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Gotta Wonder Why?


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#1 Spirithawk

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 03:14 PM

I just gotta wonder why so many guys are so quick to trash talk polymer framed handguns when sitting in their very own gun cabinets are both rifles and shotguns with synthetic stocks? They'll even tell you they have them because of reduced weight and greater durability in all kinds of weather. Seems a bit hypocritical don't it? :lol: :peace:

#2 Jeremiah

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 03:26 PM

Take two of these :cowboy2: and call me in the morning.

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#3 Whitetiger

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 11:40 AM

I concur, it is a bit hypicritical. When I was looking for my carry gun, I didnt go with the poly frames because of muzzle jump. a heavier gun has less muzzle jump because its able to absorb the recoil better then a light weight frame would. Would your follow up shots be more accurate? Since I have a limited budget and could only buy one gun, I went with a traditional frame instead of poly. Didnt want to find out the hard way as my friends who shoot didnt have poly guns of their own for me to try out.

#4 Spirithawk

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 02:11 PM

Whitetiger, surprisingly they actually tend to have less recoil than heavier handguns because the polymer flexes absorbing much of the recoil. Here's part of an article from Guns & Ammo Magazine;

Everyone knew that real firearms were made from steel and walnut. They warned us that polymer handguns ("Tupperware pistols," as some liked to call them) would quickly wear out, degrade, melt or dissolve and scoffed at the notion that plastic could be as tough as steel. Despite these dire predictions and downright hatred directed toward them, polymer-frame pistols quickly became the hottest items on the police handgun market.

And for good reason. Modern polymers provide equal, if not superior, resistance to wear, abrasion, solvents, oils and environmental extremes as steel and alloy-frame pistols. The frames can be molded into a variety of ergonomic shapes that do not require separate grip panels, permitting them to use high-capacity magazines without increasing the bulk of the grip, making them adaptable to persons with smaller hands. They are lighter than steel or alloy, which is a big plus when you have to lug one around for eight or 10 hours a day, and they have the added advantage of flexing under recoil, absorbing some of the recoil pulse so they shoot softer than heavier handguns.

According to recent studies, it is estimated that more than 60 percent of American police officers now carry some sort of polymer-frame pistol. It didn't take civilian shooters long to recognize that the same features that made polymer pistols so practical for police service made them equally adaptable as home-defense, concealed carry, trail and competition handguns. Today almost every handgun maker of note offers a pistol with a polymer frame.

#5 TerryfromAR

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 10:14 PM

Perfect example, Beretta M9 military service pistol, shooting rapid fire you're all over the target because of the sheer weight of the slide ,on the other hand, a Comparably built Glock 9mm pistol in composite.... you can stack the bullets on top of each other consistently....
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#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 11:33 AM

Since the hunting and shooting crowd are for the most part older hunters/shooters and those people have grown up with nothing but wood and steel it is evident that they would turn up their nose to anything but what they have traditionally used. Composite guns just have to be suspect like a cheap plastic imported gadget. Besides Wood on a rifle or handgun is really pretty. Most of those folks don't want to hear about the nasty problems that can come about with wood that are not present in modern alternatives. Doubt if you will ever convince them otherwise either.


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#7 Spirithawk

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Posted 11 November 2010 - 08:23 PM

Since the hunting and shooting crowd are for the most part older hunters/shooters and those people have grown up with nothing but wood and steel it is evident that they would turn up their nose to anything but what they have traditionally used. Composite guns just have to be suspect like a cheap plastic imported gadget. Besides Wood on a rifle or handgun is really pretty. Most of those folks don't want to hear about the nasty problems that can come about with wood that are not present in modern alternatives. Doubt if you will ever convince them otherwise either.



I guess I'm old enough to apreciate both vintage firearms and modern works of great craftsmanship while being young enough to see the beauty and value of a weapon made to do a specific job with more attention to function than beauty. Jason and I both have owned some beautiful, and quite expensive, firearms. For the most part they just sat in the gun cabinet. Way too expensive and pretty to actually put to use. We now have weeded our selection of firearms to where each one we now own fits a purpose and a need. They are each rugged, dependable and well designed to do their jobs well. When we head into the field with one we have every confidince that it will do what we ask of it, with the normal maintenance that any fiream deserves, and we don't worry about rain, sleet, snow, nor scratches and dings that would ruin the value and looks of a beautiful wood stocked firearm. To us therein lies the beauty of them. My main point that I try to get across to people is simple, why not own both, or at the very least, grant other's the right to their choice? I'm having Sameee make me a bumper sticker with a pic of my Kel Tec PF-9 and the words, " IT DON"T HAVE TO BE PRETTY TO SAVE YOUR LIFE!" :peace:

#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 13 November 2010 - 09:35 PM

Know exactly what you mean by having a gun too pretty to shoot. My 270 came with the winchester stock. I decided to make one with a left hand cheekpiece It was ok but was heavier than I wanted so I finally bought a composite stock for it and that is what it sports now. I still have the original stock so if I ever sell it I can put the nearly new stock back on. My 7mm has a wood stock with a left hand cheekpiece that I got really cheap. My turkey gun sports a composite stock with an ar type pistol grip and I like it a lot.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.




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