock for a while but this is all new to me in the inline. I want to take the bolt out, how do I remove it. What is best to shoot pyrodex or black powder and how much of each? What type of bullet do you suggest, and last but not least what about cleaning what do you use and what is the best way. Thanks for the help in advance.:boone:

#2 TerryfromAR

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 06:48 PM

From a review of the rifle i found "Use a maximum of 100 grains of volumetric Pyrodex or Triple 7 loose powder, or no more than 100 grains of pellet equivalents, and use 250 grain or lighter bullets if possible. If the need is there for a 300 grain bullet in a BPI product, it is prudent to drop your powder charge by at least 10%."

As far as the bolt removal, All I can find is that it's a quick release which would point to a button like on alot of bolt action rifles. Have you looked around the trigger housing for a "button" to push? that would be my guess...

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#3 TerryfromAR

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 06:55 PM

But woodhick from personal experience..... I would definitely say stay under 100gr I personally like 777 alot of people don't. I use 209 primers, My bullet choice is typically a saboted bullet, what I have now actually has a teflon tip on it the best thing is to try a few different combinations and see what groups the best for you in your gun, I normally just use the nitro solvent to dissolve the crud out of mine and then swab the barrel with a lightly damp patch with Hoppe's 9 oil on it. I normally break the breach plug and nipple apart and let them soak in a small cup of nitro solvent while I swab the barrel, and it helps alot....
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#4 Jerry Winland

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 08:24 PM

I have the T/C pro hunter with stainless 50cal barrell...I use 2 triple 7 pellets (100gr) of powder and t/c 200gr shockwave sabots....shoots great and have 16quarts of meat to prove it...lol
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#5 Phil

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 05:36 PM

Start with 80grains pyrodex & a 300 grain Hornady sabot bullet .......and I doubt you'll ever find need to improve the load.;)
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#6 cayugad

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 09:47 AM

I just bought a Winchester X-150 50 cal in line muzzleloader privately and I need some help. I have used a flintlock for a while but this is all new to me in the inline. I want to take the bolt out, how do I remove it. What is best to shoot pyrodex or black powder and how much of each? What type of bullet do you suggest, and last but not least what about cleaning what do you use and what is the best way. Thanks for the help in advance.



I have no idea how to remove the bolt. I would contact CVA and ask them which manual covers the breaking down of the rifle. In that manual there is a lot of valuable information like load suggestions, powders, etc. I know your thinking CVA? This is a Winchester. Well CVA imported them under the Winchester name as I understand it. So it is called a Winchester but in reality its a CVA. For instance, I have a Remington Genesis. Pretty impressive right... a Remington? Well the manual and all the parts are from a Traditions Yukon. Granted there are slight differences between the two rifles, but the manual will cover all the basics you need to know to break it down and shoot the rifle in a safe and effective manner. There is a CVA model rifle identical to the X-150 but for the life of me I can not think of the name of it. Also if I remember right, there was a Winchester X-150 and a X-150 magnum. Big difference as to what you want to load. One shoots 100 grains of powder and one will handle 150 grains of powder... IN PELLET FORM.

Now the real truth. While there are a lot of rifles that claim to be magnum rifles, not many of them shoot well or at least their best with magnum loads. So lets not get powder crazy. Further, we hunted for years with 60-100 grains of powder and killed everything on the North American continent. All to often we see people loading 150 grains of powder and then can't shoot good groups. Well some projectiles are more accurate and perform better with lower powder charges. So lets forget the magnum frame of mind and stick with what shoots best.

If you want to use Triple Seven 2f powder then start your load testing at 70 grains and work up from there. I personally would not go over 100 grains of powder. I will guess it will shoot best with around 90 grains of powder. As for the projectile... lots of choices out there. The Hornady XTP is hard to beat. In a 250 or 300 grain bullet they are normally very accurate. My CVA rifle does shoot Shockwaves very well.

If I were starting out and had to pick a powder, it would be Pyrodex RS which is a 2f grade powder. I would load 80 grain of it and a 300 grain Hornady XTP and then shoot. I think you might be surprised at how well it groups. Powerbelts are another option. Since this is a CVA rifle, normally they shoot powerbelts real well. I would use the 295 or try the 245 grain. The lighter being more flat shooting. Powerbelts do not need to be pushed hard to make them work well. 70 grains is a good starting point. If all your shots are under 100 yards you will be just fine.

Be sure to swab the bore of the rifle between shots. Your shooting a 209 primer so ignition problems should be null. It is important to get consistency with a right. Consistency comes from making every shot the same as the one before. For instance, the amount of powder, the seating pressure on the projectile and last the condition of the bore. If you shoot and do not swab, the condition of the bore has changed. The bore would be more fouled then the prior shot. So you have changed the consistency. Swabbing the bore will not be a 100% cure for bore consistency, but it will get you closer to being there, and will help in the ease of loading the next shot. Muzzleloaders are not known for quick follow up shots. So we have to make all our shots count, and that is done through consistency.

When you swab the bore, to avoid problems be sure of a couple things... the patch is the right size, you have a loading jag that will hold on to the patch, and you never swab with a dry patch until the fouling has been removed. Some good swab solutions, spit, Windex, isopropyl alcohol, water, and other black powder solvents. I use a mix of alcohol and windshield washer fluid or a Dollar Store bottle of Windex. Sometimes I use Rusty Duck. It all depends on my mood. Lightly moisten the patch. To much liquid can cause, hang fires and misfires. The idea is not to clean the rifle, but just to remove the fouling out of the bore. So with a damp patch start to work that SLOWLY down the bore in three inch segments. Feel that patch as it cleans. You do not ever jam that patch into a tight area. Work that slowly into it and back up until you feel that patch hit the breech plug. Then bring that patch up, turn it over, and swab again. After that you can run a dry patch down there to remove any moisture. Now you have consistency when you load. And consistency = better accuracy.

You will get a lot of opinions on what shoots best our of your rifle. All fine and good. A 250 grain XTP is normally accurate. 80 grains of powder is plenty for any whitetail deer. But test a lot of bullets with different powders. Let your rifle tell you what is most accurate. Then put that bullet in the right place and let it do the work. You have a good rifle there. With a scope, you could well shoot out to 200 yards WITH PRACTICE. But never try to over shoot your skill levels. We get one shot, so wait and make it count. Good hunting to you and good luck with your rifle.
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#7 woodhick

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 05:55 PM

Thank you all for your input and help.:yes: I needed to get the bolt out so I could check out the breechplug and I just couldn't figure it out so I took it to work today and let my coworker Shawn look at it. In five minutes he had the bolt out. What you do is open the bolt in the regular way then depress the bolt like you were going to close it and it slides right out. He is always doing that kind of stuff. We work and work at something and he has in figured out in no time so I told him "I hate you" like we always do and put it away.:blush: Thanks again for all the help and advice.:clap:

#8 Phil

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 05:29 PM

Now we should go to camp Sunday afternoon and shoot it.....I got lots of pyrodex & some 250 gr & 300 grain Hornady XTP bullets.:shifty:
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#9 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 02 October 2010 - 06:47 PM

As usual Cayugad gave not only a lot of info but quality info also. When I first started with my Knight inline I was in the dark about much of what an inline is all about. Cayugad made several suggestions that were right on the money. Infact so much so that my first three shots were a good group. I for one listen when he speaks. I really have to agree that consistancy = better accuracy. I swab with alcohol after every shot with a wet patch followed by two dry ones. If you use real bp you most likely will not encounter hard encrusted residue and it is easily cleaned out with a patch or two to keep that consistancy. I have a ritual I follow when I shoot any muzzleloader. 1. Swab the bore to clean out any oil and let it set a minute or two. 2. Load powder and sabotted bullet and shoot. 3. Swab the bore again right after the shot and let it sit till I go check the target. When I return I load and shoot again. This keeps the barrel cooler and a little time to contemplate the last shot and to concentrate on the next shot.
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